Environmental

No Further Action IRP Sites

fileENV Installation HomeInstallation MapVirginia
PrintHome PageSite DescriptionsCommunity OutreachAdministrative RecordsLinks

 

This page contains ALL No Further Action IRP Sites. Please scroll down to locate site.

Site 1 - Waste Disposal Area A

Site 1 consisted of a one-acre area east of the Dominion-Virginia Electric Power Company Right-of Way, west of a set of railroad tracks, and north of Building 146. The waste disposal area was reportedly used from 1921 to 1924 for the disposal of trash and garbage, including pesticides, acids, and bases. It was reported that trash was burned at the site and the ashes used to fill the marsh area adjacent to Blows Creek. The estimated volume of disposed material prior to being burned was 30,000 cubic yards. The actual extent of waste disposal is unknown and site boundaries are approximate.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 1, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated the marsh area as containing construction rubble and lumber. A faint sheen was noted on the standing water. Further investigation of soil and groundwater was recommended.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nor radiation was present in the air.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. DDT, DDE, and several PAHs were detected in soil, and nitrobenzene was detected in the groundwater.

As part of the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) Scoring conducted in 2000, surface water and sediment samples were collected from Blows Creek in the vicinity of the waste disposal area. The downstream sample collected closest to Site 1 was described as “black sand” while other samples both upstream and downstream of the site had components of silt and organic material. Since both fine-grained material and organic material have a greater tendency to adsorb contaminants, the dominance of sand in the downstream sample was considered to bias the sample toward lower concentrations of contaminants. Furthermore, the samples were collected during rising (incoming) tide, which could have prevented representative samples from being collected. Based on the evaluation of this data, it was determined that there appeared to be data gaps that should be addressed.

In 2001, during investigations to support a Site Screening Assessment (SSA), four surface water and four sediment samples were collected from Blows Creek, north of Site 1, to address the data gaps identified during the HRS field investigation. All the analytical results were combined to conduct human health and ecological risk screenings that determined groundwater, sediment, and soil at Site 1 were not media of concern. The human health risk screening (HHRS), however, did recommend further evaluation of surface water to determine if inorganics in surface water were site-related or related to background or reference conditions in Blows Creek. No further evaluation was found to be necessary based on the ERS. It was recommended that trenching activities be conducted to determine the limits of the waste disposal area and character of the waste.

In 2002, three test pits were excavated at Site 1 and no evidence of waste was encountered. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 1 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on RRR data and the test pit results and an addendum to the SSA was submitted in 2003 that documented the closeout of Site 1.

 

Site 3 - Waste Disposal Area C

Site 3 is a former waste disposal area that covers approximately 2.1 acres in the northeastern corner of SJCA. Site 3 was originally a mudflat where refuse was allowed to burn; the ash was then used to fill the area. Operations began in 1940 and continued until 1970 and refuse reportedly disposed of included solvents, acids, bases, and mixed municipal waste in addition to trichloroethylene waste oil and oil sludges. Two pits reportedly were used for disposal of the oil and oily sludge as well as for periodic burning. Prior to burning, the total volume of waste disposed of was estimated to be 27,778 cubic yards (CY). Refuse was burned and extinguished daily with water from a fire hose. Salvageable materials were removed from the site daily and every two weeks the site was bulldozed for compaction and leveling. After 1970, the area was graded level and covered with grass.

The Remedial Investigation (RI) for Site 3 was completed in March 2003. Potential human health and ecological concerns included risk from exposure to waste and inorganics and PAHs in soil and drainage ditch sediment. The RI recommended a removal action for Site 3; including waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil; to mitigate risks and eliminate concern for continued transport of potential contaminants to Blows Creek via the site-related drainage ditches. Further evaluation of the potential for adverse effects to aquatic life in Blows Creek sediment was also recommended based on chemical concentrations of inorganics and pesticides in upland drainage ditch sediment/soil. A separate Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) for Blows Creek is currently being conducted to identify potential risk associated with possible historical contributions to Blows Creek from upland Navy IR Program sites, including Site 3.

Based on the findings of the RI, an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) was conducted to identify and analyze remedies or removal actions to mitigate potential risk at Site 3. The selected Non-Time-Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) included excavation and off-site disposal of waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil. The volume of the material and soil to be removed was estimated to be 9,204 CY and confirmatory samples were to be collected from the remaining soils at the sides and bottom of the excavated areas to verify that clean-up goals were met. The NTCRA activities at Site 3 were completed in March 2004. Approximately 9,500 CY of waste, soil, and upland drainage ditch sediment/soil were removed based on the confirmatory sample results. A Confirmation Closeout Report was completed in August 2004.

Based upon the complete removal of waste and soil at Site 3, which mitigated the potential risks to human and ecological receptors, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for closure of Site 3. The Proposed Plan (PP) for Site 3 was issued in November 2004 and identified no further action (NFA) as the preferred alternative. No public comments were received. The Final NFA Record of Decision (ROD) for Site 3 was submitted in April 2005 and signed in February 2006.

 

Site 5 - Burning Grounds

Site 5 is consisted of approximately 23-acres located in the northeastern portion of SJCA. A 4.3-acre unlined waste disposal area was located at the center of the site. Much of the Site 5 area was historically used for placement of dredge spoil material that reportedly originated from Blows Creek and the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River. Operations began at the Burning Grounds in the 1930s when waste ordnance materials were disposed of by open burning. Tetryl, trinitrotoluene (TNT), fuzes, solvents, paint sludge, pesticides, and various types of refuse were also disposed. In mid-1977, the Burning Grounds surface was used for facility-wide decontamination of ordnance equipment and material. The decontamination process included filling equipment from buildings with oil and straw and igniting them. Afterwards, the ground surface was reportedly covered with oil and straw and burned. The top 6 inches of soil was then disced, and the ground surface was covered with oil and straw and burned again. The area currently consists of an open field with a wetland in the center and a forested area and Blows Creek to the south.

RI activities indicated potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to chemicals in waste, soil, and drainage sediment. The primary contaminants identified were inorganics and pesticides. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis was conducted to evaluate alternatives to address the waste/burnt soil area and impacted surface soil and drainage sediment areas and recommended a removal action of those areas.

Blows Creek, a tidally-influenced brackish water tributary to the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River, runs along the southern extent of Site 5 and through the center of SJCA. Several IRP sites are located within the Blows Creek drainage basin and have been identified as potential historical contaminant sources to Blows Creek; therefore, the creek has been incorporated into Site 5 under the IRP. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment was conducted to determine whether historical contributions to Blows Creek from upland Navy IRP sites, including Site 5, caused adverse environmental impacts in the creek. Results indicated that no further action for Blows Creek was necessary.

A non-time critical removal action to address potential risks to human health and the environment from exposure to Site 5 waste, soil, and drainage sediment was completed in 2012.

Although the expanded RI report documented No Further Action for groundwater, a supplemental RI was conducted to evaluate shallow aquifer groundwater conditions following the Removal Action. The supplemental RI concluded that there were potential unacceptable risks to human receptors from exposure to select inorganics in the shallow aquifer groundwater. However, evaluation of the data indicated the concentrations of inorganics in the shallow aquifer groundwater were the result of naturally occurring site conditions. Therefore, No Further Action for the shallow aquifer groundwater at Site 5 was recommended.  The No Further Action Proposed Plan was submitted in 2015 and the No Further Action Record of Decision was signed in May 2016.

 

Site 6 - Small Arms Unit

Site 6 was operated as part of the ordnance disposal operations at SJCA and has also been referred to as "Caged Pit." The Small Arms Unit consisted of an 8-ft-wide by 20-ft long by 12-ft-high steel container underlain by a concrete pad, known as the caged pit. Interviews with former employees indicated that small items were transported into a steel container via a conveyor belt for destruction. Historical records do not indicate the dates of operation. A review of historical aerial photographs indicates that activities associated with Site 6 likely began around 1949 and continued through the 1980s.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 6, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated an unknown volume of small items, such as igniters and fuses, were burned in the unit. The RFA also reported that the Navy had filled in the area "during recent years" and recommended investigation of soil and groundwater.

As part of the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) System Data Collection Report in 1996, one surface soil sample was collected from Site 6. With the exception of three pesticides and one metal, the detected compounds were at concentrations below background levels.

Due to its proximity to Site 5, this site was investigated with Site 5 during the Remedial Investigation (RI) completed in 2003. RI field investigation activities at Site 6 included a geophysical survey and the collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples. No visual signs of waste or stained/burned soil were observed at Site 6; however, test pit debris (specifically pieces of concrete) may have been the remains of the pit. The Remedial Investigation/ Human Health Risk Assessment/Ecological Risk Assessment Report (RI/HHRA/ERA) identified potential human health risks associated with metals in soil. However, the highest concentrations of all compounds were detected in soil at Site 5; therefore, the identified risks would be biased high as applied to Site 6 soil. To achieve closure of Site 6, the SJCA Partnering Team agreed to conduct a complete removal of waste and soil action for Site 6.

An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) was prepared in June 2002 in response to the potential risks with soil exposure. A removal action was completed in September 2002 and included excavation of remnants of the Small Arms Unit, as well as surrounding material posing a potential risk to human health and the environment. A Closeout Report documenting the closure of Site 6 was submitted in March 2003. The no further action (NFA) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PRAP) and Record of Decision (ROD) were submitted in 2003 and the ROD was signed in September 2003.

 

Site 7 - Old Storage Yard

Site 7 consisted of a previously fenced, outdoor grassy area used to store a variety of material including anchors, chain and equipment. The initial start date for the site is unknown. The site, however, was active when the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) was conducted in 1989. During previous site investigations, 5-gallon containers of hydraulic oil, lubricating oil, lead paint, and open drums of sandblast grit were observed. There was also evidence that oil had leaked or was drained onto the soil from some of the equipment being stored at the site.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 7, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that oil had leaked or been drained from one of the pieces of equipment stored at the site. Open drums of sand blast grit were stored and observed to have spilled onto the ground surface. The RFA recommended that sources of potentially hazardous wastes or constituent releases be addressed and that surface soil samples be collected in stained areas to determine the potential for a release.

Two soil samples were collected and during the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and methylene chloride were detected in the samples. The RRR results were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS) as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. Based on the HHRS and ERS, the SJCA Partnering Team recommended no further action (NFA) for the site. Surface debris was removed in 2002 and the site was closed for NFA.

 

Site 8 - Cross and Mine

Site 8 was located near the intersection of Cross Street and Mine Road, adjacent to, and north of, Building 212 and across the street from Building M-1. From the 1950s to mid-1960s, the site was used for disposal of rinse water from mobile insecticide and herbicide spray trucks. It is estimated that 675,000 gallons of rinse water were discharged directly to the ground and allowed to infiltrate into the soil.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 8, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither VOCs nor radiation was present in the air.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the area was devoid of vegetation and recommended soil sampling.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for pesticides and PCBs. Pesticides detected in one or more soil samples include DDT, DDD, DDE, and endrin. No pesticides or PCBs were detected in groundwater.

The RRR results were used to conduct a human health risk screening (HHRS) and ecological risk screening (ERS) as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No risks were found to exist. However, concerns remained regarding the historical record of 675,000 gallons of pesticide rinse water discharged to the ground remained and the site is recommended for further study.

A Site Investigation (SI) was conducted at Site 8 in 2003. The investigation consisted of the installation of direct-push probes for the collection of grab groundwater samples to determine the presence or absence of pesticides using analytical field test kits. Based on the test kit results and previous RRR results, four shallow monitoring wells were installed and groundwater samples were collected. Based on the HHRS, no unacceptable risks to humans exposed to constituents in soil at Site 8 were identified and the ERS results suggested a minimal potential for adverse effects to aquatic life from the presence of pesticides in groundwater. Therefore, no further action (NFA) was recommended for Site 8. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for NFA at Site 8 in May 2004.

 

Site 9 - Building 249

Several activities were conducted at Building 249 including, pest control, oil/water separation, and a washrack. The washrack was located at the east end of Building 249 and was a single concrete wash pad which was divided into two separate stalls. One stall was rebuilt in approximately 1981 and the other was constructed in 1986. Each stall measured approximately 15 feet by 40 feet and was surrounding by 6 inch to 8 inch concrete berms. One stall was used to remove grease and the other was used to rinse non-greasy items. The unit was located outdoors and was not covered.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981 identified that from the mid-1960s to 1976, the wash pad was used for cleaning pesticides and herbicides out of mobile spray tanks. Wastes managed at Site 9 also included solvent wastewater from rinsing various types of equipment. Prior to 1976, the wash pad waste discharged toward the southern end of the wash pad and into a storm drain which discharged to a swampy area that discharged to St. Juliens Creek. In 1976, the discharge stream was redirected to a sanitary sewer. Oily sludge was observed on the soil beyond the secondary containment of the pad.

During the IAS, Building 249 was used for storing a variety of unused equipment and pesticides, but was mostly empty. Three 55-gallon drums and one bag of pesticides were being stored in the building during the IAS. The drums and bags contained pesticides including Malathion, Exxon XD 3-30, Ortho VOKK 70, and diazinon. The IAS revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 9, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

In 1983, a Preliminary Assessment (PA) was conducted and indicated that neither VOCs nor radiation was present in the air.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the discharge from the area was being directed to an oil/water separator located adjacent to the wash pad. The separator was a subgrade, concrete, open-top tank with a metal grating cover. Rinsate and washdown material from the wash pad were collected in the separator. The RFA states that SJCA personnel reportedly pumped sludge on a periodic basis from the bottom of the separator into a vacuum truck. The sludge was transported offsite for final disposal. Excess water was directed to a POTW conduit via a level control outlet. It is not known when the oil/water separator was installed. No evidence of release from the separator was noted. The building was being used as a repair and maintenance shop for vehicles at the facility. Building 249 contained heavy equipment, vehicles needing repair, tools, and operational areas (e.g., solvent baths) normally found in automotive garages. The RFA recommended management practices to control waste runoff.

Site 9 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction (Building 1556). Site 9 was closed for no further action (NFA), as documented in the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA).

 

Site 10 - Waste Disposal at Railroad Tracks and Swale Beneath Building 13

Site 10 was located in the vicinity of Building 13 and was a reported disposal location for wastes generated during hardware cleaning operations from pre-1940 to the mid-1970s. Wastes handled at this location included Alodine (a caustic detergent), methyl ethyl ketone, and acetone. It was also reported that liquid wastes were poured on the railroad tracks, though no evidence of a release has been observed. The railroad track is currently inactive.

The SJCA Partnering Team determined that SWMU 31 (the swale beneath Building 13) should be addressed as part of Site 10.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 10, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that Building 13 was a well-maintained machine shop and no evidence of release was observed. However, soil sampling was recommended to determine if hazardous constituents had been released. SWMU 31 was identified in the RFA as a swale that ran under Building 13 and eventually drained into St. Juliens Creek. Rinsate generated from the washing of smokeless powder cans that were washed in Buildings 13 and 47 was emptied into the swale. During the RFA, neither the swale area nor any evidence of contamination such as staining or stressed vegetation were found. Facility representatives indicated that they did not know of a swale in this area.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to a variety of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and methylene chloride were detected in the soil; however concentrations were below the quantitation limit of the analytical instruments. The groundwater contained low levels of trichloroethene.

During meetings/site visits conducted in November 1999 and February 2000, it was observed that the former swale located between Buildings 13 and 199/278 (Sites 10 and 17, respectively) was paved. The former swale would have traversed Site 17 and Site 2, currently under the Remedial Investigation (RI) process. Historical photographs show that this area has been paved since 1949.

Site 10 was included in the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) conducted in 2002. Human health and ecological risk screenings were conducted using the RRR data and it was determined that groundwater and surface soil at Site 10 do not pose a concern to human health and do not warrant further evaluation. The SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus during a site visit in July 2001 that Site 10 required no further action (NFA).

 

Site 11 - Waste Disposal at Building 53 (formerly Building 266)

Site 11 was located at Building 53 (formerly referred to as Building 266), which was the facility electrical shop located in the industrial area east of Cradock Street. Station electricians reportedly used 5 gallons of trichloroethene per month at the site. Most of the solvent evaporated, but the remainder was disposed on the railroad track bed adjacent to Building 53.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 11, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the building had been converted to a recreation room and no evidence of waste disposal around the building was found. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. Surface soil contained DDT, DDE, dieldrin, endrin, and aroclor-1260. Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected at concentrations below the instrument quantitation limit. Methylene chloride and trichloroethene were both detected (below the quantitation limit) at a concentration of approximately 6 ppb. The groundwater sample contained several metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,2-dichloroethene (total) (100 ppb), methylene chloride (11 ppb), and trichloroethene (46 ppb).

The RRR data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screens as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No surface soil human health risks were found for one of the two soil samples. Groundwater VOC results, however, were above the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). No additional ecological evaluation was recommended in the SSA. Due to its proximity to Site 21 where trichloroethene was also detected in a site groundwater sample, VOCs in Site 11 groundwater will be addressed under further investigation of groundwater at Site 21. Consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team during the July 2001 site visit.

 

Site 12 - Sand Blast Area Building 323

Site 12 was located at Building 323 where sand blasting operations were conducted. It is not known when sand blasting operations began at Site 12. Wastes at the site consisted of waste blast grit and particulates removed from the items being blasted (e.g., paint, metal).

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the building consisted of bare floors and a metal shed which was covered, divided into two stalls, and open at two ends. No release controls were in place at the unit, although there was a roof and several walls to help confine particulate waste as it was generated. It was stated that additional barriers were being planned for installation in the future to prevent particulate waste grit from escaping the building. Sand blast waste was observed on the ground surrounding Building 323 and it was recommended that it be assessed to determine if there were hazardous constituents associated with the material.

Site 12 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 12 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on the removal action.

 

Site 13 - Waste Generation Area

Site 13 was a fenced concrete pad used to store waste liquids (e.g., battery acid, lacquer thinner, antifreeze, and lube oils) prior to being sent to the waste accumulation area. The pad measured approximately 20 feet by 20 feet and was surrounded by a 6-foot high chain-link fence. Entrance into the area was controlled by a locked gate. The concrete pad was surrounded by sand bags forming a berm. It is not known when waste storage operations began at Site 13.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that oily stains were present on the concrete pad and surrounding soil. Waste liquids were contained in closed, 55-gallon barrels. After the barrels were filled, they were relocated to the facility waste accumulation area within 72 hours of filling. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

Site 13 was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction. Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 13 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team based on the removal action.

 

Site 14 - Washrack Building 266

Site 14 was a washrack reportedly located at Building 266. The area was remediated during a removal action conducted as part of the Shore Intermediate Maintenance Activity (SIMA) facility construction (Building 1556). Consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 14 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team.

 

Site 15 - Fire Training Area

Site 15 is the fire training area located at Building 271. Site 15 consists of two adjacent celled areas which are used to train personnel to fight fires. One of the celled areas consists of a burning site where wooden pallets are soaked with diesel, ignited, and extinguished with water. The other burning site is a buried stainless steel pit measuring approximately 4-feet wide by 4-feet long by 3-feet deep. The pit was filled with diesel fuel which is ignited and extinguished using carbon dioxide. It is not known when waste storage operations began at Site 15. Wastes managed at this site include wooden pallets and diesel fuel.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that no controls structures, other than the stainless steel pit, were in place to control releases to the environment. During the RFA, blackened and stained soil was observed and ashes from the burning of the pallets were piled along the fence-line behind the fire training area. The soil where the diesel fuel was stored also was found to be stained. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released and management practices be considered.

Site 15 will be investigated under the Navy's Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. Therefore, consensus for no further action (NFA) for Site 15 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team.

 

Site 16 - Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Storage/Salvage Yard

Site 16 consists of the area surrounding Buildings 400, 168, and 173 and is a clearing house for any items excessed by the government. Wastes handled include scrap metal, old boats and vehicles, obsolete equipment, and excess hardware items. The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that Waste, including scrap stainless steel, was observed at the site. Localized oily stains were observed on several bare soil areas where machinery and equipment were stored. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released and that potential releases be addressed.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to several metals, the following organic contaminants were detected in soil: DDD, DDT, alpha chlordane, aroclor-1254, dieldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, gamma chlordane, di-n-butylphthalate, di-n-octylphthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and several PAHs. Groundwater samples from the site contained acetone and methylene chloride.

Consensus for no further action (NFA) at Site 16 was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team since the DRMO is managed under RCRA.

 

Site 17 - Storage Pad at Building 279

Site 17 is located within the industrial area of the Base, east of Cradock Street, and consists of a concrete storage pad located just outside Building 279. The storage pad was used to store two 55-gallon drums of PD-860, a commercial product used as a degreaser.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that a two gallon bucket was hanging under the tap of one of the barrels to catch drippings. The two gallon was full to overflowing and there were stains on the concrete pad and surrounding soil. The RFA recommended that the unit be referred to RCRA and suggested alternative management practices.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, surface soil and groundwater samples were collected. In addition to inorganic constituents, the following organic constituents were detected in site soils: DDD, DDE, DDT, alpha-chlordane, aroclor-1254, dieldrin, endrin, gamma-chlordane, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and several PAHs. No organic constituents were detected in the groundwater sample.

Four surface soil samples were collected and analyzed as part of an Expanded Site Investigation (SI) conducted in 2001. Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were present above background concentrations and human health and ecological screening values. The SI concluded that Site 17 may pose a risk to human health and the environment. It was recommended that an additional investigation be conducted to define the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminants and better define any potential risk.

The roof and walls of Building 278/279 were demolished in early 2003, the flooring and concrete pilings are still in place awaiting final removal. Based upon the proximity to Site 2, the SJCA Partnering Team agreed in February 2003 that further action related to Site 17 will be addressed under Site 2.

 

Site 18 - Building 47

Site 18 is located adjacent to the south wall of Building 47 and consisted of small amounts of black blasting grit on the ground surface.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, indicated that the source of the blasting grit could not be determined. Although Building 47 housed two sand blasting booths, personnel working in that building reported that they do not use black blasting grit in their machines. Therefore, the source of the material identified as grit during the RFA site visit is unknown. An air compressor was also identified at Building 47. The RFA recommended that soil samples be collected from the area to determine if hazardous constituents were released.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, a surface soil sample was collected. Inorganics as well as several SVOCs (mostly PAHs), and two VOCs (methylene chloride and trichloroethene, both at a concentration of approximately 4 ppb) were detected.

The RRR data was used to conduct a human health and ecological risk screening as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. No human health risk was identified and no further ecological evaluation was recommended. In addition, during the July 2001 SJCA Partnering Team site visit, no blast grit was observed in several hand auger borings. Consensus for no further action (NFA) was reached by the SJCA Partnering Team during the site visit.

 

Site 19 - Building 19

Site 19 consists of former Building 190 and the surrounding area. Building 190 was located just south of the mouth of Blows Creek at the confluence of the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River (Figure 1-2). The building was heavily used for loading explosives, including Explosive D and Composition A-3, into ammunition from the 1940s to the 1970s.

In mid-1977, all ordnance-handling buildings were decontaminated by flushing with chemical solutions and water. Prior to decontamination, Naval Ammunition Production Engineering Center(NAPEC)visually inspected the facilities and collected samples for chemical analysis to develop appropriate decontamination procedures for each building.

 

Site 20 - Wharf Area Sediments

Site 20 is located adjacent to the former wharf in the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River where ordnance had been reportedly dropped during loading and unloading operations.

The Initial Assessment Study (IAS) conducted at SJCA in 1981, indicated that Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team divers identified some metal and thick silt deposits in the area of the old pier. The IAS revealed that low-level concentrations of ordnance materials exist throughout the facility. However, the sites identified, which included Site 20, were determined not to pose a threat to human health and the environment, and no confirmation study was conducted.

The RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) conducted at SJCA in 1989, recommended that the facility implement a program to determine if residual ordnance exists and remedial cleanup, if necessary.

During the Relative Risk Ranking (RRR) data collection study in 1996, an underwater reconnaissance and a magnetometer survey, in which EOD divers searched the sediments, were performed in that area. The magnetometer survey identified approximately 68 buried "contacts" surrounding the former wharf pilings. Many individual "contacts" were identified in random locations between the pilings. The most significant concentration of "contacts" was along the center west side of the pilings, between the pilings and the river bank. No visual confirmation of "contacts" was made during the RRR data collection study. It is important to note that "contacts" might indicate any type of buried metal object, and does not necessarily indicate the presence of buried ordnance. Four sediment samples were collected and one explosive, 1,2-dinitrobenzene, was detected in one sediment sample. Metals, one pesticide, several PAHs, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and one VOC (methylene chloride), were detected in sediment.

The RRR data was used to conduct human health and ecological risk screens as part of the Site Screening Assessment (SSA) in 2002. Site 20 sediment was not found to pose a potential concern to human health. The ecological risk screening (ERS) concluded the potential for adverse effects to benthic organisms is likely minimal and does not warrant further evaluation. However, due to the potential for buried ordnance, signs were posted at Site 20 to prohibit intrusive activities. Additionally, the Navy placed a warning notice for potential unexploded ordnance (UXO) at Site 20 in Navy Real Estate Documents and The US Army Corps of Engineers were notified of the potential for UXO at Site 20.

During the July 2001 site visit, the SJCA Partnering Team reached consensus for no further action (NFA). The site will be managed under the Munitions Response Program (MRP).

SHARE THIS PAGE

1322 Patterson Ave. SE, Suite 1000, Washington Navy Yard, D.C. 20374-5065

  • Please read this Privacy Policy
  • GILS NUMBER DOD-USN-000702
Connect with Us