Naval AiR Station Oceana

Environmental Restoration Program Public Website

Site Descriptions

PFAS Background Information

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are compounds with heat resistant properties that were used in some formulations of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) used for firefighting operations at military installations, including Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana, Naval Auxiliary Landing Field (NALF) Fentress, and Dam Neck Annex. Two of these compounds, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), were present in AFFF used by the Navy from the 1960s through the 1980s. While PFAS-containing foam was sprayed on the ground during equipment testing and training operations in the past, AFFF containing PFOS and PFOA is no longer used at NAS Oceana, NALF Fentress, or Dam Neck Annex, and the AFFF currently in use is for emergency operations only. PFAS are classified as unregulated or “emerging” contaminants, which have no Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) regulatory standards. However, unenforceable provisional health advisories for PFOA (0.4 parts per billion [ppb]) and PFOS (0.2 ppb) were issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in January 2009. On May 19, 2016, USEPA established an unenforceable lifetime health advisory of 70 parts per trillion for the individual or cumulative concentration of PFOA and PFOS.

NAS Oceana

Table 1 includes all sites at Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana that are currently active. Click on a site name within Figure 1 for further information.

Table 1 - Active SWMUs/Sites at NAS Oceana
Site/SWMU ID
Former Site/SWMU ID
SWMU 2A Line Shack Disposal Area, Building 500 Site 2/SWMU 51
SWMU 2B Line Shack Disposal Area, Buildings 130-134 Site 2/SWMU 51
SWMU 2C Line Shack Disposal Area, Building 400 Site 2/SWMU 52
SWMU 2E Line Shack Disposal Area, Building 109 Site 2/SWMUs 1 and 54
Site 3 West Side Landfill SWMU 29
Site 6 Navy Exchange Maintenance Building Waste Oil Disposal Area, Building 518 SWMU 59
Site 7 Fifth Green Landfill SWMU 24
Site 8 North Station Landfill SWMU 26
SWMU 11 Fire Fighting Training Area SWMU 11/62 & 63
SWMU 22 Construction Debris Landfill SWMU 22
SWMU 26 Fire Fighting Burn Pit, Building 220 (Former Tank) SWMU 65
SWMU 66 Former Fire Fighting Training Tank (located within SWMU 11 boundary) SWMU 66
SWMU 100* Oceana Salvage Yard Access Road, Burial Unit, and Surrounding Area --
-- Other PFAS Source Areas --
-- Oceana Pond --
-- Locomotive Shop, Former Building 606 --
-- Former Wastewater Treatment Plant --
-- Area North of Hazardous Waste Storage --
Potential MRP Site**
-- Former Potential Dive Bombing Targets --

*There is not an established boundary for SWMU 100.

**The potential MRP site is currently being evaluated in a Site Inspection.

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 Line Shack Disposal Area, Building 500 (SWMU 2A)

SWMU 2A, the Line Shack Disposal Area, was used historically for aircraft maintenance and cleaning and is located along the flight line at NAS Oceana in the vicinity of Building 500. Naval personnel disposed of various maintenance and cleaning chemicals onto the ground at the SWMU. The chemicals contained organic contaminants, including trichloroethene (TCE). SWMU 2A was reopened for investigation in 2019 due to a lack of closure documentation. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.>

 Line Shack Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs 2B, 2C, and 2E)

SWMUs 2B, 2C, and 2E, the Line Shack SWMUs, were used historically for aircraft maintenance and cleaning, and are located along the flight line at NAS Oceana. Naval personnel disposed of various maintenance and cleaning chemicals onto the ground at the SWMUs. The chemicals contained organic contaminants, including trichloroethene (TCE). Additionally, at SWMU 2E, a waste oil bowser was used to contain waste cleaning chemicals and oils. The oil bowser reportedly leaked, which resulted in a release of the chemicals to the environment. SWMUs 2B, 2C, and 2E have been investigated since 1986. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 West Side Landfill (Site 3)

West Side Landfill, Site 3, was a 6-acre landfill that was operated from 1941 to 1945. Wastes disposed of in the landfill reportedly include construction debris, municipal wastes, and unknown debris. The quantity of chemicals disposed at the landfill was estimated to be roughly 60 pounds of asbestos, 400 gallons of paints and thinners, and 24 pounds of pesticide residues. Site 3 was reopened for investigation in 2017 based on observations during a site visit. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Navy Exchange Maintenance Building Waste Oil Disposal Area, Building 518 (Site 6)

Site 6 includes a strip of ground approximately 25 feet long adjacent to a fence outside of the Building 518, the Naval Exchange Maintenance Building. The Navy Exchange maintenance operations were based in Building 518 as early as the late 1950s. Maintenance operations included minor repairs (e.g., wire splicing, bulb changing, etc.), air conditioning/refrigeration recharging and repair, and minor painting and carpentry. Less than 15 gallons of waste oil per year were reportedly dumped at Site 6 during the 1970s for approximately 10 years. The waste oil was generated from vehicle maintenance activities. After 1982, waste oil was collected by Public Works for disposal. Site 6 was reopened for investigation in 2019 due to a lack of closure documentation. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Fifth Green Landfill (Site 7)

Fifth Green Landfill, Site 7, was identified as an unlined, 4-acre landfill that was operated from 1954 to 1961. Wastes disposed of in the landfill reportedly include asbestos, solvents, pesticides, transformers, municipal wastes, photofinishing wastes, and construction debris. Wastes were burned prior to disposal at the site. Site 7 is currently maintained as approximately 3 acres of the local golf course for use by military personnel, their guests, and dependents. The golf course was built in 1948, but initially was not placed on top of Fifth Green Landfill. Between 1982 and 2003, the golf course was expanded and now covers the Fifth Green Landfill. Site 7 was reopened for investigation in 2017 based on observations during a site visit. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 North Station Landfill (Site 8)

North Station Landfill, Site 8, is located in the eastern portion of NAS Oceana. The site was reported to be a 4-acre site located east of the old airfield. The site was used in the early 1950s to 1954 and appeared to be an unlined borrow pit that was allowed to fill with water. During the operating period, it is believed that the landfill received all solid wastes generated at the facility. The solid waste likely included solvents, pesticides, construction debris, municipal wastes, electrical conductors, transformers, sanitary waste, photo-laboratory waste, and nonhazardous waste. Site 8 was reopened for investigation in 2017 based on observations during a site visit. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Fire Fighting Training Area (SWMU 11, including former SWMU 66)

SWMU 11, the former Fire Fighting Training Area, consists of two former fire fighting training rings and their immediate surroundings. The site is at the intersection of two abandoned runways on the western side of NAS Oceana. A third fire fighting training area, a jet mock-up, exists to the north. SWMU 11 was used for fire fighting training twice a week from the 1960s to the 1980s. In the mid-1970s, the first fire pit was installed with an earthen berm to contain runoff. In the early 1980s, a second fire training ring was installed on a concrete pad with a concrete berm and an oil/water separator to contain petroleum, oils, and lubricants (POL). In the 1990s, a third training ring was built to the north of the jet mock-up on a concrete pad with runoff collection devices. Historical uses of this area have not been documented. SWMU 11 was reopened to investigate potential PFAS contamination during the PFAS Site Inspection (SI). All other constituents were recommended for no further action in 2001.

SWMU 66 consisted of an aboveground steel tank that was used for fire fighting training exercises prior to the use of the fire fighting rings at SWMU 11. The exact location of SWMU 66 is unknown, but it is in the general vicinity of SWMU 11, to the south or southeast of the former fire fighting training rings. Very little is known about the frequency of training exercises at SWMU 66. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Construction Debris Landfill (SWMU 22)

Construction Debris Landfill, SWMU 22, is located in the northeastern portion of NAS Oceana. The site is an approximately 0.55-acre unlined landfill. The years of operation are unknown, but the site was still in use in 1988 when it was identified as a location with potential to pose risks to human health and/or the environment. The landfill was designated for construction debris; however, no controls were in place to prevent other waste from being disposed. Based on observations made in 1988, the waste disposed of at SWMU 22 included construction debris, furniture, empty paint cans, tires, and scrap metal. SWMU 22 was reopened for investigation in 2017 based on observations during a site visit. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Fire Fighting Burn Pit, Building 220 (SWMU 26)

SWMU 26 southeast of Building 220 (Fire Station), consisted of a partially buried tank that was filled with fuel waste and oil, ignited, and extinguished with fire extinguishers. SWMU 26 was used for fire extinguisher training exercises from the 1960s to the 1980s. The tank was removed from the ground by 1990. SWMU 26 was reopened to investigate potential PFAS contamination during the PFAS SI. All other constituents were recommended for no further action in 2001. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Oceana Salvage Yard Access Road, Burial Unit, and Surrounding Area (SWMU 100)

The Oceana Salvage Yard is a privately-owned business located east of NAS Oceana, across Oceana Boulevard. The only access to the site is a road on NAS Oceana property. The Salvage Yard historically disposed of waste, including crushed car batteries, within the road, and also on the sides and shoulders of the road on Navy property.Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Basewide Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Investigation

A Basewide SI for PFAS was initiated at NAS Oceana in 2016. The investigation objectives were to determine whether PFAS are present in groundwater in likely source areas on-Base (including SWMU 11, SWMU 26, known crash locations, and known accidental release locations) and to determine the potential for offsite migration of PFAS contamination.

In December 2016, a public information session was held to notify nearby residents of potential PFAS contamination, and to coordinate sampling of private drinking water wells within a 1-mile radius of monitoring wells with PFOS/PFOA exceedances of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) lifetime health advisory. The Basewide SI, including off-installation sampling of private potable wells, was completed in 2017. PFOS and PFOA (combined) were detected above the lifetime health advisory at one property and bottled water was immediately supplied. Bottled water continues to be provided to the property owner until a long-term solution can be implemented. Additional Basewide investigations for PFAS are on-going to better understand the extent of PFAS contamination. Additional information is provided in the Project Management Plan and on the Oceana PFAS Drinking Water Sampling Page.

 Oceana Pond

In 1986, the Navy acquired a parcel of land, which includes Oceana Pond, through a land swap agreement. The parcel, which is now a recreational area for civilians and installation personnel, is located east of Oceana Boulevard outside the secure area of the installation. In 2012, Navy personnel identified areas of buried debris near Oceana Pond. Based on a historical aerial photograph analysis, it is believed that an area north of Oceana Pond was used as a borrow pit until it was backfilled sometime between 1973 and 1981. It is unknown what material was used as backfill. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Locomotive Shop, Former Building 606

The former Locomotive Shop, also known as the Locomotive Service Building, is located in the southwestern portion of NAS Oceana, west of Hornet Drive. This building is referred to as the Railroad Equipment Shop in the 1986 NAS Oceana Master Plan. No additional information is known about the use of this building. Based on historical aerial photographs, the site appears to have been active from the mid-1950s to 1990s. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Former Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP)

The Former WWTP was put in operation in 1951. In the mid-1970s, NAS Oceana was connected to the Hampton Roads Sanitation District regional collection system; however, prior to that time all sanitary and industrial wastewater was treated at the on-installation plant. The effluent from the Former WWTP was discharged to a ditch running to the west of NAS Oceana. Sludge from the Former WWTP was either applied to land on the western edge of the installation, given away as fertilizer, or disposed of in landfills. The Former WWTP was demolished in 1983-1984. The contents of the anaerobic digester that was used at the Former WWTP were disposed of at the sanitary landfill on the installation sometime shortly after February 1985. These contents included 75,000 gallons of digester water and 350 cubic yards of sludge. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Area North of Hazardous Waste Storage

The Hazardous Waste Storage Area is located in the southwestern portion of NAS Oceana, west of Hornet Drive. The area north of the hazardous waste storage area, also referred to as the Debris Pile, consists of a large debris pile containing mostly metallic and wood debris as well as disassembled railroad tracks and steel matting. It is believed that the Debris Pile was started in the 1990s. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

 Former Potential Dive Bombing Targets

The Former Potential Dive Bombing Targets are located in the northwestern portion of NAS Oceana and consists of two circular areas totaling 8 acres. The northern portion of the site consists of 1.6 acres and the southern portion of the site consists of 6.4 acres. The location of the Former Potential Dive Bombing Targets is the present-day operational airfield and land use is not expected to change. It is believed the dive bombing targets would have been used between 1941 and 1944, although this is unconfirmed. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Project Management Plan.

NALF Fentress

Table 2 includes all sites at NALF Fentress that are currently active. Click on a site name within Figure 2 for further information.

Table 2 - Active SWMUs/Sites at NALF Fentress
Site ID Former SWMU ID
14 Fentress Landfill SWMU 23
17 Firefighting Training Areas SWMU 64
-- Underground Storage Tank 20B --
-- Other PFAS Sites --
UXO 9 Dive Bombing Targets --
-- Magazine Storage Area --


 
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 Fentress Landfill (Site 14)

Site 14, the Fentress Landfill, occupies approximately 3 acres of land directly north of the northeast end of the principal runway at NALF Fentress. Wastes reportedly disposed at this landfill include asbestos, solvents, oils, pesticide residue, and transformers containing an unknown quantity of polychlorinated biphenyls. The landfill was reportedly used from 1945 to 1970. The Navy initiated investigations at the Fentress Landfill in 1991. Historical investigations and ongoing and planned environmental restoration activities at Site 14 are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Fire Fighting Training Areas (Site 17)

Site 17, the Fire Fighting Training Areas, includes three NALF Fentress firefighting training areas and their immediate surroundings. The firefighting training areas are located in various areas of the abandoned runways in the northwestern corner of the base. Site 17A, the northwest firefighting training area, is estimated to have been active from approximately 1959 to the 1960s. No additional information regarding active firefighting training activities at Site 17A is available. Site 17B, the southern firefighting training area is estimated to have been active from approximately 1982 to 1994. Site 17B was an active firefighting training area where jet fuel was ignited and extinguished. During these activities, mixtures of firefighting agents, water, and residual fuel were generated. The Navy initiated investigations at Site 17B in 1991. Site 17C, the northeast firefighting training area, is estimated to have been active from approximately 1961 to 1982. Site 17C was identified as the location of a mobile unit firefighting training area where training activities only using water occurred. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities at Site 17 are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Underground Storage Tank (UST) 20B

UST 20B consisted of a 1,000-gallon steel tank for storing gasoline that was located in front of Building 20 at NALF Fentress. UST 20B initially was investigated in 1992 after a gasoline release was reported to the Virginia State Water Control Board. Historical and planned environmental restoration activities at the UST 20B site are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Basewide PFAS Investigation

A Basewide SI for PFAS was initiated at NALF Fentress in 2015. The investigation objectives were to determine whether PFAS are present in groundwater in likely source areas on Base and to determine the potential for offsite migration of PFAS contamination. Source areas evaluated included Site 14 and Site 17, crash truck test areas, and crash sites where firefighting foam was used. Additionally, the investigation approach included sampling of the base drinking water and wastewater and sampling of 52 private drinking water wells on 49 properties with the consent of the property owners. Additional sampling has brought the total number of private drinking water wells sampled to 65 (on 59 properties). A summary of previous and planned environmental investigation and restoration activities is provided in the Site Management Plan.

 Dive Bombing Targets (UXO 9)

UXO 9, the Dive Bombing Targets (DBTs), consists of two adjacent DBTs dating from 1955 are located northwest of the runway in a forested and undeveloped area at NALF Fentress. Each target is approximately 6.5 acres in size. Probable munitions used at the DBTs include practice bombs, MK4 signal cartridges, spotting/witness charges, and bomb signal cartridges. Historical and planned investigation and restoration activities are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Magazine Storage Area

The Magazine Storage Area was identified during review of historical aerial photographs. The Magazine Storage Area consists of five ammunition and explosive storage magazines (Buildings 73-77) and one inert material storage building (Building 78). Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

Dam Neck Annex

Table 3 includes all sites at Dam Neck Annex that are currently active. Click on a site name within Figure 3 for further information.

Table 3 - Active SWMUs/Sites at Dam Neck Annex
Site ID
1 Regulus Avenue Landfill
3 Drone Repair Shop
4 Regulus Avenue Metal Scrapyard
5 Public Works Disposal Area
-- Fire Station
-- Basewide PFAS
-- Former Wastewater Treatment Plant
UXO 7 Moving Target/Mortar Range (South)
UXO 8 Skeet and Trap Range
UXO 13 Moving Target/Mortar Range (North)
Potential MRP Sites*
-- Land Buffer Parcel
-- Potential Offshore Rockets
-- Lake Tecumseh

*Potential MRP sites are currently being evaluated in a Site Inspection.

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 Regulus Avenue Landfill (Site 1)

Site 1, the Regulus Avenue Landfill, is an inactive, unlined landfill located on 10 acres in the southern portion of Dam Neck Annex. The landfill site was in operation from 1953 to 1976, and received 3 to 17 tons per day of solid waste from Dam Neck Annex. Historical records indicate that wastes disposed in the landfill consisted of municipal waste, pesticides, asbestos, construction debris, lime, paints, petroleum products, alcohols, sewage sludge, ordnance, and hazardous wastes. Wastes disposed at the landfill were burned or buried. There is possibility that drums containing aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), which was used for firefighting, were disposed in the landfill. When the landfill was closed in 1976, a layer of clean fill, with an average thickness of 4 feet, was placed over the debris. Historical and planned investigation and restoration activities at Site 1 are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Drone Repair Shop (Site 3)

Site 3, the Drone Repair Shop, operated from 1942 until the building was demolished in 1972 and repaired drones, resulting in the generation of POL. A subsurface tank possibly connected to a leach field located north of the shop was used for disposal of waste POL. An estimated 460 gallons of POL may have been discharged if 10 percent of the waste POL generated by the Drone Repair Shop were disposed of through the leach field. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Regulus Avenue Metal Scrapyard (Site 4)

Site 4, the Regulus Avenue Metal Scrapyard, was used primarily as a scrapyard for the disposal of lumber, metal, solvents, paints, and sulfuric acid lead batteries from 1978 to 1981 and continued to unofficially receive waste until 1984. Most liquid wastes were probably residues remaining in empty or unused cans. The Initial Assessment Study estimated approximately 20 gallons of paints and solvents were discharged over a 4-year period. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Public Works Disposal Area (Site 5)

Site 5, the Public Works Disposal Area, consisted of wastes from the metal shop, including cutting oils, solvents, lead carbonate cutting oil lubricant, paint thinner, and motor oil, that were poured on the ground behind the Public Works area. Disposal activities were reported from 1954 to 1979. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Fire House (Building 525)

The Fire House (Building 525) was constructed in 1956 and is located north of Lake Tecumseh. Building 525 was identified as a potential per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) source area due to firefighting training activities that were reported to have occurred on the concrete pad south of the building. According to previous reports, approximately 30 gallons of AFFF were used annually and washed off the concrete pad into the grass. Building 525 was opened as a new site in 2017. Planned investigation and restoration activities at Building 525 are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Basewide PFAS Investigation

In response to a NAVFAC Headquarters directive, a Preliminary Assessment for PFAS at Dam Neck Annex was finalized in 2020. The Preliminary Assessment identified additional potential source areas that are not already under investigation at Dam Neck Annex. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Former Wastewater Treatment Plant

The Former Wastewater Treatment Plant operated from 1954 to 1976 and was located on the southern end or Tartar Avenue and surround on three sides by Lake Tecumseh. This plant had a normal operating capacity of 432,000 gallons per day. Sludge from the plant was dried in beds located adjacent to the treatment plant, where the majority of the sludge was also disposed of. The Former Wastewater Treatment Plant discharged into Lake Tecumseh and operated under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits. No environmental investigations were previously conducted at the Former Wastewater Treatment Plant. Planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Moving Target/Mortar Range - South (UXO7)

The Moving Target Mortar Range - South is located in the southeastern portion of Dam Neck Annex. The range was used in the 1940s and 1950s. Based on the range boundaries and period of use, probable munitions used at the Moving Target Mortar Range - South were determined to include .30- and .50-caliber small-arms projectiles and 60-millimeter (mm) and 81-mm mortars. Historical and planned investigation and restoration activities at the Moving Target Mortar Range - South are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Skeet and Trap Range (UXO 8)

The former Skeet and Trap Range, located on the southwestern portion of Dam Neck Annex on the eastern shore of Lake Tecumseh, was composed of four skeet ranges and four trap ranges, with approximately half of the former range area extending into Lake Tecumseh. Because of the historic activities at this site, debris related to small-arms firing range ammunition may be present. The primary contaminant associated with shotgun ammunition is lead. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) also were identified as potential contaminants because of their association with clay targets. Historical and planned investigation and restoration activities at the Skeet and Trap Range are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Moving Target/Mortar Range - North (UXO 13)

The Moving Target Mortar Range - North is located in the southeastern portion of Dam Neck Annex. The range was used in the 1940s and 1950s. The suspected target/impact area of the former range lies within the operational range area and is not eligible for investigation under the Munitions Response Program; however, other portions of the site are under investigation. Based on the range boundaries and period of use, probable munitions used at the Moving Target Mortar Range - North were determined to include .30- and .50 caliber small-arms projectiles and 60-mm and 81-mm mortars. Historical and planned investigation and restoration activities at the Moving Target Mortar Range - North are included in the Site Management Plan.

 Land Buffer Parcel

The Land Buffer Parcel consists of 27.5 acres located in the northern portion of Dam Neck Annex. Since 1945, the parcel has been used by the Virginia National Guard for military activities. It was part of Naval Amphibious Base, Norfolk, until 1977 when it was transferred to the United States Army. In 2005, citing the need for a land buffer between private development and military operations, the Navy commenced planning activities to support reacquiring the parcel. The property was transferred back to the Navy in 2008. A PA was finalized in 2020 and recommended an SI to confirm the presence or absence of potential munitions and explosives of concern at the site. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Potential Offshore Rockets

The Potential Offshore Rockets site, consisting of approximately 210 acres, is located offshore within the Atlantic Ocean of the northern portion of Dam Neck Annex. A PA was finalized in FY 2020 and recommended an SI to confirm the presence or absence of potential munitions and explosives of concern at the site. Findings and planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

 Lake Tecumseh

Lake Tecumseh is a 261-acre lake located along the southwestern boundary of Dam Neck Annex. The 1984 Dam Neck Initial Assessment Study indicated that munitions may have been disposed of in the lake. Planned environmental restoration activities are summarized in the Site Management Plan.

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