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No Further Action AOCs

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EPIC AOC 1 - E Street and Marsh Road Ground Scarring

EPIC AOC 1 is located in the northernmost area of SJCA, near the intersection of E Street and Marsh Road. AOC 1 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. In the EPIC study interpretation of the 1937 aerial photograph, this AOC was identified as a possible waste disposal area. Ground scarring, both north and south of Marsh Road, was apparent in the photograph. The area north of Marsh Road was approximately 200 feet by 150 feet, and the area south of Marsh Road was approximately 125 feet by 80 feet. By 1949, the date of the subsequent EPIC photograph, the area had been developed and Buildings 182 and 181 were constructed north of and over part of the scarring. The observation of marine shell fragments in the soil during a site visit in November 1999 indicated that the area had possibly been filled with dredge material.

An electromagnetic (EM) geophysical survey and surface soil and subsurface soil sample collection were conducted in 2001 as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA). Seven of the eight anomalies observed during the EM geophysical survey were attributed to utilities or other underground features. Inorganics, three pesticides (DDD, DDE, and DDT), 19 SVOCs (including 17 PAHs), and one VOC (methylene chloride) were detected in surface soil samples. Five pesticides, one PCB (aroclor-1260), 17 SVOCs (mostly PAHs), and two VOCs (acetone and methylene chloride) were measured in subsurface soil samples.

The results of the investigation were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS). Based on the HHRS, the SSA recommended further evaluation of surface soil. Additional consideration for ecological impacts to Blows Creek from PAHs was also recommended. The SJCA Partnering Team considered the site for NFA but decided that additional desktop review of the site was necessary.

A Site Investigation (SI) of AOC 1 was conducted in August 2003 and included surface soil sampling. Based on the HHRS, no unacceptable risks to humans exposed to constituents in soil at AOC 1 were identified. The ERS results suggested very little potential for PAHs originating from AOC 1 to be transported to Blows Creek. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was recommended for AOC 1. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA in May 2004.

 

EPIC AOC 2 - Piers in Front of Building 83

EPIC AOC 2 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. A review of a 1974 EPIC photograph showed storage of materials, possibly ordnance, in rows approximately 150 feet long in the fenced area immediately adjacent to the pier. Storage of items in this manner was not evident in photographs after 1976. In 1977, all SJCA ordnance operations/processes were moved to the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown. Additionally, releases have not been reported for this EPIC AOC. Since EPIC AOC 2 was identified in June 1999 through a review of historical aerial photographs, no sampling has been conducted.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a work-in-progress meeting that was held and a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Based on a review of current and past conditions and the location of EPIC AOC 2, it was determined that sampling was not warranted.

Based upon available information and a July 2001 site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 2 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and requires no further action (NFA).

 

EPIC AOC 3 - Ground Scarring at Building M-5

EPIC AOC 3 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Ground scarring was identified east of Building M-5 on the April 1949 aerial photograph. The area of scarring was roughly circular and approximately 70 feet in diameter. The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon review of current and past conditions and location of this EPIC AOC through additional evaluation of aerial photographs, it was confirmed that the ground scarring was fill material. Review of subsequent aerial photographs indicated that the SJCA facility was extended into this area east of Building M-5. This was evident in the 1937 photograph, which showed an extension of the facility to the east of Building M-5. It was concluded that sampling was not warranted for this site.

Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 3 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and requires no further action (NFA).

 

EPIC AOC 4 - Parking Area South of Building M-1

EPIC AOC 4 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Soil staining and possible storage tanks were identified in a parking area located south of Building M-1 during the EPIC Study in a May 1958 aerial photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team and it was concluded that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, EPIC AOC 4 was determined not to pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 

EPIC AOC 5 - Possible Soil Staining Between Buildings 87 and 88

EPIC AOC 5 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Areas of possible dark staining between Buildings 87 and 88 (located in the central part of the industrial area of the Annex) were identified in a 1964 photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team. Areas of standing water were observed and grading of the area did not achieve proper drainage. Based on additional review of aerial photographs and evaluation of past and present site conditions, the areas appeared to be ponded water. Therefore, sampling was not warranted.

During a July 2001 site visit, the area was mixed grass and gravel, no standing water was observed, and there were no indications of current or historical contamination in the area. Based upon the available information and site visit, it was the consensus of the SJCA Partnering Team that EPIC AOC 5 does not pose a risk to human health or the environments and no further action (NFA) was required.

 

EPIC AOC 6 - Ground Scarring East of Side 2

EPIC AOC 6 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site, located to the west of Cradock Street across from Site 2, was identified as a possible ground scarring and waste disposal area from a 1964 aerial photograph. A review of a March 1963 photograph showed no activity at this location. However, aerial photographs from May 1970 and onwards, showed the presence of a high voltage transmission tower in the disturbed area shown in the 1964 photograph.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Based on additional review of aerial photographs and evaluation of past and present site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached that EPIC AOC 6 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 

EPIC AOC 7 - City of Portsmouth Outgrant Area

EPIC AOC 7 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This area is located just off of Victory Avenue and outside the main gate of SJCA in the City of Portsmouth outgrant area. It was identified during the EPIC Study from a 1974 aerial photograph as a storage area. In a 1985 photograph, rows of mounded material were observed. This material was thought to be truckloads of soil staged for filling of the area. By 1986, there was evidence of scarring and ground disturbance as well as mounded material, indicating that filling activities had begun.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached that EPIC AOC 7 does not pose a threat to human health or the environment and no further action (NFA) was required.

 

EPIC AOC 8 - Possible Waste Disposal/Bulk Storage Area

EPIC AOC 8 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site is located northeast of and adjacent to Building 176. EPIC AOC 8 was identified in the EPIC study interpretation of the 1974 aerial photograph as a possible bulk storage area or waste disposal area. The area is flat and currently is covered with grass. It is approximately 300 feet long by 60 feet wide. No activity has been identified at this location in either earlier or later photographs.

In November 1999, a site visit was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Through a review of current and past conditions and the location of this EPIC AOC, it was determined that sampling was warranted.

Accordingly, surface soil and subsurface soil samples were collected and an electromagnetic (EM) survey was conducted to delineate the site boundary, locate possible waste such as buried drums and metallic debris, and characterize the soil profile above the water table. Three anomalies were identified during the survey. One anomaly appeared to be caused by above-ground features (existing fence and metal structures) and two anomalies were due to small buried man-made objects.

The sampling results were used during the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002 to conduct a human health and ecological risk screening. No human health concerns were found for exposure to surface soil and subsurface soil and no further evaluation of ecological effects was recommended. Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, consensus was reached for no further action (NFA).

 

EPIC AOC 9 - Ground Scarring South of Building 75

EPIC AOC 9 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. Aerial photography from February 1976 showed ground scarring under the steam line next to the railroad tracks. This area is relatively small, approximately 40 feet by 40 feet, and is located about 75 feet southwest of Building 75. This EPIC AOC was also identified in previous 1970s and early 1980s photographs.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit that was conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, the "ground scarring" appeared to be due to steam from the overhead steam lines. It was determined that sampling was not warranted.

Based upon the available information and a July 2001 site visit, EPIC AOC 9 was not considered to pose a risk to human health and the environment and consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached.

 

EPIC AOC 10 - Ground Scarring in Wharf Area

EPIC AOC 10 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This area was identified as "ground scarring" from a June 1986 aerial photograph. It is located in the area of the Wharf, south of the east corner of Building M-5. Photographs from 1974 indicated that this area was the former location of Buildings 244, 245, and 256. The scarring was probably the result of demolition of these buildings between 1974 and 1986.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted. Based upon the available information and a site visit in July 2001, EPIC AOC 10 was not considered to pose a risk to human health and the environment and consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached.

 

EPIC AOC 11 - Open Storage Area Northeast of Building 55

EPIC AOC 11 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. From 1985 and 1986 aerial photographs, this area was identified as an area of open storage of drums and material at Building 55 between the railroad tracks and the road. There is no evidence of storage in this area in previous or subsequent photographs.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. Upon further review of aerial photographs and evaluation of current and past site conditions, it was determined that sampling was not warranted.

In July 2001, a site visit was conducted and the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus that EPIC AOC 11 does not pose a risk to human health and the environment. Review of aerial photographs from before 1985 and after 1986 showed no evidence of this area being used to store drums and other materials. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was required at the site.

 

EPIC AOC 12 - Sandy Flat

EPIC AOC 12 was identified for investigation during a review of historical aerial photographs (EPIC Study) of the facility in June 1999. This site is located north of Buildings M-1 and M-5, directly adjacent to Blows Creek. It is a sandy, flat area next to the railroad tracks and it is approximately 240 feet long by 70 feet wide. In a 1937 aerial photograph, the area appeared as a marsh. By 1949, the area was devoid of vegetation. In the 1961 and 1964 photographs, a dark mounded material was noted in the area. None of the photographs showed storage or waste disposal activities. The area is still non-vegetated with sandy soil at the surface.

The site was further evaluated in November 1999, during a site visit conducted by the SJCA Partnering Team. During the site visit, marine shell fragments were observed in the soil, which indicates that the area had been filled during development of the area. Due to the lack of vegetation in the area for extended periods of time, this EPIC AOC was proposed for additional investigation in 2001.

In 2001, surface soil and subsurface soil samples were collected and an electromagnetic (EM) survey was conducted to delineate the site boundary, locate possible waste such as buried drums and metallic debris, and characterize the soil profile above the water table. Four anomalies were identified during the survey. One anomaly was probably due to partially buried concrete blocks, two anomalies were most likely caused by buried man-made objects, and one anomaly appeared to be due to the adjacent railroad tracks.

The analytical data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screenings as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. The human health risk screening (HHRS) concluded that contact with EPIC AOC 12 surface and subsurface soil was not expected to be a concern. In addition, no significant potential ecological effects were identified. Therefore, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) at EPIC AOC 12.

 

AOC 13 - PCP Dip Tank

AOC 13 was identified during a December 2001 interview with former employees. AOC 13 is located in an open bay of Building M-3. Two pentachlorophenol (PCP) dip tanks were located on the western wall of the open bay and were reportedly in operation for approximately two years (1951-1953) during the Korean War. Conveyor belts extended through the bay wall into the tanks. No known releases have occurred at this site.

During site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 by the Tier I SJCA Partnering Team, no evidence of staining on the concrete floor or other signs of releases were observed. However, based upon a lack of information on the location of drying operations, the Tier I SJCA Partnering Team decided that the site warranted investigation. No previous investigations have been conducted at AOC 13.

Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health or ecological risks were identified, therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

 

AOC 14 - Building 89

AOC 14 is located at the former Building 89 location. Building 89 was used for loading projectiles, including 8-inch and 16-inch shells with Explosive D compounds (a mixture of organic nitrated compounds and combustible materials such as hydrocarbons and aluminum powder). The building was demolished sometime after 1999. A review of the available maps did not indicate that drainage lines were present in the building. No known releases are associated with this site and no contaminant releases were identified during demolition activities. The site currently consists of a grass-covered field. The SJCA Partnering Team decided to investigate AOC 14 to determine the absence or presence of contamination. No previous investigations have been conducted.

Soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health risks were identified. Although the ecological risk screening (ERS) concluded that there may be the potential for chemicals in onsite surface soils to be transported to the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River, it is unlikely chemicals originating from AOC 14 would reach the River. Therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

 

AOC D - Storm Water Outfalls

AOC D consists of 35 storm water outfalls identified at SJCA. None of the outfalls are connected to sanitary sewers. The outfalls are listed as an AOC based on past releases from waste management areas located near storm water drains, lines and outfall structures. The storm water outfalls will be investigated under CERCLA on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations may include sampling various outfalls to determine whether there has been a release of hazardous constituents.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA under CERCLA, as the storm water outfalls will be investigated under CERCLA on a site-specific basis. Site-specific investigations may include sampling various outfalls to determine whether there has been a release of hazardous constituents.

 

AOC E - Temporary Pump Storage

AOC E is located at Building 104 and is used to temporarily store generators, pumps, and heavy equipment. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, noted that lubricating oil had leaked from one of the pumps onto the bare ground. The leaking pump was removed and placed on the concrete foundation of Building 104.

AOC E was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction and requires no further action (NFA).

 

AOC F - Underground Storage Tanks

AOC F consists of nine underground storage tanks (USTs). The tanks are constructed from steel, concrete, and fiberglass, and are located at Buildings 113, 201 (two tanks), 263, 266, 271, and 283 (three tanks). The capacity of the tanks ranges from 250 to 8,000 gallons. The tanks are approximately 25 to 45 years old.

According to the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted in 1989, several tanks were reportedly out of service but still in place; others were being used for storage of refined fuels (diesel and gasoline). However, AOC F requires no further action (NFA) as the USTs are managed under the Navy'’s UST Program.

 

AOC G - Former Process Buildings

AOC G consists of former process buildings located throughout SJCA. The former process buildings include structures where various processes and operations were performed; some of which were suspected to have generated hazardous constituents. Some of the structures included under AOC G no longer exist and some structures still exist but are no longer conducting process operations. A comprehensive list of existing and non-existing former process buildings is not available. It is also not known whether buildings were cleaned or decontaminated prior to being torn down or the type of waste management practices that were implemented at the buildings.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) under CERCLA, however, as new information becomes available on the locations and processes conducted at former process buildings, the SJCA Partnering Team will determine if new AOCs should be added. Any former process buildings identified for further evaluation will be evaluated on a site-specific basis.

 

AOC J - Former Ammunition Manufacturing Areas

AOC J consists of former areas used for manufacturing ammunition. Buildings in which ammunition is believed to have been handled include Buildings 12, 13, 14, 18, 29 (which has been torn down, and was formerly adjacent to the east end of M-2), 32, 32A, 33 (these three buildings were located between Buildings 17, 38, and 39), 39, 41, 43, 46, 47, 89, 180, 184, 185, 188, 190, 193, 222 (Victory Building located between Site 5 and Blows Creek), 240 through 246, 256, 267, M-3, M-4, M-5, and M-5 Annex. According to the Initial Assessment Study (IAS), different sizes and types of ammunition were loaded with black powder, smokeless powders, Explosive D, trinitrotoluene (TNT), Composition A-3, and tetryl in these areas since 1898. It is not known whether these areas were cleaned or decontaminated prior to being decommissioned as ammunition manufacturing areas.

The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA) under CERCLA, however, as new information becomes available on the manufacturing areas, the SJCA Partnering Team will determine if new AOCs should be added. Any former ammunition manufacturing areas identified for further evaluation will be evaluated on a site-specific basis.

 

AOC K - Former Sewage Treatment Plant

AOC K consists of a former sewage treatment plant (STP). The plant was initially identified in the 1981 Initial Assessment Study (IAS) as a small STP located proximal to Building 318. The plant operated from 1942 to 1947 and the waste handled at this unit reportedly consisted of treated wastewater from the onsite barracks. An inspection of the site where the plant was reportedly located did not reveal any evidence of its existence.

The SJCA Partnering Team determined that AOC K warranted further investigation based upon the potential for mercury contamination from trickling filters that may have been part of the STP process. No previous investigations have been conducted at AOC K.

Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected during a Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in August 2003. No unacceptable human health or ecological risks were identified, therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team in May 2004.

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