Environmental

Site Descriptions

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Environmental History

Naval Air Station (NAS) Meridian has been in operation since 1961. As a result of decades of base operations, training activities, and waste disposal practices, a total of fifteen sites have been identified at NAS Meridian where historic releases of hazardous substances have occurred.

Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) and NAS Meridian personnel have been actively working with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to identify, investigate, and cleanup these sites since the late 1980’s. As a result, significant progress has been made in the environmental restoration program at NAS Meridian over the past three decades. Remedial actions have been completed and no further action determinations have been received for 8 sites (Site 1, Site 2, Site 3B, Sites 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D, and Site 7). Remedial actions have been completed and long-term monitoring is ongoing at 3 sites (Site 3A, Site 5, and Site 6). Studies and remedial actions are currently underway for 4 sites (Site 8, Site 9, Site 10, and SAR West).

Click here for a PDF of the Site Map

NAS Meridian Installation Restoration (IR) Sites

SITE 1 – Former Firefighting Training Area

Site 1, the Former Firefighting Training Area, was in use from 1961 until 1969 when the new firefighting training area (Site 6) was constructed. A circular area at the center of the site, visible in aerial photographs from the mid-1960s, is believed to be the firefighting training pit that was used to burn JP-4 and JP-5 jet fuels and aviation gasoline, as well as waste oil and solvents generated by aircraft and vehicle maintenance activities. The burn pit was likely unlined and gravel was placed on the ground to provide a suitable surface for training activities. Approximately 1,600 gallons of fuel, waste oil, and solvents were burned each month at Site 1. The site is generally flat and grass-covered.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified carbon disulfide and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in groundwater; however, none of the detected concentrations exceeded the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Target Remediation Goal (TRG). Five metals, including aluminum, antimony, beryllium, iron, and lead were detected in groundwater above MDEQ TRGs. In soil, Aroclor-1260, arsenic, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected at concentrations exceeding the MDEQ Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs). The results of the site investigation provided the basis for conducted an interim removal action at Site 1.

An interim removal action, completed in 1996, included excavating impacted soil for off-site disposal and collecting confirmation soil samples to verify the soil removal had been successful. A review of the confirmation soil sampling results concluded that the sampling program used during the interim removal action did not conform to MDEQ guidelines in place at the time. Additional confirmatory soil sampling was conducted in 2002; only metals were detected in subsurface soil and groundwater, at concentrations that did not pose harm to human health or the environment.

The interim removal action addressed the principal threats posed by contaminants in soil at Site 1 and the site was recommended for No Further Action. The Decision Document for Site 1 was signed in 2007.

 

SITE 2 - Jet Engine Test Cell

Site 2, the Jet Engine Test Cell, consisting of a paved area of approximately 8,500 square feet, is used for testing the performance of new or repaired jet engines. Prior to 1975, waste JP-5 fuel, water, and B&B 3100 (a petroleum-based solvent used as an engine gas path cleaner) generated from site activities were collected in a trailer-mounted tank and transported offsite for disposal. Beginning in 1975, a runoff collection system and an oil/water separator (OWS) started operation collecting the jet wash related liquid waste in a concrete catch basin. The basin drained to an OWS, then the runoff from the site was discharged via a drainage swale to an intermittent stream north of the site. This stream drains into the Big Reed Creek drainage basin to the north.

Spills and leaks of waste JP-5 and B&B 3100 into the intermittent stream occurred after the runoff collection system was installed in 1975. The runoff collection system functioned intermittently prior to 1983, when it was upgraded to improve performance. Stained soils were at one time visible over an area approximately 10 feet by 50 feet near the outlet of the OWS. The area with stained soils has been repeatedly disturbed by tree logging equipment, causing significant turnover of the surface soil.

In 1997, the original OWS was replaced with a new double-wall fiberglass OWS containing a holding tank for waste oil. The waste oil is periodically removed and transported offsite for disposal. Site 2 is a relatively small, flat area located north of a paved road and surrounded by grassy areas on the northern, eastern, and western sides.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil. Only TPH and one metal (arsenic) were detected in soil at concentrations exceeding the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs).

During the expanded site investigation, completed in 2007, surface and subsurface soil samples were collected to confirm TPH concentrations observed during the site investigation and delineate soil contamination to support a removal action, if necessary. The expanded site investigation concluded that TPH concentrations observed in soil previously had naturally attenuated over the 15-year period between the two sampling events. The 2007 expanded site investigation recommended that groundwater monitoring wells be installed and sampled at Site 2.

Additional expanded site investigation activities were completed in 2008, and subsurface soil and groundwater samples were collected for VOCs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and TPH. None of the detected concentrations in soil and groundwater exceeded MDEQ uTRGs (soil) or TRGs (groundwater). No additional investigation or remedial actions were recommended for Site 2.

The investigations conducted at Site 2 evaluated the potential exposure risks to human health and the environment. The results of soil and groundwater investigations indicated there are no contaminant of concern concentrations above their respective TRGs. Because no remedial action was necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, no further action was recommended for Site 2 and a Decision Document was signed in 2009.

 

SITE 3A - Lake Martha Landfill

Site 3A, the Lake Martha Landfill, commonly referred to as the “Paper Landfill,” was operated from approximately 1968 to 1985. Trench and fill operations took place at this site during its active period. The southern section of the site contained several 50-foot by 12-foot by 10 foot-deep trenches, and the western section contained several 50-foot by 12-foot by 6-foot-deep trenches into which waste material was disposed. These trenches were backfilled with approximately 2.5 feet of fill material after operations ceased in 1985.

Wastes reportedly disposed within the Lake Martha Landfill included cardboard, brush and yard waste, construction debris, and household garbage. Numerous instances of unauthorized dumping of materials such as automobile engines, paint, and solvent cans reportedly occurred, in addition to an estimated 100 to 150 batteries and an unknown number of aerosol cans. Site 3A is wooded and not currently in use.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified acetone, carbon disulfide, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, di-n-butylphthalate, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil; however, none of the detected concentrations exceeded the MDEQ Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs). Of the metals detected in soil, only arsenic exceeded the MDEQ uTRG. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, iron, lead, and manganese were detected in groundwater during the site investigation at concentrations exceeding their respective TRGs.

During the expanded site investigation, completed in 2007, additional soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater samples were collected. Arsenic was detected in surface soil at concentrations exceeding the uTRG. Benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene,benzo(b)fluoranthene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and arsenic were detected above their respective uTRG values in subsurface soil. In sediment, only arsenic and iron were detected at concentrations greater than their respective TRGs. In surface water, only iron and thallium were detected exceeding their respective TRGs. There were no detections above TRGs in groundwater.

A second expanded site investigation, completed in 2009, included an assessment of the landfill cover thickness, vertical hydraulic conductivity, and sediment, surface water, and groundwater sampling. The 2009 expanded site investigation recommended preparing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis to identify and analyze remedial alternatives for Site 3A.

The remedy selected for Site 3A during the engineering evaluation/cost analysis consists of landfill cover stabilization measures, land use controls (LUCs) to manage the property in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover, and long-term monitoring (LTM) of groundwater.

Ongoing actions include LTM of groundwater to verify that waste containment is effective and LUCs. LUC inspections and LTM began in September 2012.

 

SITE 3B - Metal Landfill

Site 3B, the Metal Landfill, was approximately 100 feet wide, 140 feet long, and 20 feet deep. The Metal Landfill was in operation from approximately the mid-1960s until 1985. This landfill was designated as a metals-only landfill and was primarily used to dispose of scrap materials generated by personnel from the aircraft hangar located northeast of the site. The materials were pushed into the 30-foot-deep ravine, and the disposal areas were then backfilled with sandy fill and concrete.

In addition to scrap metal, wastes reportedly disposed within the Metal Landfill included automobile chassis, gasoline tanks, paint cans, and unlabeled 5-gallon cans. Site 3B is wooded and not currently in use.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified dieldrin, arsenic, and iron in soil at concentrations exceeding MDEQ Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs). In groundwater, trichloroethene, aluminum, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese, and mercury exceeded the MDEQ TRG.

During the expanded site investigation, completed in 2006, additional soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater samples were collected. Only arsenic and iron were detected in surface and subsurface soil at concentrations exceeding the uTRG. There were no exceedances of TRGs in groundwater. In sediment, only arsenic was detected above the uTRG. In surface water, only thallium was detected above the TRG.

A second expanded site investigation, completed in 2009, reviewed the results of previous site investigations and recommended preparing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis to identify and analyze remedial alternatives for Site 3B.

In 2010, additional data collection activities were performed, including a geophysical survey, landfill gas assessment, test pit/trenching, and soil, sediment, and groundwater sampling.

The engineering evaluation/cost analysis determined that a removal action was necessary to protect human health and the environment. In 2012, surficial and buried waste were removed from the site for offsite disposal, the area was graded, and the site was restored.

The removal action eliminated the risk of exposure to surficial and buried landfill wastes and potential for unacceptable risk to human health and the environment. The Action Memorandum for Site 3B was signed in May 2011.

 

SITES 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D - Sludge Disposal Areas 1, 2, 3, and 4

Sites 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D were used as disposal areas for dried sludge generated from a wastewater treatment facility that operated at NAS Meridian from 1961 until 1990. The wastewater treatment facility was located at the edge of the golf course on the eastern side of the administration area. The facility had a rated capacity of 0.8 million gallons per day and handled domestic wastewater from all but a few outlying buildings at the base. In addition to household sewage, several other wastes may have been treated by the wastewater treatment facility, including wastes from paint stripping activities and wastes from an aircraft maintenance paint booth water curtain. The quality of treated effluent from the facility was generally good and routinely in compliance with its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. NAS Meridian transitioned to municipal wastewater treatment beginning in 1990. Sites 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D are not currently in use and only Site 4C is regularly maintained through mowing.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified the following constituents above the MDEQ Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs) for soil:

Site 4A - Benzo(a)pyrene; arsenic

Site 4B – Arsenic

Site 4C - Arsenic

Site 4D - Benzo(a)pyrene; arsenic

Based on the site investigation results, additional analysis of soil, analysis of groundwater to determine whether groundwater had been impacted by contaminants found in soil, and analysis of surface water and sediment, was recommended.

In 2009, an expanded site investigation, consisting of additional sampling activities, concluded that the impact to soil and groundwater from the surface disposal of wastewater treatment sludge shows no unacceptable risk to human health and the environment at Sites 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D. An Site Assessment Completed (SAC) status was recommended for each of the sites.

The results of soil and groundwater investigations, conducted in several phases, indicated there are no concentrations of contaminants of concern (COCs) above their respective uTRGs with the exception of arsenic and iron in soil. Concentrations of arsenic and iron above their respective uTRGs are likely attributable to background concentrations in soil. Because no remedial action was necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, No Further Action (NFA) was recommended for Sites 4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D and a DD was prepared and signed on December 2, 2010.

 

SITE 5 – Former Pesticide Mixing Area

Site 5, the Former Pesticide Mixing Area, is approximately 150 feet east of the Public Works Building (Building 229) and encompasses an area of approximately 100 square feet.

The Former Pesticide Mixing Area was in use from 1961 until 1985. During this time, the area consisted of a storage building and a mixing area. Site activities included mixing and blending pesticides. Spills reportedly occurred in this area during the mixing process. Site 5 is in a developed area, among several buildings and sheds. Site 5 is currently in use as a general equipment storage area for base maintenance.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified three pesticides, 4,4’-DDE, 4,4’-DDT, and dieldrin, above MDEQ Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs) in soil. Of the metals detected in soil, only arsenic exceeded its uTRG. No contaminants of concern were detected in groundwater.

An interim removal action was conducted in 1996 to remove and dispose of impacted soil. A review of the confirmation soil sampling results concluded that the sampling program used during the interim removal action did not conform to MDEQ guidelines in place at the time. Additional confirmatory soil sampling was conducted in 2002; no organic constituents were found in soil or groundwater at concentrations greater than uTRGs. Of the metals detected, only arsenic exceeded the uTRG in soil and only manganese exceeded the TRG in groundwater.

Because of residual soil and groundwater contaminant concentrations above TRG values, long-term monitoring (LTM) was recommended for Site 5. Ongoing actions include LTM of groundwater. LTM began in January 2006.

 

SITE 6 – Former Firefighting Training Area

Site 6, the Former Firefighting Training Area, was in use from approximately 1969 (when the previous firefighting training area, Site 1, was closed) until 1987. The site contained three concrete lined circular burn pits, drainage pipes, an oil/water separator (OWS), a waste oil underground storage tank (UST), drums, and debris. In addition, fuel stains were visible on the soil around each of the circular burn pits. Approximately 400 gallons of JP-5, JP-4, aviation gasoline, and some fuel contaminated water were burned in the circular pits during each of approximately four monthly training exercises. Waste oil containing solvents, generated during aircraft and vehicle maintenance operations, was also occasionally burned during training exercises. The small burn pit was reportedly also once used for temporary storage (less than 90 days) of hazardous waste. Site 6 is located in a cleared, generally flat and grassy area near the south runway. Site 6 is currently used for mobile contractor offices and as laydown site for contractor equipment.

The site investigation, completed in 1992, identified dieldrin, arsenic, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil at concentrations exceeding the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs). In groundwater, dieldrin, aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, iron, and manganese were detected at concentrations exceeding MDEQ Target Remediation Goals (TRGs).

An interim removal action, completed in 1996, included excavating impacted soil for off-site disposal and collecting confirmation soil samples to verify the soil removal had been successful. A review of the confirmation soil sampling results concluded that the sampling program used during the interim removal action did not conform to MDEQ guidelines in place at the time. Additional confirmatory soil sampling was conducted in 2002; dieldrin, TPH, arsenic, iron, and mercury were detected in soil at concentrations exceeding uTRGs. In groundwater, aluminum, barium, beryllium, iron, lead, and manganese were detected at concentrations exceeding TRGs.

Because of residual soil and groundwater contaminant concentrations above TRG values, long-term monitoring (LTM) was recommended for Site 6. Ongoing actions include LTM of groundwater. LTM began in January 2006.

 

SITE 7 - Turnkey Generator Lift Station

Site 7 is a former lift station that was used to collect and transfer sewage from the base housing units to an onsite wastewater treatment plant until 1990. The onsite wastewater treatment plant was in operation from 1961 until 1990. After 1990, the lift station transferred waste to an offsite municipal wastewater treatment plant. The lift station was decommissioned in 2008 when the housing units associated with the lift station were demolished.

The former lift station consisted of transfer pumps, a backup generator, two sumps, and one diesel fuel aboveground storage tank (AST). The AST had a capacity of 500 gallons and was used to power the backup generator.

In February 2007, diesel leaked from the backup generator. Because Site 7 is located adjacent to the NAS Meridian perimeter fence, some of the diesel fuel migrated offsite, onto property not owned by the federal government. The former residential area surrounding Site 7 is mainly flat and currently consists of a large grass field with small trees scattered throughout the area. Site 7 is not currently in use and the site is not maintained by NAS Meridian public works personnel.

An initial soil removal action was conducted in 2007 and approximately 168 tons of petroleum contaminated soils were removed for offsite disposal. Confirmatory soil sampling was conducted and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations in remaining soil exceeded the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Unrestricted Target Remediation Goals (uTRGs).

An engineering evaluation/cost analysis for a non-time critical removal action was performed in 2011. The engineering evaluation/cost analysis selected an additional soil removal action as the site remedy.

Removal of diesel-impacted soil mitigated unacceptable risk to human health and the environment. The Action Memorandum for Site 7 was signed in November 2011.

 

SITE 8 - Former Wash Rack

Site 8, the Former Wash Rack, located within an industrial area of NAS Meridian and adjacent to the flight line, was used to clean various trainer aircraft between 1963 and 2006. There is no documentation of the specific solvents and products used during operation of the wash rack, but known historical chemicals include trichloroethene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), Trico Air Craft Soap, fuels (JP-4, JP-5, and JP-8), hydraulic fluid, AC Engine Oil, lacquer thinner, naphtha, Aldine chemical conversion coating, and graphite grease. The former oil/water separator (OWS) collected rinse water from the wash rack and stormwater runoff. A manual valve was used to direct rinse water from jet cleaning to the industrial sewer line and runoff from precipitation to the stormwater drainage line when the wash rack was not in use. The stormwater drainage line runs south of the site and then discharges into an unlined drainage ditch. The OWS was excavated and removed in December 2014.

In 2010, subsurface soil samples were collected from the site and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The results indicated there had been a release of contaminants to the environment at Site 8 and a remedial investigation was warranted to assess potential risks.

Between 2012 and 2014, a remedial investigation was conducted. During this investigation, VOCs, SVOCs, and metals were detected above conservative screening criterion in soil and groundwater. A human health risk assessment (HHRA) was conducted to evaluate potential human health risks associated with exposure to soil and groundwater. The results of the HHRA did not identify any contaminants of concern (COCs) for soil. However, several VOCs and SVOCs were identified as COCs for groundwater, including: 1,1,2-TCA; 1,1-DCA; 1,1-DCE; cis-1,2,-DCE; 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene; 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene; 1,4-DCB; benzene; chloroform; ethylbenzene; methylene chloride; TCE; VC; 1,1-biphenyl; 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene; benzo(a)anthracene; and naphthalene.

In December 2014, a subgrade biogeochemical reactor (SBGR) was constructed at Site 8 to assess whether this technology could effectively accelerate the removal of chlorinated VOCs from source area soil and groundwater. Performance groundwater monitoring has been conducted and results indicate the SBGR is performing as planned.

The remedial investigation recommended a feasibility study to address potential unacceptable risk to human receptors from exposure to site-related contaminants in soil and groundwater. Currently, the feasibility study recommendations are being reviewed by the Navy and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ).

 

SITE 9 - Bulk Fuel Storage Area

Site 9, the Bulk Fuel Storage Area, is the location where fuel was delivered from 1961 until 1978 by rail car tankers along a former spur that entered the site from the south. During this time, fuel was unloaded from the rail car tankers using belowground transfer piping located along the spur near the western edge of the site and transferred to three aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). In 1979, the railroad spurs were removed and fuel began being delivered using tanker trucks and an underground pipeline. In 1993, during replacement of a waterline transecting the site, contaminated soil and liquid-phase petroleum products were discovered. The waterline replacement was temporarily halted due to safety concerns related to the presence of liquid-phase petroleum products and contaminated soil. Only contaminated soil near the waterline was excavated and disposed offsite. In 2011, during a routine Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan inspection, damage to a well associated with Site 9 was noted. Upon further inspection by NAS Meridian Environmental personnel, the well was observed to contain absorbent material that contained liquid-phase petroleum products. Additionally, a strong petroleum odor was noted emanating from the well. Site 9 currently receives fuel via tanker trucks and an underground pipeline which is then stored in three 1-million-gallon ASTs located onsite.

In 2010, subsurface soil samples were collected from the site and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and results showed low-level detections, including fuel constituents and chlorinated solvents. Additional soil and groundwater investigation was deemed necessary to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site.

In 2012 and 2013, a remedial investigation was conducted. During this investigation, semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected in soil above conservative screening criterion. In groundwater, VOCs and metals were detected above conservative screening criterion. A human health risk assessment (HHRA) was conducted to evaluate potential human health risks associated with exposure to soil and groundwater. The results of the HHRA did not identify any contaminants of concern (COCs) for soil. However, several VOCs and SVOCs were identified as COCs for groundwater, including: benzene, ethylbenzene, TCE, benzo(a)anthracene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1-biphenyl.

In 2016, a pilot study began, whereby subsurface soils containing free-phase petroleum were excavated using Hydrovac and the excavations were backfilled with a long-term oxygen release compound (ORC) to stimulate biodegradation of dissolved-phase petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. Currently, performance monitoring groundwater activities associated with the pilot study are being performed. The pilot study is expected to continue through 2020.

 

SITE 10 - Lake Opal Landfill

Site 10, the Lake Opal Landfill, is composed of a former landfill (approximately 3 acres) located north of Fuller Road and to the northwest of man-made Lake Opal. Site 10 was reportedly used for disposal of NAS Meridian-generated construction debris, scrap metal, Base refuse, and other unknown materials from 1980 until 1990. The specific contents of the landfill are not documented, but NAS Meridian Environmental personnel report that metallic and non-metallic construction debris were dumped and buried. Construction debris was reportedly pushed or dumped into the ravine with portions of the debris covered at various times with onsite soil. After disposal activities ceased in 1990, a cover using available onsite soil was placed over a portion of the debris. No known chemical spills or releases occurred during disposal activities at Site 10. Currently, Site 10 is located within an area of open field covered by 3- to 5-year-old pine trees, grass, and weeds.

In 2013 and 2014, a remedial investigation was conducted at Site 10. This investigation included digital geophysical mapping and ground-penetrating radar surveying to delineate the footprint of the suspected landfill and evaluate the depth to buried waste; trenching to delineate the extents of the landfill and characterize the contents; and groundwater, soil, surface water, and sediment sampling. The results of the remedial investigation found very few organic compounds, and those that were detected were below conservative screening criterion. Metals concentrations were attributed to background concentrations. Although the presence of the waste does not appear to have created a significant chemical release to adjacent environmental media, the presence of buried and exposed waste contributes to a safety risk to trespassers and Base maintenance personnel.

An engineering evaluation/cost analysis was completed in 2017 to evaluate the removal alternatives to address the potential risks posed by buried waste left in place at Site 10. Removal of buried and surficial waste was selected as the preferred alternative.

Currently, planning for the removal of buried and surficial waste is ongoing, with the removal action expected to be completed in 2019.

 

Small Arms Range (SAR) West

Small Arms Range (SAR) West was identified as a site during the Munitions Response Program (MRP) Preliminary Assessment (PA) conducted in 2013. Construction planning for SAR West began in 1963, and by 1968 the range was receiving heavy use from hunters and shooters in training. The range was used for both recreational shooting and organized competition until it was closed in 1978. Though the exact number and types of ammunition used at SAR West is unknown, SAR ammunition is a potential source of munitions constituents (MC). Possible MC include antimony, arsenic, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc, with lead being the primary risk driver. The area is currently covered in vegetation and the berm is partially intact, with soil mounds scattered throughout the area.

A site investigation was conducted in 2015 and 2016 and included digital geophysical mapping, berm trenching activities, and soil and groundwater sampling. Results of the field activities at SAR West indicate antimony, copper, and lead concentrations in berm soil and lead concentrations in surface soil exceeded background and at least one screening criterion. In addition, field activities showed the berm soil contains approximately 4.1 percent bullets and bullet fragments, based on the metals concentrations in the three trenches.

Therefore, the presence of bullets and bullets fragments at SAR West poses a source of metals that could contaminate environmental media in the future. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis and a removal action at SAR West was recommended to alleviate the long-term environmental liability. Currently, planning for an interim source removal, for SAR West berm soils, is ongoing. The removal action is expected to be completed by early-2019.

 

Naval Outlying Landing Field (NOLF) Joe Williams

Naval Outlying Landing Field (NOLF) Joe Williams is an outlying landing field supporting NAS Meridian, located in east-central Mississippi, approximately 19 miles northwest of NAS Meridian. Formerly known as outlying field "Bravo," it was renamed in 1987 after Captain Joe W. Williams, Jr., NAS Meridian's second commanding officer and the recipient of the Navy Cross. NOLF Joe Williams is currently operated by NAS Meridian’s Air Operations Department with a primary mission to support Training Air Wing One undergraduate pilot training. The facility consists of one 8,000-foot runway that provides increased capacity and capabilities for Student Naval Aviator Training and several buildings located in the Main Operations Area south of the runway. Training conducted at NOLF Joe Williams includes touch-and-go operations, low approaches, and field carrier landing practice. No aircraft are currently stationed at NOLF Joe Williams. Personnel stationed at NOLF Joe Williams consist of fire-fighting, flight operations, and emergency response personnel. Environmental assessments at NOLF Joe Williams are currently ongoing.

Click here for a PDF of the Site Map

 

 

 

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