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St. Juliens Creek Annex

Environmental Restoration Program Public Website

Environmental Restoration Program Sites

Fifty-nine potentially-contaminated Installation Restoration Program (IRP) sites, Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs), and Areas of Concern (AOCs), and Munitions Response Program (MRP) areas have been identified for evaluation at St. Juliens Creek Annex (SJCA) based on assessments and investigations. Three IRP sites (Sites 2, 4, and 21) and no MRP areas are currently active in the SJCA Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). Following desktop audits, Site Investigations, and/or removal actions, 56 sites, SWMUs, and AOCs have been identified for no further action by the SJCA ERP Partnering Team. Additional site information on the active and NFA sites is detailed in the Site Management Plan.

Click on a site name within the figures below for further information.

Active IRP Site Locations

No Further Action Site Locations

Active IRP Sites

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 Site 2 - Waste Disposal Area B

Background: Site 2 is a 6.2-acre site in the southern portion of SJCA. The site includes an unlined waste disposal area that operated from 1921 until some time after 1947. Initially, refuse was burned openly onsite and used to fill in portions of a tidal inlet that was located in the center of the site and was connected to St. Juliens Creek by a culvert. Mixed municipal wastes, solvents, waste ordnance, and abrasive blast media from ship overhaul and repair operations were disposed at the site. An incinerator was installed in 1942 to replace the open burning practices.

Remedial Investigation (RI) activities indicated potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to chemicals in waste, soil, sediment, surface water, and shallow aquifer groundwater. The primary contaminants identified were chlorinated solvents (trichloroethene [TCE] and its breakdown products) in shallow groundwater and surface water and inorganics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and sediment. The Proposed Plan identified soil cover, excavation, enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), monitored natural attenuation (MNA), and land use controls (LUCs) as the preferred remedial alternative for addressing the human health and ecological risks. The record of decision (ROD) documenting the selected remedy has been signed. The remedial action was initiated in 2012 and the construction phase of the remedial action has been completed.

Site 2 Remedial Action

Specific components of the remedial action include the following:

  • Cover installation over waste, soil, and inlet sediment

  • Excavation of St. Juliens Creek sediment

  • ERD within high-concentration chlorinated solvent target area of shallow groundwater

  • MNA within low-concentration chlorinated solvent, naphthalene, and heptachlor epoxide target areas of shallow groundwater

  • LUCs

    • Maintain the soil cover and prevent exposure to waste and contaminants in soil and inlet sediment

    • Prevent direct exposure to and/or potable use of shallow groundwater

The remedial action is being completed in a phased approach, as follows:

Phase 1 – Preparatory Activities (complete)

  • Existing building foundation and surface debris demolition

  • Storm water and drainage modifications to re-route drainage around Site 2

  • Compensatory wetland mitigation to offset permanent loss of Site 2 wetland

Phase 2 – Cover System Installation (complete)

Phase 3 – St. Juliens Creek Sediment Excavation (complete)

Phase 4 – Groundwater Treatment (in progress)

  • ERD Treatment

    • Emulsified vegetable oil injected into the high-concentration chlorinated solvent target area

      • Emulsified vegetable oil will stimulate naturally occurring microbes in the subsurface to breakdown the chlorinated solvents

    • Additional microbes injected to further aid in breakdown of chlorinated solvents to nontoxic products

    • Injection layout consists of a series of rows placed perpendicular to groundwater flow

      • Groundwater is expected to flow through these rows and be treated

  • MNA
    • Being conducted concurrently with ERD performance monitoring

    • Sampling will confirm concentrations are decreasing and groundwater conditions will allow for further reductions in the contaminant concentrations

    • Additional ERD treatment may be necessary if concentrations stop decreasing

 

Because hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants remain on site, a five-year review was conducted in 2020 to determine if the selected remedy remains protective of human health and the environment. The Third Five-Year Review for SJCA indicated that the remedy is in place, functioning as designed, and is protective of human health and the environment. Exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risk have been addressed by previous remedial action activities and continue to be controlled through a combination of a soil cover and land use controls (LUCs), and Remedial Action-Operation (RA-O) maintenance and monitoring is ongoing.

CERCLA Status: The remedial action is currently in the operation phase. The remedial action-operation phase includes groundwater monitoring and additional emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injections, as needed. LUCs are in place to prevent unacceptable exposure to waste and COCs in soil, inlet sediment, and shallow aquifer groundwater.

Next Steps: Remedial action-operation, implementation and maintenance of the LUCs, and five-year reviews will continue until the remedial action objectives are met.

 Site 4 - Landfill D

Background: Landfill D consists of 8.3 acres in the northeastern portion of SJCA at the confluence of Blows Creek and the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. The first indication of activity at Site 4 was trenching identified on a historical aerial photograph from 1961. From 1970 until 1981, sanitary landfill operations were conducted at Site 4 and the wastes managed were primarily trash, wet garbage, construction material, and out-dated civil defense storage material. RI activities identified potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to chemicals in waste, soil, and drainage sediment.

A remedial action was conducted from March through October 2005 and included:

  • Installation of a minimum 2-foot soil cover over the landfill

  • Removal of surface debris from the wetland area adjacent to Blows Creek

  • Removal of drainage sediment and re-construction of site drainages

  • Implementation of LUCs to prohibit digging into or disturbing the soil cover or landfill contents and to prohibit future residential use and development of the site

A Remedial Action Completion Report was finalized in September 2006 documenting the completion of the remedial action and demonstrating that the remedial action objectives described in the FS had been met. Because the remedial action resulted in hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants remaining on site, a five-year review was conducted in 2020 to determine if the selected remedy remains protective of human health and the environment. The Third Five-Year Review indicated that the remedy at Site 4 is in place, functioning as designed, and is protective of human health and the environment. Exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risk have been addressed by previous remedial action activities and continue to be controlled through a combination of a soil cover and LUCs.

CERCLA Status: Site 4 has achieved Response Complete. LUCs are in place to prevent unacceptable exposure to waste and COCs in soil.

Next Steps: Implementation and maintenance of the LUCs, and five-year reviews will continue to be conducted.

 Site 21 - Industrial Area

Background: Site 21 is an industrial area in the southcentral portion of SJCA. Buildings at Site 21 were historically used as machine, vehicle, and locomotive maintenance shops; electrical shops; and munitions loading facilities. A fuel service station was also located in the vicinity. Outdoor areas were used for equipment and chemical storage. Several of these buildings and/or their surrounding areas were former IRP sites. Many of the older buildings at the site have been demolished. The existing buildings and the Site 21 area are currently used primarily for storage and maintenance activities. An active warehouse currently used by Fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Norfolk Integrated Logistics Support was constructed in 1992. A storm sewer system runs through the site and drains south to a storm water detention basin which outfalls to St. Juliens Creek.

Remedial Investigation (RI) activities identified potential risks to human health from exposure to chlorinated solvents (trichloroethene [TCE] and its breakdown products) in the shallow aquifer groundwater. Potential risk associated with vapor intrusion into onsite buildings was also identified. An Interim Proposed Plan identified in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) and enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) as the preferred remedial alternative for addressing potential risk from potable use of shallow groundwater and the Interim Record of Decision (ROD) documenting the interim response action has been signed. The Proposed Plan and ROD were “interim” because they did not address the potential risk to current and future building occupants from vapor intrusion through inhalation of indoor air, which was still being evaluated. The response action selected in the Interim ROD was selected as an interim action in order to reduce constituent of concern (COC) concentrations while the vapor intrusion pathway was investigated. An interim remedial design was developed for implementation of the interim action.

An investigation was conducted to further evaluate the potential vapor intrusion pathway. The results were documented in an RI and Feasibility Study (FS) Addendum Report, which recommended additional vapor intrusion monitoring and land use controls (LUCs) to maintain the current industrial building use and prevent activities that would compromise the integrity of the building envelopes throughout the Interim remedial action; and discontinuation of the monitoring and LUCs upon completion of the remedial action for groundwater.

Because no risk from vapor intrusion was identified in the RI and FS Addendum, the interim remedial action will not change and will serve as the final remedial action and a final RD will not be necessary. A LUC Remedial Design (RD) has been completed. A Proposed Plan identified ISCR and ERD as the final site preferred alternative and the ROD documenting the final response action has been signed. The remedial action was initiated in 2011 and the construction phase of the remedial action has been completed.

Site 21 Remedial Action

Specific components of the remedial action include the following:
  • Implementation of ISCR through direct injection of zero valent iron (ZVI) into the accessible portions of the high-concentration chlorinated solvents zone of the shallow aquifer groundwater
  • Implementation of ERD through injection of EVO into the accessible portions of the low-concentration chlorinated solvents zone of the shallow aquifer groundwater
  • Performance monitoring following the ZVI and ERD injections to confirm COC concentrations in the groundwater continue to decrease
 

What is ISCR and how is it being implemented?

  • ISCR is a process that causes a chemical reaction to break down chlorinated solvents TCE and its daughter products to nontoxic products
    • ZVI powder mixed with water was injected with pressure using nitrogen gas to help push it into the shallow aquifer groundwater
    • Results are relatively fast (can be seen within 3 to 4 weeks to 3 to 4 months) and can remain active for many years (up to 8 years)
    • As TCE and its daughter products breakdown and concentrations decrease, any additional treatment determined to be necessary at the site is not expected to require ISCR and all treatment will transition to ERD
 

What is ERD and how is it being implemented?

  • ERD is a process where naturally occurring microbes in the subsurface are stimulated to break down TCE to nontoxic products
    • Vegetable oil mixed with water is injected into the shallow aquifer groundwater in a similar method as the ZVI injections to create conditions favorable for microbes to flourish
    • Results are not as quick (can be seen within months to years) and do not last as long (1.5 to 3 years) as ZVI

 

Because hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants remain on site, a five-year review was conducted in 2020 to determine if the selected remedy remains protective of human health and the environment. The Third Five-Year Review for SJCA review indicated that the remedy at Site 21 is in place, functioning as designed, and is protective of human health and the environment. Exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risk have been addressed by previous remedial action activities and continue to be controlled by LUCs, and RA-O maintenance and monitoring is ongoing.

CERCLA Status: The remedial action is currently in the operation phase. Remedial action-operation includes groundwater monitoring to evaluate remedy effectiveness, vapor intrusion monitoring to evaluate whether the remedial action or building deterioration have resulted in potential unacceptable inhalation risks or explosive hazards, and additional emulsified vegetable oil injections as needed. LUCs are in place to prevent unacceptable exposure to COCs in shallow aquifer groundwater.

Next Steps: Remedial action-operation, implementation and maintenance of the LUCs, and five-year reviews will continue until remedial action objectives are achieved.

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No Further Action Sites

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 Site 1 - Waste Disposal Area A

Site 1 consisted of a one-acre area east of the Dominion-Virginia Electric Power Company Right-of Way, west of a set of railroad tracks, and north of Building 146. The waste disposal area was reportedly used from 1921 to 1924 for the disposal of trash and garbage, including pesticides, acids, and bases. It was reported that trash was burned at the site and the ashes used to fill the marsh area adjacent to Blows Creek. The estimated volume of disposed material prior to being burned was 30,000 cubic yards. The actual extent of waste disposal is unknown and site boundaries are approximate.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 1, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated the marsh area as containing construction rubble and lumber. A faint sheen was noted on the standing water. Further investigation of soil and groundwater was recommended.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nor radiation was present in the air.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. DDT, DDE, and several PAHs were detected in soil, and nitrobenzene was detected in the groundwater.

As part of the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) Scoring conducted in 2000, surface water and sediment samples were collected from Blows Creek in the vicinity of the waste disposal area. The downstream sample collected closest to Site 1 was described as “black sand” while other samples both upstream and downstream of the site had components of silt and organic material. Since both fine-grained material and organic material have a greater tendency to adsorb contaminants, the dominance of sand in the downstream sample was considered to bias the sample toward lower concentrations of contaminants. Furthermore, the samples were collected during rising (incoming) tide, which could have prevented representative samples from being collected. Based on the evaluation of this data, it was determined that there appeared to be data gaps that should be addressed.

In 2001, during investigations to support a Site Screening Assessment (SSA), four surface water and four sediment samples were collected from Blows Creek, north of Site 1, to address the data gaps identified during the HRS field investigation. All the analytical results were combined to conduct human health and ecological risk screenings that determined groundwater, sediment, and soil at Site 1 were not media of concern. The human health risk screening (HHRS), however, did recommend further evaluation of surface water to determine if inorganics in surface water were site-related or related to background or reference conditions in Blows Creek. No further evaluation was found to be necessary based on the ERS. It was recommended that trenching activities be conducted to determine the limits of the waste disposal area and character of the waste.

In 2002, three test pits were excavated at Site 1 and no evidence of waste was encountered. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 1 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on RRR data and the test pit results and an addendum to the SSA was submitted in 2003 that documented the closeout of Site 1.

 Site 3 - Waste Disposal Area C

Site 3 is a former waste disposal area that covers approximately 2.1 acres in the northeastern corner of SJCA. Site 3 was originally a mudflat where refuse was allowed to burn; the ash was then used to fill the area. Operations began in 1940 and continued until 1970 and refuse reportedly disposed of included solvents, acids, bases, and mixed municipal waste in addition to trichloroethylene waste oil and oil sludges. Two pits reportedly were used for disposal of the oil and oily sludge as well as for periodic burning. Prior to burning, the total volume of waste disposed of was estimated to be 27,778 cubic yards (CY). Refuse was burned and extinguished daily with water from a fire hose. Salvageable materials were removed from the site daily and every two weeks the site was bulldozed for compaction and leveling. After 1970, the area was graded level and covered with grass.

The Remedial Investigation (RI) for Site 3 was completed in March 2003. Potential human health and ecological concerns included risk from exposure to waste and inorganics and PAHs in soil and drainage ditch sediment. The RI recommended a removal action for Site 3; including waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil; to mitigate risks and eliminate concern for continued transport of potential contaminants to Blows Creek via the site-related drainage ditches. Further evaluation of the potential for adverse effects to aquatic life in Blows Creek sediment was also recommended based on chemical concentrations of inorganics and pesticides in upland drainage ditch sediment/soil. A separate Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) for Blows Creek is currently being conducted to identify potential risk associated with possible historical contributions to Blows Creek from upland Navy IR Program sites, including Site 3.

Based on the findings of the RI, an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) was conducted to identify and analyze remedies or removal actions to mitigate potential risk at Site 3. The selected Non-Time-Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) included excavation and off-site disposal of waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil. The volume of the material and soil to be removed was estimated to be 9,204 CY and confirmatory samples were to be collected from the remaining soils at the sides and bottom of the excavated areas to verify that clean-up goals were met. The NTCRA activities at Site 3 were completed in March 2004. Approximately 9,500 CY of waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil were removed based on the confirmatory sample results. A Confirmation Closeout Report was completed in August 2004.

Based upon the complete removal of waste and soil at Site 3, which mitigated the potential risks to human and ecological receptors, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for closure of Site 3. The Proposed Plan (PP) for Site 3 was issued in November 2004 and identified no further action (NFA) as the preferred alternative. No public comments were received. The Final NFA Record of Decision (ROD) for Site 3 was submitted in April 2005 and signed in February 2006.

 Site 5 - Burning Grounds

Site 5 is consisted of approximately 23-acres located in the northeastern portion of SJCA. A 4.3-acre unlined waste disposal area was located at the center of the site. Much of the Site 5 area was historically used for placement of dredge spoil material that reportedly originated from Blows Creek and the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. Operations began at the Burning Grounds in the 1930s when waste ordnance materials were disposed of by open burning. Tetryl, trinitrotoluene (TNT), fuzes, solvents, paint sludge, pesticides, and various types of refuse were also disposed. In mid-1977, the Burning Grounds surface was used for facility-wide decontamination of ordnance equipment and material. The decontamination process included filling equipment from buildings with oil and straw and igniting them. Afterwards, the ground surface was reportedly covered with oil and straw and burned. The top 6 inches of soil was then disced, and the ground surface was covered with oil and straw and burned again. The area currently consists of an open field with a wetland in the center and a forested area and Blows Creek to the south.

RI activities indicated potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to chemicals in waste, soil, and drainage sediment. The primary contaminants identified were inorganics and pesticides. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis was conducted to evaluate alternatives to address the waste/burnt soil area and impacted surface soil and drainage sediment areas and recommended a removal action of those areas.

Blows Creek, a tidally-influenced brackish water tributary to the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River, runs along the southern extent of Site 5 and through the center of SJCA. Several IRP sites are located within the Blows Creek drainage basin and have been identified as potential historical contaminant sources to Blows Creek; therefore, the creek has been incorporated into Site 5 under the IRP. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted to determine whether historical contributions to Blows Creek from upland Navy IRP sites, including Site 5, caused adverse environmental impacts in the creek. Results indicated that no further action for Blows Creek was necessary.

A non-time critical removal action to address potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to Site 5 waste, soil, and drainage sediment was completed in 2012.

Although the expanded RI report documented No Further Action for groundwater, a supplemental RI was conducted to evaluate shallow aquifer groundwater conditions following the Removal Action. The supplemental RI concluded that there were potential unacceptable risks to human receptors from exposure to select inorganics in the shallow aquifer groundwater. However, evaluation of the data indicated the concentrations of inorganics in the shallow aquifer groundwater were the result of naturally occurring site conditions. Therefore, No Further Action for the shallow aquifer groundwater at Site 5 was recommended.  The No Further Action Proposed Plan was submitted in 2015 and the No Further Action Record of Decision was signed in May 2016.

 Site 6 - Small Arms Unit

Site 6 was operated as part of the ordnance disposal operations at SJCA and has also been referred to as "Caged Pit." The Small Arms Unit consisted of an 8-ft-wide by 20-ft long by 12-ft-high steel container underlain by a concrete pad, known as the caged pit. Interviews with former employees indicated that small items were transported into a steel container via a conveyor belt for destruction. Historical records do not indicate the dates of operation. A review of historical aerial photographs indicates that activities associated with Site 6 likely began around 1949 and continued through the 1980s.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 6, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated an unknown volume of small items, such as igniters and fuses, were burned in the unit. The RFA also reported that the Navy had filled in the area "during recent years" and recommended investigation of soil and groundwater.

As part of the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) System Data Collection Report in 1996, one surface soil sample was collected from Site 6. With the exception of three pesticides and one metal, the detected compounds were at concentrations below background levels.

Due to its proximity to Site 5, this site was investigated with Site 5 during the Remedial Investigation (RI) completed in 2003. RI field investigation activities at Site 6 included a geophysical survey and the collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples. No visual signs of waste or stained/burned soil were observed at Site 6; however, test pit debris (specifically pieces of concrete) may have been the remains of the pit. The Remedial Investigation/ Human Health Risk Assessment/Ecological Risk Assessment Report (RI/HHRA/ERA) identified potential human health risks associated with metals in soil. However, the highest concentrations of all compounds were detected in soil at Site 5; therefore, the identified risks would be biased high as applied to Site 6 soil. To achieve closure of Site 6, the SJCA Partnering Team agreed to conduct a complete removal of waste and soil action for Site 6.

An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) was prepared in June 2002 in response to the potential risks with soil exposure. A removal action was completed in September 2002 and included excavation of remnants of the Small Arms Unit, as well as surrounding material posing a potential risk to human health and the environment. A Closeout Report documenting the closure of Site 6 was submitted in March 2003. The no further action (NFA) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PRAP) and Record of Decision (ROD) were submitted in 2003 and the ROD was signed in September 2003.

 Site 7 - Old Storage Yard

Site 7 consisted of a previously fenced, outdoor grassy area used to store a variety of material including anchors, chain and equipment. The initial start date for the site is unknown. The site, however, was active when the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) was conducted in 1989. During previous site investigations, 5-gallon containers of hydraulic oil, lubricating oil, lead paint, and open drums of sandblast grit were observed. There was also evidence that oil had leaked or was drained onto the soil from some of the equipment being stored at the site.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 7, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that oil had leaked or been drained from one of the pieces of equipment stored at the site. Open drums of sand blast grit were stored and observed to have spilled onto the ground surface. The RFA recommended that sources of potentially hazardous wastes or constituent releases be addressed and that surface soil samples be collected in stained areas to determine the potential for a release.

Two soil samples were collected and during the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and methylene chloride were detected in the samples. The RRR results were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS) as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. Based on the HHRS and ERS, the SJCA Partnering Team recommended no further action (NFA) for the site. Surface debris was removed in 2002 and the site was closed for NFA.

 Site 8 - Cross and Mine

Site 8 was located near the intersection of Cross Street and Mine Road, adjacent to, and north of, Building 212 and across the street from Building M-1. From the 1950s to mid-1960s, the site was used for disposal of rinse water from mobile insecticide and herbicide spray trucks. It is estimated that 675,000 gallons of rinse water were discharged directly to the ground and allowed to infiltrate into the soil.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 8, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither VOCs nor radiation was present in the air.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the area was devoid of vegetation and recommended soil sampling.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for pesticides and PCBs. Pesticides detected in one or more soil samples include DDT, DDD, DDE, and endrin. No pesticides or PCBs were detected in groundwater.

The RRR results were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS) as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No risks were found to exist. However, concerns remained regarding the historical record of 675,000 gallons of pesticide rinse water discharged to the ground remained and the site is recommended for further study.

A Site Investigation (SI) was conducted at Site 8 in 2003. The investigation consisted of the installation of direct-push probes for the collection of grab groundwater samples to determine the presence or absence of pesticides using analytical field test kits. Based on the test kit results and previous RRR results, four shallow monitoring wells were installed and groundwater samples were collected. Based on the HHRS, no unacceptable risks to humans exposed to constituents in soil at Site 8 were identified and the ERS results suggested a minimal potential for adverse effects to aquatic life from the presence of pesticides in groundwater. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was recommended for Site 8. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA at Site 8 in May 2004.

 Site 9 - Building 249

Several activities were conducted at Building 249 including, pest control, oil/water separation, and a washrack. The washrack was located at the east end of Building 249 and was a single concrete wash pad which was divided into two separate stalls. One stall was rebuilt in approximately 1981 and the other was constructed in 1986. Each stall measured approximately 15 feet by 40 feet and was surrounding by 6 inch to 8 inch concrete berms. One stall was used to remove grease and the other was used to rinse non-greasy items. The unit was located outdoors and was not covered.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981 identified that from the mid-1960s to 1976, the wash pad was used for cleaning pesticides and herbicides out of mobile spray tanks. Wastes managed at Site 9 also included solvent wastewater from rinsing various types of equipment. Prior to 1976, the wash pad waste discharged toward the southern end of the wash pad and into a storm drain which discharged to a swampy area that discharged to St. Juliens Creek. In 1976, the discharge stream was redirected to a sanitary sewer. Oily sludge was observed on the soil beyond the secondary containment of the pad.

During the IAS, Building 249 was used for storing a variety of unused equipment and pesticides, but was mostly empty. Three 55-gallon drums and one bag of pesticides were being stored in the building during the IAS. The drums and bags contained pesticides including Malathion, Exxon XD 3-30, Ortho VOKK 70, and diazinon. The IAS revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 9, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither VOCs nor radiation was present in the air.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the discharge from the area was being directed to an oil/water separator located adjacent to the wash pad. The separator was a subgrade, concrete, open-top tank with a metal grating cover. Rinsate and washdown material from the wash pad were collected in the separator. The RFA states that SJCA personnel reportedly pumped sludge on a periodic basis from the bottom of the separator into a vacuum truck. The sludge was transported offsite for final disposal. Excess water was directed to a POTW conduit via a level control outlet. It is not known when the oil/water separator was installed. No evidence of release from the separator was noted. The building was being used as a repair and maintenance shop for vehicles at the facility. Building 249 contained heavy equipment, vehicles needing repair, tools, and operational areas (e.g., solvent baths) normally found in automotive garages. The RFA recommended management practices to control waste runoff.

Site 9 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction (Building 1556). Site 9 was closed for no further action (NFA), as documented in the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA).

 Site 10 - Waste Disposal at Railroad Tracks and Swale Beneath Building 13

Site 10 was located in the vicinity of Building 13 and was a reported disposal location for wastes generated during hardware cleaning operations from pre-1940 to the mid-1970s. Wastes handled at this location included Alodine (a caustic detergent), methyl ethyl ketone, and acetone. It was also reported that liquid wastes were poured on the railroad tracks, though no evidence of a release has been observed. The railroad track is currently inactive.

The SJCA Partnering Team determined that SWMU 31 (the swale beneath Building 13) should be addressed as part of Site 10.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 10, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that Building 13 was a well-maintained machine shop and no evidence of release was observed. However, soil sampling was recommended to determine if hazardous constituents had been released. SWMU 31 was identified in the RFA as a swale that ran under Building 13 and eventually drained into St. Juliens Creek. Rinsate generated from the washing of smokeless powder cans that were washed in Buildings 13 and 47 was emptied into the swale. During the RFA, neither the swale area nor any evidence of contamination such as staining or stressed vegetation were found. Facility representatives indicated that they did not know of a swale in this area.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to a variety of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and methylene chloride were detected in the soil; however concentrations were below the quantitation limit of the analytical instruments. The groundwater contained low levels of trichloroethene.

During meetings/site visits conducted in November 1999 and February 2000, it was observed that the former swale located between Buildings 13 and 199/278 (Sites 10 and 17, respectively) was paved. The former swale would have traversed Site 17 and Site 2, currently under the Remedial Investigation (RI) process. Historical photographs show that this area has been paved since 1949.

Site 10 was included in the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) conducted in 2002. Human health and ecological risk screenings were conducted using the RRR data and it was determined that groundwater and surface soil at Site 10 do not pose a concern to human health and do not warrant further evaluation. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus during a site visit in July 2001 that Site 10 required no further action (NFA).

 Site 11 - Waste Disposal at Building 53 (formerly Building 266)

Site 11 was located at Building 53 (formerly referred to as Building 266), which was the facility electrical shop located in the industrial area east of Cradock Street. Station electricians reportedly used 5 gallons of trichloroethene per month at the site. Most of the solvent evaporated, but the remainder was disposed on the railroad track bed adjacent to Building 53.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 11, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the building had been converted to a recreation room and no evidence of waste disposal around the building was found. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. Surface soil contained DDT, DDE, dieldrin, endrin, and aroclor-1260. Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected at concentrations below the instrument quantitation limit. Methylene chloride and trichloroethene were both detected (below the quantitation limit) at a concentration of approximately 6 ppb. The groundwater sample contained several metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,2-dichloroethene (total) (100 ppb), methylene chloride (11 ppb), and trichloroethene (46 ppb).

The RRR data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screens as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No surface soil human health risks were found for one of the two soil samples. Groundwater VOC results, however, were above the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). No additional ecological evaluation was recommended in the SSA. Due to its proximity to Site 21 where trichloroethene was also detected in a site groundwater sample, VOCs in Site 11 groundwater will be addressed under further investigation of groundwater at Site 21. Consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team during the July 2001 site visit.

 Site 12 - Sand Blast Area Building 323

Site 12 was located at Building 323 where sand blasting operations were conducted. It is not known when sand blasting operations began at Site 12. Wastes at the site consisted of waste blast grit and particulates removed from the items being blasted (e.g., paint, metal).

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the building consisted of bare floors and a metal shed which was covered, divided into two stalls, and open at two ends. No release controls were in place at the unit, although there was a roof and several walls to help confine particulate waste as it was generated. It was stated that additional barriers were being planned for installation in the future to prevent particulate waste grit from escaping the building. Sand blast waste was observed on the ground surrounding Building 323 and it was recommended that it be assessed to determine if there were hazardous constituents associated with the material.

Site 12 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 12 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on the removal action.

 Site 13 - Waste Generation Area

Site 13 was a fenced concrete pad used to store waste liquids (e.g., battery acid, lacquer thinner, antifreeze, and lube oils) prior to being sent to the waste accumulation area. The pad measured approximately 20 feet by 20 feet and was surrounded by a 6-foot high chain-link fence. Entrance into the area was controlled by a locked gate. The concrete pad was surrounded by sand bags forming a berm. It is not known when waste storage operations began at Site 13.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that oily stains were present on the concrete pad and surrounding soil. Waste liquids were contained in closed, 55-gallon barrels. After the barrels were filled, they were relocated to the facility waste accumulation area within 72 hours of filling. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

Site 13 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 13 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on the removal action.

 Site 14 - Washrack Building 266

Site 14 was a washrack reportedly located at Building 266. The area was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction (Building 1556). Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 14 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team.

 Site 15 - Fire Training Area

Site 15 is the fire training area located at Building 271. Site 15 consists of two adjacent celled areas which are used to train personnel to fight fires. One of the celled areas consists of a burning site where wooden pallets are soaked with diesel, ignited, and extinguished with water. The other burning site is a buried stainless steel pit measuring approximately 4-feet wide by 4-feet long by 3-feet deep. The pit was filled with diesel fuel which is ignited and extinguished using carbon dioxide. It is not known when waste storage operations began at Site 15. Wastes managed at this site include wooden pallets and diesel fuel.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that no controls structures, other than the stainless steel pit, were in place to control releases to the environment. During the RFA, blackened and stained soil was observed and ashes from the burning of the pallets were piled along the fence-line behind the fire training area. The soil where the diesel fuel was stored also was found to be stained. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released and management practices be considered.

Site 15 will be investigated under the Navy's Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. Therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 15 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team.

 Site 16 - Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Storage/Salvage Yard

Site 16 consists of the area surrounding Buildings 400, 168, and 173 and is a clearing house for any items excessed by the government. Wastes handled include scrap metal, old boats and vehicles, obsolete equipment, and excess hardware items. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that Waste, including scrap stainless steel, was observed at the site. Localized oily stains were observed on several bare soil areas where machinery and equipment were stored. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released and that potential releases be addressed.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to several metals, the following organic contaminants were detected in soil: DDD, DDT, alpha chlordane, aroclor-1254, dieldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, gamma chlordane, di-n-butylphthalate, di-n-octylphthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and several PAHs. Groundwater samples from the site contained acetone and methylene chloride.

Consensus for no further action (NFA) at Site 16 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team since the DRMO is managed under RCRA.

 Site 17 - Storage Pad at Building 279

Site 17 is located within the industrial area of the Base, east of Cradock Street, and consists of a concrete storage pad located just outside Building 279. The storage pad was used to store two 55-gallon drums of PD-860, a commercial product used as a degreaser.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that a two gallon bucket was hanging under the tap of one of the barrels to catch drippings. The two gallon was full to overflowing and there were stains on the concrete pad and surrounding soil. The RFA recommended that the unit be referred to RCRA and suggested alternative management practices.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to inorganic constituents, the following organic constituents were detected in site soils: DDD, DDE, DDT, alpha-chlordane, aroclor-1254, dieldrin, endrin, gamma-chlordane, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and several PAHs. No organic constituents were detected in the groundwater sample.

Four surface soil samples were collected and analyzed as part of an Expanded Site Investigation (SI) conducted in 2001. Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were present above background concentrations and human health and ecological screening values. The SI concluded that Site 17 may pose a risk to human health and the environment. It was recommended that an additional investigation be conducted to define the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminants and better define any potential risk.

The roof and walls of Building 278/279 were demolished in early 2003, the flooring and concrete pilings are still in place awaiting final removal. Based upon the proximity to Site 2, the SJCA Partnering Team agreed in February 2003 that further action related to Site 17 will be addressed under Site 2.

 Site 18 - Building 47

Site 18 is located adjacent to the south wall of Building 47 and consisted of small amounts of black blasting grit on the ground surface.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the source of the blasting grit could not be determined. Although Building 47 housed two sand blasting booths, personnel working in that building reported that they do not use black blasting grit in their machines. Therefore, the source of the material identified as grit during the RFA site visit is unknown. An air compressor was also identified at Building 47. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, a surface soil sample was collected. Inorganics as well as several SVOCs (mostly PAHs), and two VOCs (methylene chloride and trichloroethene, both at a concentration of approximately 4 ppb) were detected.

The RRR data was used to conduct a human health and ecological risk screening as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No human health risk was identified and no further ecological evaluation was recommended. In addition, during the July 2001 SJCA Partnering Team site visit, no blast grit was observed in several hand auger borings. Consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team during the site visit.

 Site 19 - Building 19

Site 19 consists of former Building 190 and the surrounding area. Building 190 was located just south of the mouth of Blows Creek at the confluence of the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River (Figure 1-2). The building was heavily used for loading explosives, including Explosive D and Composition A-3, into ammunition from the 1940s to the 1970s.

In mid-1977, all ordnance-handling buildings were decontaminated by flushing with chemical solutions and water. Prior to decontamination, Naval Ammunition Production Engineering Center(NAPEC)visually inspected the facilities and collected samples for chemical analysis to develop appropriate decontamination procedures for each building.

 Site 20 - Wharf Area Sediments

Site 20 is located adjacent to the former wharf in the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River where ordnance had been reportedly dropped during loading and unloading operations.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, indicated that Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team divers identified some metal and thick silt deposits in the area of the old pier. The IAS revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 20, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, recommended that the facility implement a program to determine if residual ordnance exists and remedial cleanup, if necessary.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, an underwater reconnaissance and a magnetometer survey, in which EOD divers searched the sediments, were performed in that area. The magnetometer survey identified approximately 68 buried "contacts" surrounding the former wharf pilings. Many individual "contacts" were identified in random locations between the pilings. The most significant concentration of "contacts" was along the center west side of the pilings, between the pilings and the river bank. No visual confirmation of "contacts" was made during the RRR data collection study. It is important to note that "contacts" might indicate any type of buried metal object, and does not necessarily indicate the presence of buried ordnance. Four sediment samples were collected and one explosive, 1,2-dinitrobenzene, was detected in one sediment sample. Metals, one pesticide, several PAHs, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and one VOC (methylene chloride), were detected in sediment.

The RRR data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screens as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. Site 20 sediment was not found to pose a potential concern to human health. The ecological risk screening (ERS) concluded the potential for adverse effects to benthic organisms is likely minimal and does not warrant further evaluation. However, due to the potential for buried ordnance, signs were posted at Site 20 to prohibit intrusive activities. Additionally, the Navy placed a warning notice for potential unexploded ordnance (UXO) at Site 20 in Navy Real Estate Documents and The US Army Corps of Engineers were notified of the potential for UXO at Site 20.

During the July 2001 site visit, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA). The site will be managed under the Munitions Response Program (MRP).

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No Further Action AOCs

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 EPIC AOC 1 - E Street and Marsh Road Ground Scarring

EPIC AOC 1 is located in the northernmost area of SJCA, near the intersection of E Street and Marsh Road. AOC 1 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. In the EPIC study interpretation of the 1937 aerial photograph, this AOC was identified as a possible waste disposal area. Ground scarring, both north and south of Marsh Road, was apparent in the photograph. The area north of Marsh Road was approximately 200 feet by 150 feet, and the area south of Marsh Road was approximately 125 feet by 80 feet. By 1949, the date of the subsequent EPIC photograph, the area had been developed and Buildings 182 and 181 were constructed north of and over part of the scarring. The observation of marine shell fragments in the soil during a site visit in November 1999 indicated that the area had possibly been filled with dredge material.

An electromagnetic (EM) geophysical survey and surface soil and subsurface soil sample collection were conducted in 2001 as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA). Seven of the eight anomalies observed during the EM geophysical survey were attributed to utilities or other underground features. Inorganics, three pesticides (DDD, DDE, and DDT), 19 SVOCs (including 17 PAHs), and one VOC (methylene chloride) were detected in surface soil samples. Five pesticides, one PCB (aroclor-1260), 17 SVOCs (mostly PAHs), and two VOCs (acetone and methylene chloride) were measured in subsurface soil samples.

The results of the investigation were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS). Based on the HHRS, the SSA recommended further evaluation of surface soil. Additional consideration for ecological impacts to Blows Creek from PAHs was also recommended. The SJCA Partnering Team considered the site for NFA but decided that additional desktop review of the site was necessary.

A Site Investigation (SI) of AOC 1 was conducted in August 2003 and included surface soil sampling. Based on the HHRS, no unacceptable risks to humans exposed to constituents in soil at AOC 1 were identified. The ERS results suggested very little potential for PAHs originating from AOC 1 to be transported to Blows Creek. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was recommended for AOC 1. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA in May 2004.

 EPIC AOC 2 - Piers in Front of Building 83

EPIC AOC 2 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. A review of a 1974 EPIC photograph showed storage of materials, possibly ordnance, in rows approximately 150 feet long in the fenced area immediately adjacent to the pier. Storage of items in this manner was not evident in photographs after 1976. In 1977, all SJCA ordnance operations/processes were moved to the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown. Additionally, releases have not been reported for this EPIC AOC. Since EPIC AOC 2 was identified in June 1999 through a review of historical aerial photographs, no sampling has been conducted.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a work-in-progress meeting that was held and a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Based on a review of current and past conditions and the location of EPIC AOC 2, it was determined that sampling was not warranted.

Based upon available information and a July 2001 site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 2 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and requires no further action (NFA).

 EPIC AOC 3 - Ground Scarring at Building M-5

EPIC AOC 3 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Ground scarring was identified east of Building M-5 on the April 1949 aerial photograph. The area of scarring was roughly circular and approximately 70 feet in diameter. The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon review of current and past conditions and location of this EPIC AOC through additional evaluation of aerial photographs, it was confirmed that the ground scarring was fill material. Review of subsequent aerial photographs indicated that the SJCA facility was extended into this area east of Building M-5. This was evident in the 1937 photograph, which showed an extension of the facility to the east of Building M-5. It was concluded that sampling was not warranted for this site.

Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 3 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and requires no further action (NFA).

 EPIC AOC 4 - Parking Area South of Building M-1

EPIC AOC 4 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Soil staining and possible storage tanks were identified in a parking area located south of Building M-1 during the EPIC Study in a May 1958 aerial photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team and it was concluded that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, EPIC AOC 4 was determined not to pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 EPIC AOC 5 - Possible Soil Staining Between Buildings 87 and 88

EPIC AOC 5 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Areas of possible dark staining between Buildings 87 and 88 (located in the central part of the industrial area of the Annex) were identified in a 1964 photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team. Areas of standing water were observed and grading of the area did not achieve proper drainage. Based on additional review of aerial photographs and evaluation of past and present site conditions, the areas appeared to be ponded water. Therefore, sampling was not warranted.

During a July 2001 site visit, the area was mixed grass and gravel, no standing water was observed, and there were no indications of current or historical contamination in the area. Based upon the available information and site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 5 does not pose a risk to human health or the environments and no further action (NFA) was required.

 EPIC AOC 6 - Ground Scarring East of Side 2

EPIC AOC 6 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site, located to the west of Cradock Street across from Site 2, was identified as a possible ground scarring and waste disposal area from a 1964 aerial photograph. A review of a March 1963 photograph showed no activity at this location. However, aerial photographs from May 1970 and onwards, showed the presence of a high voltage transmission tower in the disturbed area shown in the 1964 photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Based on additional review of aerial photographs and evaluation of past and present site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached that EPIC AOC 6 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 EPIC AOC 7 - City of Portsmouth Outgrant Area

EPIC AOC 7 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This area is located just off of Victory Avenue and outside the main gate of SJCA in the City of Portsmouth outgrant area. It was identified during the EPIC Study from a 1974 aerial photograph as a storage area. In a 1985 photograph, rows of mounded material were observed. This material was thought to be truckloads of soil staged for filling of the area. By 1986, there was evidence of scarring and ground disturbance as well as mounded material, indicating that filling activities had begun.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached that EPIC AOC 7 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 EPIC AOC 8 - Possible Waste Disposal/Bulk Storage Area

EPIC AOC 8 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site is located northeast of and adjacent to Building 176. EPIC AOC 8 was identified in the EPIC study interpretation of the 1974 aerial photograph as a possible bulk storage area or waste disposal area. The area is flat and currently is covered with grass. It is approximately 300 feet long by 60 feet wide. No activity has been identified at this location in either earlier or later photographs.

In November 1999, a site visit was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Through a review of current and past conditions and the location of this EPIC AOC, it was determined that sampling was warranted.

Accordingly, surface soil and subsurface soil samples were collected and an electromagnetic (EM) survey was conducted to delineate the site boundary, locate possible waste such as buried drums and metallic debris, and characterize the soil profile above the water table. Three anomalies were identified during the survey. One anomaly appeared to be caused by above-ground features (existing fence and metal structures) and two anomalies were due to small buried man-made objects.

The sampling results were used during the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002 to conduct a human health and ecological risk screening. No human health concerns were found for exposure to surface soil and subsurface soil and no further evaluation of ecological effects was recommended. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached for no further action (NFA).

 EPIC AOC 9 - Ground Scarring South of Building 75

EPIC AOC 9 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Aerial photography from February 1976 showed ground scarring under the steam line next to the railroad tracks. This area is relatively small, approximately 40 feet by 40 feet, and is located about 75 feet southwest of Building 75. This EPIC AOC was also identified in previous 1970s and early 1980s photographs.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, the "ground scarring" appeared to be due to steam from the overhead steam lines. It was determined that sampling was not warranted.

Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, EPIC AOC 9 was not considered to pose a risk to human health and the environment and consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached.

 EPIC AOC 10 - Ground Scarring in Wharf Area

EPIC AOC 10 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This area was identified as "ground scarring" from a June 1986 aerial photograph. It is located in the area of the Wharf, south of the east corner of Building M-5. Photographs from 1974 indicated that this area was the former location of Buildings 244, 245, and 256. The scarring was probably the result of demolition of these buildings between 1974 and 1986.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a site visit in July 2001, EPIC AOC 10 was not considered to pose a risk to human health and the environment and consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached.

 EPIC AOC 11 - Open Storage Area Northeast of Building 55

EPIC AOC 11 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. From 1985 and 1986 aerial photographs, this area was identified as an area of open storage of drums and material at Building 55 between the railroad tracks and the road. There is no evidence of storage in this area in previous or subsequent photographs.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted.

In July 2001, a site visit was conducted and the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus that EPIC AOC 11 does not pose a risk to human health and the environment. Review of aerial photographs from before 1985 and after 1986 showed no evidence of this area being used to store drums and other materials. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was required at the site.

 EPIC AOC 12 - Sandy Flat

EPIC AOC 12 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site is located north of Buildings M-1 and M-5, directly adjacent to Blows Creek. It is a sandy, flat area next to the railroad tracks and it is approximately 240 feet long by 70 feet wide. In a 1937 aerial photograph, the area appeared as a marsh. By 1949, the area was devoid of vegetation. In the 1961 and 1964 photographs, a dark mounded material was noted in the area. None of the photographs showed storage or waste disposal activities. The area is still non-vegetated with sandy soil at the surface.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. During the site visit, marine shell fragments were observed in the soil, which indicates that the area had been filled during development of the area. Due to the lack of vegetation in the area for extended periods of time, this EPIC AOC was proposed for additional investigation in 2001.

In 2001, surface soil and subsurface soil samples were collected and an electromagnetic (EM) survey was conducted to delineate the site boundary, locate possible waste such as buried drums and metallic debris, and characterize the soil profile above the water table. Four anomalies were identified during the survey. One anomaly was probably due to partially buried concrete blocks, two anomalies were most likely caused by buried man-made objects, and one anomaly appeared to be due to the adjacent railroad tracks.

The analytical data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screenings as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. The human health risk screening (HHRS) concluded that contact with EPIC AOC 12 surface and subsurface soil was not expected to be a concern. In addition, no significant potential ecological effects were identified. Therefore, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) at EPIC AOC 12.

 AOC 13 - PCP Dip Tank

AOC 13 was identified during a December 2001 interview with former employees. AOC 13 is located in an open bay of Building M-3. Two pentachlorophenol (PCP) dip tanks were located on the western wall of the open bay and were reportedly in operation for approximately two years (1951-1953) during the Korean War. Conveyor belts extended through the bay wall into the tanks. No known releases have occurred at this site.

During site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 by the Tier I SJCA Partnering Team, no evidence of staining on the concrete floor or other signs of releases were observed. However, based upon a lack of information on the location of drying operations, the Tier I SJCA Partnering Team decided that the site warranted investigation. No previous investigations have been conducted at AOC 13.

Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health or ecological risks were identified, therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

 AOC 14 - Building 89

AOC 14 is located at the former Building 89 location. Building 89 was used for loading projectiles, including 8-inch and 16-inch shells with Explosive D compounds (a mixture of organic nitrated compounds and combustible materials such as hydrocarbons and aluminum powder). The building was demolished sometime after 1999. A review of the available maps did not indicate that drainage lines were present in the building. No known releases are associated with this site and no contaminant releases were identified during demolition activities. The site currently consists of a grass-covered field. The SJCA Partnering Team decided to investigate AOC 14 to determine the absence or presence of contamination. No previous investigations have been conducted.

Soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health risks were identified. Although the ecological risk screening (ERS) concluded that there may be the potential for chemicals in onsite surface soils to be transported to the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River, it is unlikely chemicals originating from AOC 14 would reach the River. Therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

 AOC D - Storm Water Outfalls

AOC D consists of 35 storm water outfalls identified at SJCA. None of the outfalls are connected to sanitary sewers. The outfalls are listed as an AOC based on past releases from waste management areas located near storm water drains, lines and outfall structures. The storm water outfalls will be investigated under CERCLA on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations may include sampling various outfalls to determine whether there has been a release of hazardous constituents.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA under CERCLA, as the storm water outfalls will be investigated under CERCLA on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations may include sampling various outfalls to determine whether there has been a release of hazardous constituents.

 AOC E - Temporary Pump Storage

AOC E is located at Building 104 and is used to temporarily store generators, pumps, and heavy equipment. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, noted that lubricating oil had leaked from one of the pumps onto the bare ground. The leaking pump was removed and placed on the concrete foundation of Building 104.

AOC E was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction and requires no further action (NFA).

 AOC F - Underground Storage Tanks

AOC F consists of nine underground storage tanks (USTs). The tanks are constructed from steel, concrete, and fiberglass, and are located at Buildings 113, 201 (two tanks), 263, 266, 271, and 283 (three tanks). The capacity of the tanks ranges from 250 to 8,000 gallons. The tanks are approximately 25 to 45 years old.

According to the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, several tanks were reportedly out of service but still in place; others were being used for storage of refined fuels (diesel and gasoline). However, AOC F requires no further action (NFA) as the USTs are managed under the Navy'’s UST Program.

 AOC G - Former Process Buildings

AOC G consists of former process buildings located throughout SJCA. The former process buildings include structures where various processes and operations were performed; some of which were suspected to have generated hazardous constituents. Some of the structures included under AOC G no longer exist and some structures still exist but are no longer conducting process operations. A comprehensive list of existing and non-existing former process buildings is not available. It is also not known whether buildings were cleaned or decontaminated prior to being torn down or the type of waste management practices that were implemented at the buildings.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) under CERCLA, however, as new information becomes available on the locations and processes conducted at former process buildings, the SJCA Partnering Team will determine if new AOCs should be added. Any former process buildings identified for further evaluation will be evaluated on a site-specific basis.

 AOC J - Former Ammunition Manufacturing Areas

AOC J consists of former areas used for manufacturing ammunition. Buildings in which ammunition is believed to have been handled include Buildings 12, 13, 14, 18, 29 (which has been torn down, and was formerly adjacent to the east end of M-2), 32, 32A, 33 (these three buildings were located between Buildings 17, 38, and 39), 39, 41, 43, 46, 47, 89, 180, 184, 185, 188, 190, 193, 222 (Victory Building located between Site 5 and Blows Creek), 240 through 246, 256, 267, M-3, M-4, M-5, and M-5 Annex. According to the Initial Assessment Study (IAS), different sizes and types of ammunition were loaded with black powder, smokeless powders, Explosive D, trinitrotoluene (TNT), Composition A-3, and tetryl in these areas since 1898. It is not known whether these areas were cleaned or decontaminated prior to being decommissioned as ammunition manufacturing areas.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) under CERCLA, however, as new information becomes available on the manufacturing areas, the SJCA Partnering Team will determine if new AOCs should be added. Any former ammunition manufacturing areas identified for further evaluation will be evaluated on a site-specific basis.

 AOC K - Former Sewage Treatment Plant

AOC K consists of a former sewage treatment plant (STP). The plant was initially identified in the 1981 Initial Assessment Study (IAS) as a small STP located proximal to Building 318. The plant operated from 1942 to 1947 and the waste handled at this unit reportedly consisted of treated wastewater from the onsite barracks. An inspection of the site where the plant was reportedly located did not reveal any evidence of its existence.

The SJCA Partnering Team determined that AOC K warranted further investigation based upon the potential for mercury contamination from trickling filters that may have been part of the STP process. No previous investigations have been conducted at AOC K.

Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health or ecological risks were identified, therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

No Further Action SWMUs

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 SWMU 10 - Hazardous Waste Container Storage Building 154Y

SWMU 10 was located in Building 154Y as a greater-than-90-day waste storage bunker. Building 154Y consists of a concrete bunker covered with soil on all sides except the entrance.

According to the 1989 RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA), the floor of the bunker was treated with a waterproof epoxy coating and air vents extend through the roof of the bunker. The bunker began operating as a waste storage area in August 1981. Wastes managed included both characteristic (e.g., D001, D002, and D003) and listed hazardous waste (e.g., F001, F002, F003, and F005). At the time of the RFA, the bunker was operating under an interim status and a drainage ditch extended across the front of the bunker.

During a RCRA Compliance Evaluation Inspection conducted in June 1986, the majority of drums at the SWMU were either badly corroded or bulging. The contents of some of the drums had leaked on or were spilled on the ground. In addition, inspection reports indicated the drums inside the unit were in unsatisfactory condition during April and May 1987 inspections. However, during the RFA in 1989, no evidence of a release was observed either inside or outside the unit. SWMU 10 was managed under RCRA, therefore, no further action (NFA) was recommended.

 SWMU 11 - Hazardous Waste Container Storage Building 163Y

SWMU 11 is located in Building 163Y and is a greater than 90 day waste storage bunker. SWMU 11 consists of a concrete bunker covered with soil on all sides except the entrance.

According to the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) in 1989, the floor of the bunker was treated with a waterproof epoxy coating and was sloped to drain into troughs. Air vents extend through the roof of the bunker. The front of the bunker previously had a railroad spur extending to the entrance of the unit. At the time of the RFA, a drainage ditch extended across the front of the bunker. The bunker began operating as a waste storage area in August 1981. Wastes managed at SWMU 11 include listed hazardous waste and large quantities of unknown waste. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercuric nitrate, and trichloroethene are known to have been stored at this unit. Designated areas within the interior of the bunker were used for storing alkali, acid, flammable, and other regulated material waste types. Twelve drums, all located on wooden pallets, were observed inside the building. Absorbent material emitting an organic odor was observed outside the bunker entrance in 1989; however, no staining was observed on soil surrounding the unit. SWMU 11 is managed under RCRA, therefore, requires no further action (NFA).

 SWMU 12 - PCB Storage Building 198

SWMU 12 is a warehouse located in Building 198. Warehousing operations at Building 198 began in March 1976. The warehouse stored Kepone until the fall of 1978. During the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) in 1989, the building was storing PCB transformers and PCB oil. At the time of the RFA, this fully enclosed, locked building contained four 55-gallon barrels and three transformers situated on wooden pallets. The floor of the building is concrete treated with epoxy and no environmental releases were evident. SWMU 12 is regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) and requires no further action (NFA).

 SWMU 18 - Old Storage Yard #2

SWMU 18 is located south of Building 154Y and consists of an asphalt pad measuring approximately 100 by 400 feet. The area is used to store scrap metal and various types of metal equipment. Two old metal tanks with holding capacities of more than 1,000 gallons were observed during the 1989 RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The source of the tanks is not known but it appeared that they could have been boilers removed from a ship. It is not known when waste storage operations began at this unit. No releases were evident during the RFA.

This SWMU was determined to require no further action (NFA) due to the low potential for releases to surrounding environmental media.

 SWMU 19- Old Storage Yard #3

SWMU 19 is located adjacent to Site 15 located at Building 271. This SWMU consisted of a fenced concrete pad which appeared to be the foundation of a building previously located at the site. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) identified the area to measure approximately 40 feet by 500 feet. The pad is partially surrounded by a concrete berm less than 6 inches high. In the center of the pad is a small metal building measuring approximately 20 feet by 40 feet. The area was used to store scrap metal, obsolete equipment, and piping. It is not known when waste storage operations began at this unit. No releases were evident during the RFA. The RFA recommended site management practices be implemented at this SWMU. The SJCA Partnering Team site visit in November 2002 did not identify concerns with the storage yard and a consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached.

 SWMU 21 - Hazardous Waste Accumulation Areas (SIMA#2)

SWMU 21 is located east of Building 47 and consists of a concrete pad measuring approximately 20 feet by 40 feet. The pad is surrounded by a concrete berm less than 6 inches high and sand bags. The area is enclosed by an 8-foot high chain-link fence and a locking gate. It is not known when this SWMU began operating. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, stated that SWMU 21 received waste from Site 14. Waste stored at this SWMU include old batteries, waste lacquer thinner, lube, and oils. At the time of the RFA, there were approximately 13 batteries and two 55-gallon drums of waste lube oil located in the building. Waste material was stored at this SWMU before being transported to a RCRA interim status storage facility.

The RFA recommended no further action (NFA) for this SWMU. A SJCA Partnering Team site visit in November 2002 did not identify concerns with the SWMU and consensus for NFA was reached. The Navy submitted a closure notification letter to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) for SWMU 21.

 SWMU 22 - Repair Shop satellite storage area Northeast of Building 40

SWMU 22 was a repair shop satellite area located northeast of Building 40. The SWMU is an outdoor concrete pad approximately 15 feet by 35 feet and is surrounded by sand bags on two sides and a concrete curb on the other two sides. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989 indicated that the pad was used in the past for the storage of hazardous waste for a period less than 90 days. According to the facility and the RFA, this SWMU began storing waste as early as 1985 and operated for approximately two years. In 1989 the unit was inactive and no waste was observed. Oily stains were noted on the concrete pad, but no soil staining was evident. The RFA recommended no further action (NFA) for this SWMU. A SJCA Partnering Team site visit in November 2002 did not identify concerns and consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached. The Navy submitted a closure notification letter to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) for SWMU 22.

 SWMU 26 - Scrap Metal Storage in Railroad Cars Near Building 176

SWMU 26 consisted of four open-topped railroad storage cars containing scrap metal. The cars were located on an active railroad spur near Building 176. It is not known when waste storage in the railroad cars began. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, reported that the types of waste included stainless steel scrap metal destined for Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO). No environmental releases from this unit were evident. SWMU 26 is managed under RCRA and therefore, requires no further action (NFA).

 SWMU 29 - Dumpsters (throughout the Facility)

SWMU 29 consists of dumpsters located throughout the SJCA facility. Certain dumpsters have closed tops. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, reported that each dumpster is emptied on a regular schedule by a contractor for offsite disposal. According to the RFA, wastes handled in these dumpsters include burnable waste (e.g., refuse), salvageable waste (e.g., metal), non-burnable, non-salvageable waste (e.g., sand), and asbestos waste. No release to the environment were observed during the 1989 RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) other than the dumpster identified at IR Site 7 (formerly SWMU 17). SWMU 29 is managed under RCRA and therefore, no further action (NFA) is required.

 SWMU 32 - Overland Drainage Ditches

SWMU 32 consists of overland drainage ditches located throughout the SJCA facility. A series of overland drainage ditches were used to transport process wastewater and runoff from process areas to receiving waters. The 1989 RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) indicated that process waste was collected and managed at waste generation points and was no longer transported via the ditches. Ditches in the vicinity of Site 4 were inspected during the 1989 RFA and there was no evidence of waste transport in these ditches and no evidence of environmental releases.

SWMU 32 was determined to require no further action (NFA). Drainage ditches associated with individual sites, AOCs, or SWMUs will be investigated on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations will identify the exact boundaries of the drainage ditch and samples will be collected at all locations where there is either visible evidence of release or suspicion that past releases may have occurred.

 SWMU 33- Sewer Drainage System

SWMU 33 consists of the underground sewer drainage system used for both sanitary sewage and storm water runoff. The 1989 RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) indicated that past waste management practices were to wash unspecified waste into floor drains. Ultimately, this waste would enter either the sanitary or storm water sewer system. Waste was generated from fuze drill-out operations, ammunition breakdown operations, steam-out operations, degreasing operations, and boiler plant operations.

During the RFA, it was noted that the oil/water separator (Site 9), which collects rinsate from the wash pad at Building 249 (also part of Site 9), is tied to the sanitary sewer. It was also noted that unspecified spilled liquids in operational areas may enter the drain system.

This SWMU requires no further action (NFA). The sewer drainage system associated with individual sites, AOCs, or SWMUs will be investigated on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations will include evaluating the integrity of the subsurface system and may include soil sampling to determine if hazardous constituents have been released.

 SWMU 34 - Operational Waste Accumulation Areas

SWMU 34 consists of various waste accumulation areas located throughout SJCA. The areas are located in enclosed buildings with concrete floors. According to the 1989 RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA), a typical operational waste accumulation area is a "two-day" storage area located within a portion of the building designated as the waste accumulation area and identified as a painted floor area. Typical waste accumulation areas contained a single, closed, 55-gallon drum and a closed, 5-gallon can.

The waste managed at each unit is specific to the operation being conducted in each building. Wastes are expected to include various waste oils and solvents. No environmental releases were observed during the RFA.

SWMU 34 is managed under RCRA, therefore no further action (NFA) is required.

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No Further Action MRP Areas

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 Area UXO 1 - Wharf Area Sediments

Area UXO 1 includes the current and former wharf areas and piers along the shoreline of the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River, comprising approximately 2,230 linear feet. The northern wharf area (Wharf 3), located in the northeast portion of St. Juliens Creek Annex (SJCA) adjacent to Building M-5 and former Building 190, was constructed in 1917 and historically used for loading Mark VI mines. The wharf was partially demolished in 1933 for fire prevention reasons, and presently only the pilings from the wharf remain. The southern wharf, consisting of Wharf 1 and Wharf 2 located in the southeast portion of SJCA, was initially constructed between 1898 and 1903 and used to aid in ordnance loading. During World War II, the two wharfs were joined together, and an extension, referred to as the dolphin pier/ lighter storage area, was added in order to support the increased production of ordnance for the war. Ordnance-loading activities continued until the early 1970s. Wharf 1 is now considered condemned, largely due to damage caused when it was struck by two vessels in 1975. Wharf 2 is still in use for the occasional mooring of contractor and cable supply ships.

The northern wharf area was previously identified as Site 20 in the Installation Restoration Program. The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted in 1981 concluded that ordnance may have been dropped into the river adjacent to the former wharf area during loading and unloading operations. The assumed ordnance items were not considered a hazard as long as the sediment was not disturbed. The IAS recommended that real estate records be annotated to indicate that unexploded ordnance UXO) may be present. During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR), a site reconnaissance, magnetometer survey, and sediment sampling were conducted in the Site 20 (northern wharf) area. Approximately 68 contacts were identified in the area surrounding the former wharf pilings; however, the presence of buried ordnance and no visual confirmation of the contacts was made. One volatile organic compound, multiple semivolatile organic compounds, one pesticide, one explosive, and multiple inorganics were detected in the sediment. As part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA), the analytical results from the sediment samples collected during the RRR were used to conduct human health and ecological risk screenings. No risk was identified to human receptors. Potential ecological risk was identified for benthic organisms in the sediment; however the risk was considered minimal and no further evaluation of ecological risk was recommended. No further action (NFA) was recommended for Site 20 under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act based on the findings of the human health and ecological risk screenings and the fact that potential risk from buried ordnance would be addressed under the Navy’s Range Program. The NFA decision was documented in the SSA.

Based on recommendations made in the SSA, signs were posted in the area to prohibit intrusive activities, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was notified of the potential presence of buried ordnance. A note was added to the internet Navy Facility Assets Data Store under the SJCA Wharf Property Record cards stating: "Unexploded ordnance may exist along all of the St. Juliens Creek Annex Wharfs." Additionally, real estate map was annotated to indicate the potential presence of UXO.

The Navy’s Range Program was never fully implemented, and ordnance sites are now addressed under the Munitions Response Program (MRP). Because site history indicates a potential presence of ordnance, in 2008 the wharf areas (northern and southern) were identified as Area UXO 1 and included under the MRP. A Preliminary Assessment (PA), consisting of a desktop and archive search on historical site activities, was conducted in 2009. Although no documentation was found to confirm the presence of ordnance in the vicinity of the wharf areas, anecdotal evidence obtained through individual interviews indicated there is a potential for ordnance to have been dropped during loading operations, which may have resulted in the presence of ordnance or ordnance constituents, in the sediment beneath the wharf areas. The PA recommended further investigation in the northern and southern wharf areas; however, no further investigation of the dolphin pier area and removal of that area from the MRP site boundary was recommended because historical records indicated that it was a light storage area and no known ordnance loading occurred from it.

A Site Investigation (SI) was conducted in February 2010 to determine whether there is evidence that the ordnance-loading activities at the wharfs in Area UXO 1 resulted in ordnance being dropped into the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. The field activities included bathymetric, side-scan sonar, and digital geophysical mapping (DGM) surveys within the northern and southern wharf areas. The investigation identified geophysical anomalies, representing metallic items, within the sediment of both wharf areas. The SI report stated that the presence of metallic items is evidence that ordnance could potentially be present within the site and recommended an additional investigation to visually inspect the anomaly sources identified during the DGM survey from select locations. The expanded SI (anomaly source investigation) was conducted in July and August 2012. The investigation consisted of acquisition and inspection of metallic debris and collection of sediment samples from 15 locations. The report documenting the results of the expanded SI will be completed in March 2013.

In July and August 2012, an ESI was conducted to determine if a subset of the anomaly sources identified during the DGM survey represented MEC, and to determine whether or not munitions constituents (MC) were present at detectable concentration in site sediment. The ESI consisted of metallic debris acquisition at 15 location using a barge-mounted electromagnet and raking system and the collection of sediment samples from 15 investigation locations. Of the 1,580 pounds of metallic debris recovered, no MEC items were discovered during the investigation.

Sediment sampling at the 15 investigation locations resulted in only one analyte (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene [TNT]) being detected at three locations. Of these three detections, none exceeded the human health risk project action limit (PAL) and only one exceeded the ecological risk PAL. The human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS) concluded that the chemical concentrations detected in the sediment samples did not present unacceptable human health or ecological risks.

The ESI resulted in no MEC being identified at any of the investigation locations, limited detections of chemical concentrations in sediment, and no unacceptable human health or ecological risks. Based on the results of the ESI, no further investigation of anomaly sources or analytical sampling to characterize the nature and extent of contamination or to further evaluate the presence of MEC is warranted for Area UXO 1. Declaration Statement for no further action was signed June 2013.

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