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OU1

OU1 - Site 4    LANDFILL WEST OF "D" GROUP

Site 4 is a 1-acre site located east of Macassar Road, which received approximately 10,200 tons of mixed domestic and industrial wastes from 1943 to 1960. Materials were placed in trenches, burned, and then covered with a thin layer of sandy soil. Pine trees were planted on much of the site in the early 1980s. Low levels of solvents and metals have been detected in shallow groundwater at the landfill boundaries. After significant investigation, no concentrated source area of solvents could be identified. HydroPunch samples collected during the 1995 Remedial Investigation field investigation did not detect any migration of the solvents into deeper aquifers. Polychlorinated biphenyls were found in one sediment sample at a very low concentration. The Record of Decision for remediation of this site was signed in August 1997. The selected remedy consisted of grading and capping the landfill, prohibiting use of groundwater in the adjacent area, and long-term periodic monitoring of groundwater conditions. Construction of the landfill cap was completed in July of 1998. The Navy conducts post remediation groundwater monitoring on an annual basis. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March 2013. Because site-related COCs remain in groundwater at concentrations above NJDEP groundwater quality standards, continued monitoring and reporting are required.

 

OU1 - Site 5    Landfill West of Army Barricades

Site 5 is a landfill approximately 13-acres in size and received approximately 6,600 tons of mixed domestic and industrial wastes between 1968 and 1978. Wastes included paper, glass, plastics, construction debris, pesticide and herbicide containers, containers of paint, paint thinners, varnishes, shellacs, acids, alcohols, caustics, and small amounts of asbestos. Approximately 1 acre of the site was used as a skeet shooting range. The ROD for remediation of Site 5 was signed in August 1997. Capping, institutional controls, and long-term monitoring are the components of the selected remedy. Construction of the landfill cap was completed in July 1998. Lead-impacted soil from the shot fall area of the shooter's club skeet range was disposed off site. Site inspections are currently being conducted on an annual basis. Long term groundwater monitoring is conducted every two years. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March 2013.

 

OU2

OU2 - Site 19    Paint Chip and Sludge Disposal Area

 

Paint chips and sludges from an ordnance maintenance area were disposed of, from the early 1940s until the early 1960s, in a topographic depression near Building S-34. Paint slurries and solvent residues were also discharged into an open drainage swale. The site is a 300-foot circular area; half is paved with asphalt and half is covered by gravel. The depression is 50 feet in diameter, with a depth ranging from five to 10 feet. The drainage swale runs from the depression to a small stream in the wetlands adjacent to the site. The asphalt paved portion of the site is currently used by the Navy for training of forklift operators. The ROD for remediation of Site 19 was signed by the Navy and EPA in August 1997. Excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soils and sediments, institutional controls and long-term groundwater monitoring are the components of the selected remedy. In 1998, the Navy conducted several remedial measures, including the removal of vegetation and trees from the settling basin and ditch and excavation of contaminated sediments. Following the collection of confirmatory samples, the settling basin was backfilled to surrounding grade and paved with asphalt. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March, 2013.

 

OU3

OU3 - Site 26    Explosive "D" Washout Area

Site 26, which is approximately 200 by 200 feet in size, is located at the intersection of Macassar and Midway Roads within the Mainside Area of NWS Earle. For one year in the late 1960s, the Navy used the site for the removal and recovery of ammonium picrate (known as Explosive D) from artillery shells. The water-soluble Explosive D was removed from the shells by a hot water wash and the resulting solution flowed into a cooling/settling tank inside Building GB-1. A process leaching system north of the western end of Building GB-1 was used for process waste disposal. Building GB-1 was also reportedly used by the Navy for the reconditioning of munition casings/shells. Solvents were used in the reconditioning process. The GB-1 process leaching system appears to have been used for the disposal of trichloroethene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE), or related compounds. Groundwater samples collected from the direct push investigation revealed an elongated plume of chlorinated compounds in shallow groundwater immediately southwest of Building GB-1. A contaminant plume approximately 420 feet long by 150 feet wide that is confined to an upper sand aquifer which extends to a depth of approximately 25 feet below ground surface (BGS) was reported. This upper sand aquifer is underlain by approximately 15 feet of low permeability silts and clays. The OU3 ROD, which addresses soil and groundwater contamination, was signed by the Navy and EPA in August 1998. Components of the remedy include excavation and off-site disposal of the leach tank and adjacent soils, treatment of contaminated groundwater, institutional controls, and long-term groundwater monitoring. The Navy removed the process leaching system and associated sludge immediately northwest of Building GB-1 in 1998. An air sparging/soil vapor extraction (AS/SVE) system was designed, constructed and operated to remediate groundwater contaminated with TCE and 1,2-DCE in accordance with the approved remedial action. Construction of the AS/SVE system was completed in December 2000 and the system began operating in early January 2001. The system continued operating until December 2004 at which time it was shut down due to reduced groundwater contaminant concentrations. The Navy completed four quarters of post-operational groundwater sampling in 2005. Significant rebound of TCE and 1, 2-DCE concentrations was not observed during the year-long monitoring. An additional four rounds of groundwater monitoring were completed by the Navy over the next five years. An evaluation to determine if additional operation of the AS/SVE is required is being conducted.

 

OU4

OU4 - Site 14    Defense Property Disposal Office Warehouse (Mercury Spill Area)

One to several ounces of mercury was spilled on a concrete floor within the Defense Property Disposal Office Warehouse in 1970. The Navy reportedly cleaned up the spill with a vacuum at the time of the spill. As part of the 1996 RI, floor-sweeping samples were consolidated and analyzed for mercury. Mercury was detected at 8.6 mg/kg in the collected floor sweepings, which is below the State of New Jersey Residential Direct Contact Soil Cleanup Criterion of 14 mg/kg. The corresponding EPA residential level, based on a Hazard Index of 1.0, was approximately equal to the detected concentration and would therefore be considered protective of human health. Based on the RI, no evidence of a wider environmental contamination or risk to human health was found. The Navy and EPA signed the ROD for OU4 in September 1999. No further action was the selected remedy for Site 14.

 

OU4 - Site 20    Grit Blast Disposal Site (Near Building 544)

 

 

Spent material (grit and paint chips containing lead and zinc) from the blasting of paint from ordnance was dumped in an open pile outside near Building 544. A portion of the site was also reportedly used by the Navy for leaching unknown liquid waste. In December 1994, the Navy excavated approximately 300 cubic yards of tainted soils from the pile. The Navy carried out additional excavation work in March 1995 in order to meet State of New Jersey residential surface soil clean-up standards. Ecological risk assessment screening concluded that potential ecological risks from the site appear to be low, not requiring any further actions. At Site 20 it was determined that there was no unacceptable risk to human health or the environment under current or planned land use however, NJDEP residential soil cleanup standards were not met for all compounds of concern. Based on this, the OU4 ROD signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999, outlined that a notation be made to the NWS Earle Master Plan indicating that further measures would be required prior to allowing unrestricted (residential) use of the site. The Site 20 designation was added by the Navy to the Master Plan in 1999. The third Five-Year Review was completed in March 2013. As noted in the most recent review, the NJDEP Residential Direct Contact Soil Remediation Standard was revised. Results from the post-removal confirmation sampling are now below the revised soil remediation standard.

 

OU4 - Site 22    Paint Sludge Disposal Site (Building D-2)

Site 22 is a former paint chip disposal area where waste sand blasting material and paint wastes were disposed. The site is located south of Building D-2 and previously consisted of approximately 50 square feet of stressed vegetation and discolored (black) soils. Contaminants of concern included cadmium, lead, petroleum hydrocarbons, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 4,4-DDT, and two phthalates. Due to the presence of elevated levels of the aforementioned contaminants, the Navy conducted a removal action in December 1996. Confirmatory soil sampling demonstrated that levels were below NJDEP Residential Direct Contact, Non-Residential Direct Contact, and Impact to Groundwater Standards. Based on these results, the OU4 ROD signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999, outlined no further remedial action for Site 22.

 

OU4 - Site 23    Paint Sludge Disposal Site (Building D-5)

The Navy reportedly used an area near Building D-5 from the early 1970s until approximately 1993 to dispose of paint sludge generated from the repainting and stenciling of torpedoes, aerial bombs, and other large ordnance. The site consists of approximately 200 square feet of ground surface west of the northwest corner of Building D-5. Based on the results of the human health risk assessment, the Navy, with EPA and NJDEP concurrence, opted to use the removal response authority suggested under CERCLA. Approximately 86 tons of contaminated soil (chemicals of concern included lead and chromium) were excavated and disposed of offsite via a removal action in December 1996. The confirmatory soil sampling demonstrated that post-removal levels were below NJDEP Residential Direct Contact, Non-Residential Direct Contact, and Impact to Groundwater Standards, except for thallium. However, the residual contamination is currently covered and not a direct contact threat since the excavation was covered with several feet of clean fill. EPA deemed the removal action to be satisfactory and complete on March 27, 1997. However, NJDEP cleanup standards were not met for all compounds of concern. Based on this, the OU4 ROD signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999, outlined that a notation be made to the NWS Earle Master Plan indicating that further measures would be required prior to allowing unrestricted (residential) use of the site. The Site 23 designation was added by the Navy to the Master Plan in 1999. The Second Five-Year Review was completed in 2008 and recommended that groundwater be sampled for TAL metals. In accordance with 2005 EPA Uniform Federal Policy for Quality Assurance Plans (UFP-QAPP), a groundwater sampling plan for Site 23 was developed. Final EPA and NJDEP approval of the proposed sampling plan was received by the Navy in July 2010. . The Third Five Year Review was completed in March, 2013. Because contaminants remain at the site at levels that do not allow for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure, future five-year reviews are required.

 

OU4 - Sites 24 and 25    Closed Pistol Ranges

 

Sites 24 and 25 are closed pistol ranges located within the Mainside Area that were once used for target practice. Due to the site's similar nature, history, and close proximity, Sites 24 and 25 were investigated together during the RI. Lead- and copper-jacketed bullets were fired into 70-foot berms (natural sand banks) at Sites 24 and 25 as part of target practice exercises. Human health and ecological risk assessments concluded no further action would be required. However, based on the volume of bullets present and good housekeeping policy, the Navy, with EPA and NJDEP concurrence, decided to perform a cleanup action in 1996. Approximately 10 tons of metal bullets were mechanically removed from the soil and the soil itself was washed. Approximately 1,500 tons of soils were processed during this action. The recovered bullets were sold to a local metal recycler. Lead-containing sludge from the soil washing system was sent to an asphalt batch plant for recycling. The washed soils were backfilled at each site and the wash water was discharged to the NWS Earle wastewater treatment plant for final processing. Confirmatory soil samples collected after the excavation was complete demonstrated residual lead levels were below New Jersey Residential Direct Contact Soil Cleanup Criteria. The ROD for OU4 was signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999. No further remedial action was outlined as the selected remedy for Sites 24 and 25.

 

OU4 - Site 27    Projectile Refurbishing Area

Site 27 is a small area located behind Building E-14 within the Mainside Area at NWS Earle. Oil-contaminated rags, paint chips, and spent sandblasting shot were disposed in this area, which was used for the refurbishing (shot-blasting, repainting, and restenciling) of projectiles. The Navy, with EPA and NJDEP concurrence, opted to use the removal response authority suggested under CERCLA. Approximately 54 tons of contaminated soil were excavated and disposed off site during a 1996 removal action. Subsequent to the initial removal, additional soil was excavated because of lead in the confirmation samples at concentrations above the NJDEP soil cleanup criterion. After removal activities, the area was covered with clean soil. EPA deemed the removal action to be satisfactory and complete on March 27, 1997. At Site 27, it was determined that there was no unacceptable risk to human health or the environment under current or planned land use however, NJDEP cleanup standards were not met for all compounds of concern. Based on this, the OU4 ROD signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999, outlined that a notation be made to the NWS Earle Master Plan indicating that further measures would be required prior to allowing unrestricted (residential) use of the site. The Site 27 designation was added by the Navy to the Master Plan in 1999. The Third Five Year Review was completed in March, 2013. The Second Five-Year Review was completed in July 2008. Because contaminants remain at the site at levels that do not allow for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure, future five-year reviews are required.

 

OU4 - Site 29    PCB Spill Site

An unknown quantity of PCBs spilled from a transformer in a storage yard north of Mainside Area Building C-16 in 1981. Within 5 days of the spill, the Navy had excavated and disposed off site over 120 cubic yards of discolored soil. A new permitted hazardous waste storage facility has been constructed on Site 29. Two new monitoring wells were installed downgradient of Site 29 because the previous wells were abandoned during construction of the storage facility. Because Site 29 is in close proximity to Site 16/F, the new monitoring wells will be retained for possible use in the Site 16/F long-term monitoring program. The ROD for OU4 was signed by the Navy and EPA in September 1999. No further remedial action was outlined as the selected remedy for Site 29.

 

OU5

OU5 - Site 13    Defense Property Disposal Office Yard

OU5 consists of Site 13, an area of fill material that extended into a marsh near the rail classification yards north of the Defense Property Disposal Office (DPDO) yard located in the Mainside area. The site covered approximately 1.7 acres, with a total landfill volume estimated at 4,000 cubic yards. An existing fence enclosed the northern portion of the Navy DPDO yard. Activities at the site reportedly included storage of scrap metals and batteries and the burial of material such as cars, trucks, electronic equipment, clothing and shoes, sheet metal, furniture, scrap metal, and batteries. Additionally, batteries were broken open at the site for lead recovery and the acid allowed to drain onto the ground. Obvious fill material was present at the ground surface at several places across the site, although NWS Earle public works employees performed a partial removal of exposed debris in the summer of 1997. The ROD for Site 13 was signed on July 2004. The selected remedy for Site 13 was an engineered low-permeability cover system that meets RCRA criteria for municipal solid waste landfills, land use controls (LUCs), and long-term groundwater monitoring. The remedy included the clearing and grubbing of vegetative growth, grading, compaction of the soils and landfill materials as necessary over the former landfill. Land use controls will be implemented by the Navy as agreed between EPA and the DOD. The LUCs will be maintained until the concentrations of hazardous substances in the soil and groundwater are at such levels to allow for unrestricted use and exposure. These LUC objectives will be implemented through mechanisms, such as the RD for LUC amended to the Base Master Plan, fencing and signage at the landfill cap, 30 years of O&M and annual status reporting for the cap, establishment of the NJDEP-compliant CEA and conduct of a site review every five years. The Final Design for the Site 13 remedy was completed in May 18, 2005. The construction began the next week and was completed in October 2005. The final inspection was held on October 27, 2005. Site inspections and long-term monitoring are conducted on an annual basis.

 

OU6

OU6 - Site 3    Landfill Southwest of "F" Group

Site 3 is an approximately five-acre former landfill located in the Mainside Area that was used by the Navy from 1960 to 1968 for the disposal of domestic and industrial wastes. Industrial wastes disposed of at Site 3 consisted of paints and paint thinners, solvents, varnishes, shellac, acids, alcohols, caustics, pesticide containers and rinse water, wood, and small amounts of asbestos. Navy records, reviewed for the IAS in 1982 indicated that the industrial wastes comprised only a small portion of the approximately 4,800 tons of waste. The OU6 ROD was signed in August 2006. The selected remedy for Site 3 included construction of a landfill cover system, institutional controls, and long-term monitoring. The impermeable cap was completed in June 2003. Access restrictions were attached to the Base Master Plan in 2004 to limit future uses of the site to prevent disturbance of the soil cover or direct contact with contaminated media. Restricted activities include excavation, vehicular traffic (off-road vehicles and bikes) and use of untreated groundwater for drinking water. A cable-type fence with appropriate warning signs was erected around the landfill to limit access to the site, to restrict human contact with contaminated landfill materials, and to protect the integrity of the soil cover. Site inspections and groundwater sampling are conducted on an annual basis. Since wastes have been left in place, site conditions and risks will be reviewed every 5 years. . The Third Five Year Review was completed in March, 2013.

 

OU6 - Site 10    Scrap Metal Yard

Site 10 is a two-acre scrap metal landfill located within the NWS Earle Mainside Area used by the Navy from 1953 to 1965 for the disposal of demilitarized metals from munitions and spent munitions cases. Only certified inert (i.e., no energetic potential remaining) materials were reported to have been disposed here. An estimated 65,000 cubic yards of material including cover soil, were disposed at the site. The disposed material consisted primarily of aluminum and steel containers. Spent grit and paint chips from the ammunition rework operations were also buried. The landfill was primarily covered with a sandy soil. The site was vegetated with grasses and scrub pines, except for the access road and an open, disturbed, vehicle turn-around area, where no vegetation existed. The OU6 ROD was signed in August 2006. Capping, institutional controls, and long-term groundwater monitoring are the components of the selected remedy. Soil capping was completed in June 2003. Site inspections and groundwater sampling are conducted on an annual basis. Long-term periodic groundwater monitoring is currently conducted to assess contaminant status and potential threats to human health and the environment. Since wastes have been left in place, site conditions and risks will be reviewed every 5 years. . The Third Five Year Review was completed in March 2013.

 

OU7

OU7 - Site 26    PCE Plume

Operable Unit 7 consists of the tetrachloroethene (PCE) portion of the Site 26 groundwater solvent plume southwest of Building GB-1 which is situated at the intersection of Macassar and Midway Roads within the Mainside area of NWS Earle. There are two OUs defined within the solvent plume in Site 26 groundwater southwest of Building GB-1. OU3 consists of the portion of the solvent plume southwest of Building GB-1 that is composed primarily of TCE and 1,2-DCE. A feasibility study and a ROD have been completed for OU3. Active remediation to remove the solvent components of the plume has been underway by the Navy since January 2001 in accordance with the ROD for OU3. The estimated PCE component of the solvent plume at Site 26 (that is, OU7) overlaps, and partially coincides, with the estimated OU3 solvent plume currently under active remediation. Phase II activities included a soil gas survey, installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells, and surface and subsurface soil sampling. The Phase II RI was initiated in 1995 and completed in July 1998, when the final RI Addendum report was released. The Navy, with EPA and NJDEP, selected limited action, institutional controls, and long-term monitoring as its preferred alternative. The OU7 ROD and Remedial Design for Land Use Controls Site 26 PCE Plume document were finalized in January 2007. Final EPA approval and signature of the OU7 ROD was received in August 2007. The Second Five-Year Review was completed in July 2008. The Navy completed groundwater monitoring in accordance with the Annual Report for Four Post-Operation Groundwater Sampling Rounds in 2005 that recommended the that four additional rounds of groundwater sampling for monitoring natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons be conducted over the next five years. An evaluation to determine if additional operation of the AS/SVE is required is being conducted.

 

OU8

OU8 - Site 1    Former Ordnance Demilitarization Site

Site 1 is a six acre open field that was used for ordnance demolition between 1943 and 1975. During site abandonment, the area was plowed, and a layer of diesel-soaked hay was burned on site to remove any residual from the burning/detonation of ordnance. Site 1 is bordered by Macassar Road to the east, a railroad spur to the north, and an 8- to 10-foot-high berm to the west and south. No drainage swales or streams are located on the site. The Phase I and II activities at Site 1 included the installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells, and sampling of surface soil and subsurface soil. The Phase II Site Investigation indicated low levels of metals, explosives, and organics in the soil and groundwater at Site 1. Additional soil and groundwater samples taken during the 1995 RI delineated the extent of the affected area. The Site 1 ROD was signed in September 2004. The remedy for Site 1 addresses groundwater contamination, including arsenic, by instituting land use controls, long-term monitoring, and five-year reviews. The Base Master Plan was amended to add a notice to future land owners stating that arsenic has been detected at a concentration above the NJDEP residential direct contact cleanup criteria in subsurface soil. The Second Five-Year Review was completed in July 2008. Because contaminants remain on the site, a review of site conditions and risks will be conducted every five years, as required by CERCLA. The Navy received NJDEP comments on the Draft CEA Documentation for Site 1 in June 2008. In 2009, the Navy prepared a UFP-SAP for additional groundwater sampling. An initial groundwater sampling event was completed in 2009 (Tetra Tech, 2009) and the results submitted to EPA and NJDEP. NJDEP has indicated that a CEA for Site 1 is no longer required. Based on comments received from the EPA, the Navy elected to replace three existing monitoring wells and conduct further groundwater sampling in 2010 and 2011. Based on these groundwater sampling results, additional groundwater monitoring is not required. The Third Five Year review was completed in March, 2013.

 

Draft OU8 - Site 11    Contract Ordnance Disposal Area

Site 11 is a two acre site that was used for burning/detonation of obsolete ordnance material for several years. Obsolete ordnance could include munitions with an expired shelf life or unknown munitions such as explosives recovered from a public place or munitions captured abroad and transported to the U.S. for study and eventual disposal. Typically, disposal of ordnance or munitions consists of detonation or burning the unwanted material above ground or in a trench. No explosives remain after the disposal process. The site was occasionally used from 1974 to 1977 for firefighting training exercises. Training activities took place in two unlined pits, approximately 20 feet long. During firefighting training, reject vehicles were soaked with fuel or waste oil and ignited and then extinguished. Unburned fuel and waste oil used for ignition were allowed to evaporate or soak into the soil. The Phase I and II activities at Site 11 included the installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells and sampling of soil. Some soil samples had low total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) detections, but no explosive compounds were detected. Groundwater analyses indicated no pesticides, PCBs, or explosives. Concentrations of most metals in groundwater were similar to background levels. The Site 11 ROD was signed in September 2004. Based on the RI findings, no further action or future monitoring is warranted at Site 11. Remediation of soil at this site was determined to be undesirable since it would interfere with propagation of Knieskern’s Beaked Rush, an endangered plant species. The Navy currently mows Site 11 on an annual basis to facilitate plant propagation.

 

OU9

OU9 - Site 6    Landfill West of Normandy Road

Site 6 is a four acre area used between 1943 and 1965 to dispose of refuse consisting of dunnage lumber, glass, paper, packing material, and small amounts of paint and solvent from the Waterfront area. It was reported that the wastes were burned before they were covered, and an estimated 2,500 tons of waste were deposited annually at the landfill. The landfill area may have been part of a salt marsh before disposal began. Surface stabilization work was performed at the landfill by the Navy in 1999. The work included delineation of adjacent wetlands to determine boundaries for the stabilization, clearing and removal of brush and trees, placement of additional soil cover, and grading and seeding of the area to stabilize the northern slope of the site. Currently, the majority of the landfill surface is paved or covered with buildings. The remainder of the landfill surface is 3 to 10 feet higher than the adjacent marsh and wetland areas, and the toe of the landfill is covered with vegetation. The ROD for OU9 was finalized by the Navy and EPA in September 2007. As outlined in the ROD the selected remedy for Site 6 relies on long-term monitoring and institutional controls to limit exposures to site risks. Long-term periodic groundwater monitoring will be conducted to assess contaminant status and potential threats to human health and the environment. Since landfill constituents would remain in the groundwater, site conditions and risks would be reviewed every 5 years. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March, 2013 and included Site 6.

 

OU9 - Site 12    Battery Acid Spill Site (i.e., Battery Storage Area)

Site 12 is a paved area next to the loading dock east of Building R-10 which is located in the Waterfront Area. The site was used as a temporary staging area for forklift batteries being sent off site to be reclaimed. The storage area occupied various portions of the paved area at different times but was generally limited to approximately 7,500 to 10,000 square feet at the northern end of the paved area adjacent to Building R-10. Elevated lead levels were found in soil samples collected from the site. Based on the sampling results, the Navy conducted soil excavation activities in 1999. The site was subsequently backfilled with clean fill and graded. The OU9 ROD outlined no further action as the selected remedy at Site 12. The previously conducted excavation of contaminated soils at Site 12 achieved the remediation goal for protection of human health and the environment, including prevention of human exposure to contaminated surface and subsurface soils (removed) and migration of contaminants to the adjacent marsh.

 

OU9 - Site 15    Sludge Disposal Area

The Site 15 sludge disposal area occupied a small drainage swale (approximately one acre in size) along former railroad tracks near the main entrance to the Waterfront area. In the early 1970s, the site was used for disposal of an unknown amount of oily bilge sludge. It is estimated that over 5,000 gallons of sludge, which may have ranged from 1 percent to 25 percent oil, may have been disposed at the site. The exact location of the sludge disposal activities was not apparent during site inspections. The site is currently wooded and covered with heavy vegetation. The ROD for OU9 was signed by the Navy and EPA in September 2007. The Navy, with EPA and NJDEP, has selected long-term monitoring and institutional controls to limit exposures to site risks at Site 15. Fencing and signage around the perimeter of the site will provide notification and limit access to the site. Access restrictions would be placed in the Base Master Plan to limit future uses of the site that may result in direct contact with contaminated soil. Based on past sampling events no organic contamination was found in groundwater at a level of significant concern. The site had been isolated by the existing security fencing and protected against further dumping or spill activity for a number of years before the RI activities were carried out in the 1990s. Long-term periodic monitoring and five-year reviews will assess soil contaminant status and potential threats to human health and the environment. Since waste constituents will remain in place, five-year reviews will provide interim protection by prohibiting use of the site until soil cleanup criteria are achieved. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March, 2013 and included Site 15.

 

OU9 - Site 17    Disposal Site Behind Training Barge

The Site 17 former landfill occupies three acres in the Waterfront area, adjacent to a tidal marsh in the Ware Creek drainage basin. The site was reportedly used for the disposal of wood, heavy equipment, empty paint cans, and construction debris. The former landfill surface is covered with gravel and pavement for use as a parking area for Navy personnel working at the Waterfront area. The OU9 ROD recommends long-term monitoring and institutional controls to limit exposures to site risks at Site 17. Long-term periodic groundwater monitoring would be conducted to assess contaminant status and potential threats to human health and the environment. Since landfill constituents would remain in the groundwater, site conditions and risks would be reviewed every five years. Institutional controls would be enacted to preclude use of untreated groundwater for drinking water. The Third Five-Year Review was completed in March, 2013 and included Site 17.

 

OU10

OU10 - Site 7    Landfill South of "P" Barricades

Site 7, the Landfill South of "P" Barricades, is a five acre site that from 1965 to 1977, was used for the disposal of municipal-type solid waste and waste from Waterfront industrial operations. The disposed materials consisted of munitions shipping wastes (dunnage, packing), shop wastes from the Waterfront Public Works Shop and the Munitions Handling Laboratory (glass, wood, and small quantities of waste paint, thinners, and solvents), and domestic refuse. The waste materials were covered with loose sand quarried from the surrounding area. The site is characterized as an open area surrounded by woodlands and wetlands. The landfill is primarily covered with sandy soil and vegetated with white pines and various grasses. An unpaved road borders the site to the north, west, and south. During the 1993 RI/FS, groundwater samples showed low levels of metals and volatile organic compounds. Groundwater sampling performed in April 2005 and July 2009 showed that VOC concentrations were below State of New Jersey GWQS. Three inorganics, aluminum, iron, and manganese were present at levels above GWQS. However, manganese was also detected in an upgradient well at a level significantly above its respective GWQS. These metals are considered secondary drinking water standards and are not considered a substantial risk to human health. Data collected during the 1993 RI/FS and the 1996 RI indicate that potential risk to ecological receptors is negligible at Site 7. The FS for Site 7 was finalized in July 2008. The Proposed Remedial Action Plan and ROD for Site 7 were completed in 2010. As outlined in the ROD, the selected remedy for Site 7 is no action.

 

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