Environmental

Currently Active OU Status/Sites

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Overview

Currently at NAS Jacksonville there are 12 active Operable Units (OUs) with investigation or remedial efforts ongoing. The active OUs include OU 1, OU 2, OU 3, OU 4, OU 5, OU 6, OU 7, OU 8, OU 9, OU 10 (MRP Sites discussed under Munitions Response Sites tab), OU 11, and OU 12; additionally, there are potential source of contamination (PSC) sites (PSCs 56, 57, and 58) under investigation that have not been designated as OUs. A description of the activities at each of the active OUs and PSC sites is provided below.

Environmental Restoration, Navy (ER,N) Sites

OU 1 – Oil and Solvent Disposal Pits Area

OU 1 is comprised of Potential Source of Contamination (PSC) 26 (Old Main Registered Disposal Area) and PSC 27 (Former Transformer Storage Area). PSC 26 was used for various disposal purposes between 1940 and 1979. PSC 27, which is south of and adjoins PSC 26, was used to store transformers with dielectric fluid that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PSC 26 and PSC 27 comprise OU 1 because of their proximate locations. The Record of Decision (ROD) for OU 1 was signed in September 1997. The Land Use Control Remedial Design was approved/finalized 19 January 2012. Additional site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D document issued in November 2004.

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 26, SITE 00026 Old Main Registered Disposal Area (OU 1)(OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1029) Waste oils, spent solvents, and paint wastes ROD (1997)
PSC 26 is approximately 30 to 40 acres in two contiguous parcels (north Parcel 1 and south Parcel 2) separated by Child Street. The former landfill portion of PSC 26 is approximately 17 acres and is fenced with warning signs to prevent unauthorized access, and land use controls (LUCs) to prevent unauthorized disturbance of the cap. Unnamed drainage ditches within a portion of the wooded area south of the main landfill drain south through additional woods into an unnamed tributary of the St. Johns River estuary and adjoining wetlands south of OU 1. The Record of Decision (ROD) for OU 1 was signed in September 1997. The Land Use Control Remedial Design was approved/finalized 19 January 2012. Ongoing activities at the site include annual long-term groundwater monitoring and landfill inspection and maintenance.
PSC 27, SITE 00027 Former Transformer Storage Area (OU 1) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1030) Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated dielectric fluid ROD (1997)
PSC 27 is south of PSC 26 Parcel 2 and is less than 1 acre in size and was used to store transformers for an unknown period of time before 1978. Vandalism reportedly caused spill(s) of unknown quantities of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-containing transformer oil to the ground surface. The Navy subsequently removed the transformers and PCB-contaminated soil for off-site disposal. The ROD for OU 1 was signed in September 1997. The Land Use Control Remedial Design was approved/finalized 19 January 2012. Ongoing activities at the site include annual long-term groundwater monitoring and landfill inspection and maintenance. Long-term groundwater monitoring at PSC 27 is due to contaminants in the adjacent PSC 26.

 

OU 2 – Wastewater Treatment Area

OU 2 is located in the northern portion of NAS Jacksonville. OU 2 contains NAS Jacksonville’s waste water treatment plant (WWTP), which treated industrial and domestic wastes c. 1970 to the mid-1980s. OU 2 includes five Potential Sources of Contamination (PSCs), PSC 3, PSC 4, PSC 41, PSC 42, and PSC 43. Buildings remain at OU 2; however, the majority of the area consists of grassland with scattered trees and more densely wooded areas. Source areas were treated and removed at OU 2 allowing for No Further Action (NFA) required with implementation of Land Use Controls (LUCs) restricting land use (to prevent exposure to soil) and groundwater use. PSCs 41, 42, and 43 were classified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units that required post-closure monitoring of groundwater until standards were achieved. The OU 2 Record of Decision (ROD) was completed in October 1998. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D document issued in November 2004.

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 3, SITE 00003 PSC 3-WWTP former Sludge Disposal Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1011) Domestic and Industrial sludge containing metals and organic compounds ROD (1998) NFA required except implementation of LUCs restricting groundwater use and land use.
PSC 3 is comprised of two contiguous parcels (north Parcel 1 and South Parcel 2) divided by an access road, totaling approximately 15 acres east of PSCs 41 and 43, and northeast of PSC 4. Approximately 20,000 tons of domestic and industrial sludge containing metals and organic compounds were disposed of (dumped in piles or spread on the ground) between 1962 and 1980; only the area south of the access road (Parcel 2) was used for sludge disposal. Excavation at one sample location was conducted in January 1997 and incorporated into an IRA at PSC 42.
PSC 4, SITE 00004 Pine Tree Planting Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1013) Paint shavings, sewage sludge, oil, asbestos, and petroleum products. ROD (1998) NFA required except implementation of LUCs restricting groundwater use and land use.
PSC 4 is approximately 70 acres southwest of the WWTP, bound by Patrol Road to the north and west and John Towers Field access roads to the east. This southernmost PSC within OU 2 was named because approximately 5 to 6 acres in the north part of the area were planted with pine trees after 1975. PSC 4 was used for disposal (dumped in piles or spread on the ground) of paint shavings, sewage sludge, oil, asbestos, and petroleum products from 1968 to 1975. Sludge piles were removed in January 1997 along with soil surrounding one sample location in the same area. The excavated material were incorporated into an IRA at PSC 42 in 1998.
PSC 41, SITE 00041, SWMU 00002 Domestic Waste Sludge Drying Beds (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_993) Domestic and Industrial sludge containing metals and organic compounds Transferred to RCRA (1999)
NFA (2007)
PSC 41 is an approximately one-third-acre rectangular area west of and south of PSC 43. Five unlined domestic waste sludge drying beds (DSDBs) were constructed in 1970 to dry sludge from the domestic WWTP anaerobic digester. Sludge was dried, removed from the DSDBs, and disposed of at PSC 3, PSC 4, or a landfill. PSC 41 was investigated during the Focused RI. High concentrations of metals exceeding industrial or general worker risk-based screening levels were detected in samples of sludge bed filter media and underlying soil. In order to reduce potential risks associated with metals contamination and to comply with RCRA closure requirements, interim remedial actions (IRAs) were performed concurrently at PSCs 41 and 43; approximately 3,000 cubic yards of material were excavated and treated, then used as backfill at PSC 42. The OU 2 ROD was completed in October 1998. Between 2004 and 2007, groundwater concentrations remained below FDEP GCTLs and the Navy submitted a request to end post-closure monitoring for PSC 41 on 9 January 2007. FDEP approved the request on 5 February 2007. The Navy has terminated all post-closure monitoring and LUC inspections for PSC 41 based on 2007 FDEP approval.
PSC 42, SITE 00042, SWMU 00002 Effluent Polishing Pond (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_994) F006 and F019 Hazardous Waste Transferred to RCRA (1999)

PSC 42 is an approximately 4.5-acre serpentine- or “S-” shaped polishing pond approximately 300 feet east of Patrol Road and 600 feet north of PSC 3. The Effluent Polishing Pond was built in 1970 to provide final clarification for approximately 2.3 million gallons per day of treated wastewater from both domestic and industrial WWTPs prior to chlorination and discharge to the St. Johns River. In 1983, the USEPA classified the polishing pond as a surface impoundment used to treat RCRA-listed hazardous wastes F006 and F019. Source areas were treated and removed at OU 2 allowing for NFA required with implementation of LUCs restricting land use (to prevent exposure to soil) and groundwater use. In October 1998, sludge drying beds were excavated and placed at this site.

The OU 2 ROD was completed in October 1998. This site was transferred to the RCRA program.

PSC 43, SITE 00043, SWMU 00002 Industrial Waste Sludge Drying Beds (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_995) F001, F006, and F019 Hazardous Waste Transferred to RCRA (1999)
PSC 43 is an approximately 1,000-square-foot area north of PSC 41 and east of PSC 3. Four Industrial Sludge Drying Beds (ISDBs) were constructed in 1980 to dewater (dry) industrial wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating and parts cleaning operations (RCRA Hazardous Waste Codes F001 to F006 and F019). PSC 43 was investigated during the Focused RI. High concentrations of metals exceeding industrial or general worker risk-based screening levels were detected in samples of sludge bed filter media and underlying soil. In order to reduce potential risks associated with metals contamination and to comply with RCRA closure requirements, interim remedial actions (IRAs) were performed concurrently at PSCs 41 and 43; approximately 3,000 cubic yards of material were excavated and treated, then used as backfill at PSC 42. The OU 2 ROD was completed in October 1998. This site was transferred to the RCRA program. Activities at the site include a groundwater monitoring program. Between 2004 and 2007, groundwater concentrations remained below FDEP GCTLs and the Navy submitted a request to end post-closure monitoring for PSC 43 on 9 January 2007. FDEP approved the request on 5 February 2007. The Navy has terminated all post-closure monitoring and LUC inspections for PSC 43 based on 2007 FDEP approval.

 

OU 3 – Industrial Area and Dry Cleaners

OU 3 is within the 134-acre Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), which is a major industrial complex with a primary mission to perform in-depth repair and modification of aircraft, engines, and aeronautical components. OU 3 is located on the east edge of NAS Jacksonville, south runway 10-28. Most of OU 3 is developed with buildings or is paved (greater than 1 foot thick). Sites included within OU 3 as Potential Sources of Contamination (PSCs) 11 through 16, PSC 48, Building 780, and Areas A through H. These sites have historically been investigated as separate sites. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation (RI) Addendum and a Feasibility Study (FS) Addendum, with a Record of Decision (ROD) amendment to follow. (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3513) More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 11, SITE 00011 Building 101 (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1021) Waste solvents, chromium and nickel waste, mercury spill, hazardous material storage ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 11 encompasses Building 101 in the north-central portion of OU 3; overlaps Areas A, D, and E; and abuts the Building 780 plume and PSC 12. At PSC 11, tin, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel, silver, chromium, and gold electroplating operations were conducted in the former plating shop in Building 101 between the 1940s and 1990. This facility included a wastewater treatment system outside the building. Impacts identified at Building 101 are associated with hazardous materials storage, unauthorized disposal of 2,000 gallons of waste solvents and other materials beneath steel plates in the floor in the Jetline Hangar area, plating shop operations and its associated cyanide and chromium waste treatment facility, an anodizing process in the northern portion of the building that generated chromium and nickel waste products, and 150 pounds of mercury spilled in the northeast portion of Building 101. PSC 11 is identified as the source for Area C. A removal action was conducted between 1992 and 1995 at the former plating shop in the southeast corner of Building 101. As part of the removal action, the storage, dip, and wash tanks, all associated piping, overlying concrete floor, and underlying soil were removed. Following tank and pipe removal, the plating shop building was demolished and removed. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring was implemented. The ROD-preferred remedial action at PSC 11 was No Further Action based on information specific risk evaluations. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 12, SITE 00012 Old Test Cell Building (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_979) Waste oil, fuel, and solvents ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 12 encompasses Building 101K, outside, near the center of the east exterior wall of Building 101 in the north-central portion of OU 3. PSC 12, the Old Test Cell Building, was identified as a PSC because 55-gallon drums of chemicals such as waste oil, fuel, and solvents were once stored there. Numerous spills of toxic and reactive chemicals from rusted and ruptured drums reportedly occurred, as did the potential discharge of solvents and other wastes discharged via ruptures and breaks in sanitary and industrial storm sewers at the building. The ROD-mandated remedial action at PSC 12 was No Further Action based on information specific risk evaluations. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 13, SITE 00013 Radium Paint Disposal Pit (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1012) Radium paint waste ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 13 encompasses Building 444 and the south end of Building 840 in central OU 3, and abuts Buildings 158 and 158A and overlaps Areas A and B. PSC 13 is a 50-foot by 40-foot by 1-foot pit that was identified as a PSC because it was used to dispose of radioactive radium paint waste in the 1940s and 1950s. The pit, formerly located between Buildings 480 and 167 in the central part of the FRCSE, was excavated in the late 1950s and the soil was moved to PSC 18, the Fill Disposal Area.. Building 444 is now at this location. During the 1950s, radium paint waste, discarded luminous dials, and associated contaminated soil and asphalt were removed from the former disposal pit at PSC 13. Following a RAD survey of the area in 1995, additional contaminated soil and a few painted dials were found and removed from the area surrounding the former disposal pit. The contaminated soil and dials were placed beneath the landfill cap at OU 1. The ROD-preferred remedial action at PSC 13 was No Further Action based on information specific risk evaluations. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 14, SITE 00014 Battery Shop Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_976) Lead battery acid ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 14 is a small area outside, near the center of the west exterior wall of Building 125 in the south-central portion of OU 3. It does not overlap groundwater contamination areas. PSC 14, the former Battery Shop (west of Building 125), included a seepage pit used to dispose of approximately 100 gallons per year of lead battery acid between 1959 and 1982. The ROD-mandated remedial action at PSC 14 was No Further Action (assuming Land Use Controls limit future activities to industrial uses) based on information specific risk evaluations. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 15, SITE 00015 Solvent and Paint Sludge Disposal Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_975) Paint waste and solvents, radium-226 ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 15 encompasses the south end of Building 791 in the south end of OU 3. It abuts Building 759 and to the west adjoins Building 795; it is north of the Hush House and west of the Kemen Test Cell Petroleum Contaminated Areas (PCAs); and overlaps Area G. PSC 15 is a 10,000-square-foot area south of the paint shop (Building 868) near the south end of the FRCSE that received up to 2,000 gallons of waste solvents and paint annually between 1968 and 1978. In 1997 a radiological characterization survey in the PSC 15 area identified radium-226-contaminated soil. In 1998 contaminated soil was removed and placed beneath the landfill cap at OU 1, and the excavation was backfilled with clean soil. The Navy is currently implementing a groundwater cleanup at the site and will further address the site in the OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 16, SITE 00016 PSC 16 – Black Point Storm Sewer Discharge (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_978) JP-5 fuel, hydraulic oil, chrome, and cyanide ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 16 is located at the southern edge of OU 3 south of Building 777. It abuts Area G to the north and St. Johns River to the south. PSC 16 was identified as a PSC based on recurring discharges of JP-5 fuel and hydraulic oil that reportedly entered the storm sewer from fuel tank overflow in the vicinity of an engine test cell, located along the east side of Building 101. Additional reported spills of chromium, cyanide, and other chemicals entered the storm sewer, which discharged at PSC 16. The Navy conducted a cleanup of sediment in the area of PSC 16. Further sampling was conducted and compared to background values for the Ortega River area and the site is approved for No Further Remedial Action. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
PSC 48, SITE 00048 Old Dry Cleaners (Building 106) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1034) Drycleaning solvent ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
PSC 48 is an L-shaped area in the northwest portion of OU 3, east of the former Building 106, west of Building 103, and north of Building 105. It overlaps Area D. PSC 48, the air station drycleaners, operated in Building 106 from 1962 into the 1990s. Site assessment activities performed to delineate the extent of soil and groundwater contamination resulted in selection of air sparging (AS) with soil-vapor extraction (SVE) and carbon adsorption as the interim remedial action at PSC 48. Construction of this system was completed in 1998. A 2004-2005 Optimization Study concluded that the treatment system was ineffective as a final remedy and the AS/SVE system was shut down on 28 January 2005. The Navy is currently conducting an alternative groundwater cleanup action and is also preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow. In addition, several ESTCP (a Department of Defense [DoD] environmental technology demonstration and validation program) projects have been conducted at PSC 48. These include a Source Attenuation History Study in 2011, an assessment of Natural Attenuation of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) Source Zones in 2012, an Evaluation of Vapor Intrusion in 2012, and an ElectroKinetic Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test in 2015.
OU 00003 Building 780 and Building 780C Paint waste and solvents, jet fuel ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Buildings 780 and 780C are located in the north-central portion of OU 3, along the south side of Albermarle Avenue. The site encompasses Buildings 101G, 780, and 1952. It abuts the west wall of Building 101N and north wall of Building 101. From 1970 to the mid-1980s Building 780 was used to paint and chemically strip aircraft and associated parts. Jet fuel tanks were frequently flushed and stripped outside the northwest corner of the building. The organic solvents used for stripping included 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, methylene chloride, butyl acetate, and naphthalene. Spent paints and solvents were also emptied into floor drains and an industrial sewer system. The interim remedial action for Building 780 was groundwater extraction and treatment (GWT) with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and catalytic oxidation. Construction of this system was completed in 1998. The ROD implemented the interim remedial action GWT/SVE as the final remedial action because the system was effectively removing contaminants from groundwater and the vadose zone, thereby reducing the toxicity and volume while providing protection to human health and the environment. The 2004-2005 Optimization Study concluded the treatment system was ineffective as a final remedy and the GWT/SVE system was shut down on 28 January 2005. The Navy is currently planning a groundwater cleanup activity and will also include this site in an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Storm Sewer Trichloroethene ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Located throughout OU 3, contaminated groundwater infiltrates storm sewers that discharge into the St. Johns River south of OU 3. Initial investigations included a primary north-to-south trending storm sewer that received discharges of contaminated groundwater from Areas A, E, F, and G. Impacts to a second, tidally influenced storm sewer were identified in 2007. The secondary storm sewer trends north to south along the east side of OU 3, and discharges through a submerged outfall beneath sediment of the St. Johns River in an area adjacent to the south side of OU 3. Assessment data indicated that water in the storm sewer exceeds surface water screening criteria during low tide periods but is diluted by mixing with surface water within the storm sewer at high tide. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Storm Sewer Trichloroethene ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Located throughout OU 3, contaminated groundwater infiltrates storm sewers that discharge into the St. Johns River south of OU 3. Initial investigations included a primary north-to-south trending storm sewer that received discharges of contaminated groundwater from Areas A, E, F, and G. Impacts to a second, tidally influenced storm sewer were identified in 2007. The secondary storm sewer trends north to south along the east side of OU 3, and discharges through a submerged outfall beneath sediment of the St. Johns River in an area adjacent to the south side of OU 3. Assessment data indicated that water in the storm sewer exceeds surface water screening criteria during low tide periods but is diluted by mixing with surface water within the storm sewer at high tide. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.

 

Isolated Groundwater Contamination Areas
Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
OU 00003 Area A (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3506) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2006)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)

Area A located in the central portion of OU 3, underlies Buildings 444, 101X, 158, 158A, 101Y, 101, and 101C, and overlaps Area B and PSC 13. Area A is a plume located on the east side of Building 101, and is divided by Wright Street. The shallow (2 to 20 feet below ground surface) zone of the surficial groundwater at Area A is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including benzene, 1,2-dichloroethene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, and vinyl chloride. The plume initially had a maximum total VOC concentration of 37,141 micrograms per liter at a depth of 15 feet below ground surface. The constituents remain at concentrations that exceed Florida Department of Environmental Protection Groundwater Cleanup Target Levels. The source of contamination at Area A is uncertain but is believed to have originated from a former engine cleaning area near or within Building 101. The land at Area A is flat and consists of buildings, paved storage areas, and a paved road. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.

Continued monitoring of Area A is ongoing.

OU 00003 Area B (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3507) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area B located in the central portion of OU 3, underlies Building 840 and overlaps Area A and PSC 13. Area B is a plume beneath the southwest corner of Building 840.  Elevated volatile organic compounds above exceed Florida Department of Environmental Protection Groundwater Cleanup Target Levels were identified in the intermediate zone (38 feet below ground surface) in the surficial aquifer. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Area C (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3508) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area C is located in the northeast portion of OU 3, east of Buildings 189/190. Area C underlies Building 1122, 1202, and former Building 1203. Area C is a plume located between former Hangars 122 and 123, estimated to be approximately 300 feet long by 150 feet wide in the intermediate zone of the surficial aquifer, with a maximum total volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration of 2,800 micrograms per liter (µg/L) in 1993. In 1997, 5,000 µg/L of trichloroethene was detected in a downgradient well near the seawall. Groundwater contamination is typically found beneath the clay layer in the intermediate aquifer from 30 to 60 feet in depth, but has been detected in the shallow aquifer (at 10 feet in depth) as well. A cleanup action was conducted at Area C and was determined to be effective. A groundwater investigation was conducted from a barge in the St. Johns River east of Area C in January of 2008. It was determined that dredging for the construction of the pier at the northeast side of OU 3 had breached the clay layer in the river. The dredged area had since been filled in by organic rich sediments, which appear to be conducive to bioremediation as VOCs were not detected in them.
The site will be included in the OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibiltiy Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Area D (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3509) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area D is a plume located in the northwest portion of OU 3. Area D represents the largest area of contamination at OU 3, extending beneath portions of Buildings 103, 101S, and the north end of Building 101. Area D overlaps portions of PSC 48, Building 780, and PSC 11 plumes. Groundwater contamination is typically found beneath the clay layer in the intermediate aquifer from 24 to 60 feet in depth, but has been detected in the shallow aquifer (at 8 feet in depth) as well. The Area D plume is estimated to be approximately 500 feet long by 150 feet wide, with total volatile organic compound concentrations greater than 2,000 micrograms per liter in the intermediate zone of the surficial aquifer. A cleanup action was conducted at Area D and was determined to be effective. The site will be included in the OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibiltiy Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Area E (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3510) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area E is located in the west-central portion of OU 3, west of PSC 14. Area E underlies the south end of Building 101W north of Enterprise Avenue, and the west ends of Buildings 277, 1957, and 1950A, and overlaps PSC 11 plume. It partially extends south of the OU 3 boudary. Groundwater contamination is typically found in the shallow aquifer (at 6 to 18 feet in depth). The surficial aquifer plume has a maximum total volatile organic compound concentration of 17,000 micrograms per liter. The plume appears to have originated from a single discharge or spill event with preferential transport from an unidentified upgradient source. The groundwater at Area E appears to flow directly toward the storm sewer beneath Enterprise Avenue, which discharges into the St. Johns River. The Navy is currently preparing an OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow.
OU 00003 Area F (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3511) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area F located in the south end of OU 3, underlies Buildings 796, 792, 800, 177, 868, and 795, and partially extends west of OU 3 beneath Building 799. Area F is north of Area G and PSC 15. The Area F plume is on the east side of Wright Street, approximately 600 feet south of the intersection with Enterprise Avenue. Groundwater contamination is typically found in the shallow aquifer (at 15 to 40 feet in depth). The plume was initially estimated as 300 feet long by 100 feet wide with a maximum total volatile organic compound concentration of 27,000 micrograms per liter in 1993. The selected remedy for Area F was In-Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) recirculating injected potassium permanganate and groundwater extraction, which would control groundwater flow paths within the contaminated plume to prevent migration while oxidizing the volatile organic compounds. Also, implementation of groundwater use restrictions until remedial action objectives were achieved was also selected to provide protection of human health. ISCO was never implemented based on changed site conditions. The Navy is currently conducting a groundwater cleanup action at Area F. This site will be included in the OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow. An Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test is being conducted in 2015.
OU 00003 Area G (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_3512) Volatile organic compounds ROD (2000)
Remedial Investigation Addendum (2015)
Area G located near Area F at the south end of OU 3, underlies Buildings 791, 759, and 777, and overlaps PSC 15, PSC 16, and Kemen Test Cell and Hush House PCA plumes. Area G may be impacted by migration of volatile organic compounds from PSC 15. Groundwater contamination is typically found in the shallow aquifer (at 10 to 60 feet in depth). The maximum total volatile organic compound concentration detected in 1993 was 4,900 micrograms per liter at 15 feet below ground surface. The Navy is currently conducting a groundwater cleanup action at Area G. This site will be included in the OU 3 Remedial Investigation Addendum and a Feasibility Study Addendum, with a ROD amendment to follow. Continued monitoring of Area G is ongoing. An Enhanced Bioremediation Pilot Test is being conducted in 2015

 

OU 4 – Casa Linda Lake

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
OU 4, SITE 00021 Casa Linda Lake (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1024) Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls ROD (2000)

OU 4, Casa Linda Lake, is an 11-acre manmade surface water retention basin within the east-central portion of NAS Jacksonville. Casa Linda Lake is bordered on the east, south, and west by Casa Linda Oaks Golf Course. The lake receives storm water runoff from the central portion of NAS Jacksonville and the sediment is a natural filter to remove contaminants from the collected surface water prior to discharge to St. Johns River at Mulberry Cove. Most fairways and greens of the golf course are south of the lake, and one green is on a peninsula within the lake.

A fish kill within Casa Linda Lake occurred on May 6, 1979. The fish kill was caused by application of the pesticide Dasanit (fensulfothion) on the golf course and subsequent heavy rains that resulted in overland flow that transported the pesticide into the lake. Surface water and sediment samples collected in 1983 indicated that there were impacts in the sediment and surface water that were not attributable to the pesticide release, but likely the result of storm water inputs into the lake.

The ROD for OU 4 was signed on 6 September 2000. The remedial alternative selected was Monitoring with Institutional and Passive Habitat Controls including: 1) Institutional Controls comprised of use restrictions and advisory signs; 2) monitoring of Casa Linda Lake in accordance with NAS Jacksonville storm water management programs, including Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan and Best Management Practices, which has since been discontinued, since there was nothing problematic ever found; 3) control of habitats in the vicinity of Casa Linda Lake via passive habitat control. Water from Casa Linda Lake is used to irrigate the golf course. Fishing, catch and release only, is allowed in Casa Linda Lake.

 

OU 5 – South Antenna Field

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 51, SITE 00051 Former Firefighting Training Area (FFTA) and Former Oil Disposal Area (ODA) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1024) Hydraulic fluids, fuel, oil, radiological waste from aircraft ROD (17 August 2005)

OU 5 is an approximately 5-acre area comprised of a relatively flat grassy field, gently sloping to the southeast to an unnamed creek at the south boundary of the installation. The creek discharges approximately 4,000 feet away into the St. Johns River. The Former FFTA (a nearly circular area, 60 foot diameter) and Former ODA (circular area, 50-foot diameter) aerial limits are relatively indistinguishable because they were excavated and backfilled, and have been allowed to re-vegetate over the past 15 years. Approximately 1,000 cubic yards of radiological-contaminated soil was excavated from the Former FFTA and Former ODA, and drummed sludge that was buried at the ODA site, were transported to OU 1 landfill and contained under a 40-mil liner and 3 feet of clean soil. The ROD was signed 17 August 2005. OU 5 final remedy consists of the following four main components: (1) institutional controls, (2) natural attenuation monitoring, (3) groundwater and surface water monitoring and reporting, and (4) contingency remedy, in the event that groundwater discharges to the unnamed creek at levels exceeding the surface water remedial goals or if natural attenuation does not effectively reduce groundwater contaminants within the required timeframe.

This site is in a long-term monitoring program.

 

OU 6 – Hangar 1000

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 52, SITE 00052, SWMU 00001 Hangar 1000 (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_2945) Waste oils and chlorinated solvents ROD (March 2007)

Hangar 1000 (PSC 52) is the location of OU 6, which is comprised of two former underground storage tanks (USTs), Tanks A and B, installed in the late 1960s and removed in 1994. Hangar 1000 is part of FRCSE, the largest tenant command on NAS Jacksonville, which performs various support functions for Navy aircraft, designated weapons systems, and accessories and equipment. Hangar 1000 is southwest of the John Towers Field flight line and north of Yorktown Avenue. Hangar 1000 is a hexagonal structure with an open rectangular area dividing the south side, which creates a keyway. The keyway fronts the north side of Yorktown Avenue and is the main Hangar 1000 entrance. The remaining sides of Hangar 1000 have sliding bay doors for aircraft entry. Tank A was a 750 gallon capacity concrete tank used as an oil-water separator. Tank B was a 2000-gallon capacity steel UST, which received oil overflow from Tank A and waste oils and solvents discharged from wash racks and floor drains located inside the Hangar’s maintenance facilities. The tanks were interconnected with 2-, 4-, and 6-inch diameter metal piping. Historical documentation indicates that during periods of heavy rainfall, water in the storm sewer would back into the oil-water separator (Tank A), which was not designed to prevent back flow. It is presumed that back flow into the separator may have resulted in releases to the environment. The area surrounding Hangar 1000 is topographically flat with surface runoff diverted via grated drains to the NAS Jacksonville storm water drainage system. Storm drains discharge to a 5-foot-diameter underground storm sewer conduit buried approximately 8 feet below ground surface on the south side of Yorktown Avenue. Groundwater begins to infiltrate the storm sewer slightly upgradient of the contaminant plume. The storm sewer drains east and empties into an unnamed concrete-lined drainage ditch (PSC 44) that flows south to the St. Johns River, located approximately 2,000 feet southeast of Hangar 1000. The land use at Hangar 1000 is industrial and there are no plans to discontinue industrial military operations involving aircraft services at this location.

Volatile organic compounds (primarily chlorinated solvents), semivolatile organic compounds, and petroleum-based constituents are present in shallow groundwater of the surficial aquifer at OU 6 at concentrations exceeding Florida Department of Environmental Protection Groundwater Cleanup Target Levels. An interim remedial action consisting of chemical oxidation treatment of suspected source areas, was conducted in 2000 and 2001 with initial contaminant reduction; subsequent groundwater sampling determined that dissolved-phase concentrations rebounded following each source area treatment.

The ROD was signed in March 2007. The individual components of the selected remedial action for groundwater at OU 6 include source reduction through iron Nanoparticle injection, monitored natural attenuation of groundwater, Land Use Controls, and groundwater and surface water monitoring. This site is in a long-term monitoring program.

 

OU 7 – Former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO), now known as Defense Logistics Agency, Disposition Services Jacksonville

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 46, SITE 00046 Former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_998) Airplane parts, including rubber, leather, metal, and glass; batteries; transformers; vehicles; appliances; scrap materials; various chemicals; furniture; storage vessels; ammunition explosives and dangerous articles such as empty shells, ammunition cans, and range residue ROD (September 2005)

OU 7 (PSC 46) is the Former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO), an 11.5-acre wedge-shaped parcel outside the southwest corner of NAS Jacksonville on the west side of Roosevelt Boulevard (U.S. Highway 17). The DRMO has been in operation since 1939. The yard first served as a smelter for airplanes. Later, DRMO arranged the transfer and disposal of used petroleum products, out-of-service transformers, and hazardous wastes generated at NAS Jacksonville. These materials were stored both outside and inside the buildings at the DRMO yard. The DRMO stored used electrical transformers and battery cases on the southern and western parts of the yard, respectively. The transformers may have contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). During a radiation survey in 1998, elevated radiation exposure readings were encountered in various areas at DRMO. It was determined that these elevated readings were associated with the soil rather than with items stored at the facility. In 2007, contractors excavating behind DRMO discovered four unexploded ordnance (UXOs). The UXOs were removed and disposed of.

The DRMO was renamed the Defense Logistics Agency, Disposition Services Jacksonville in 2011. The DRMO’s mission is to provide a means for disposal of surplus Navy equipment, supplies, and scrap materials stored within a fenced yard prior to sale to the public. The wedge-shaped parcel is oriented north to south, with an approximately 120-foot wide north border and 650-foot wide south border. The east border is a drainage ditch outside the DRMO fence that parallels Roosevelt Boulevard (U.S. Highway 17). A driveway that crosses the ditch near the approximate center of the east border provides vehicle access to the facility from Roosevelt Boulevard. The west fenced border is paralleled by a drainage ditch, beyond which is an active CSX rail line used by passenger and cargo trains. The east and west outer ditches are not hydraulically connected to each other; both discharge south toward Interstate 295.

The ROD for OU 7 was signed on 9 September 2005. The selected remedial action included excavation and disposal of soil to eliminate radiation-contaminated soil exposure risk and soil with contaminants of concern exceeding direct exposure commercial/industrial Soil Cleanup Target Levels, Land Use Controls preventing unacceptable exposure to residual soil and groundwater contamination that remains on site, monitoring natural attenuation in groundwater annually, contingent remedy if: (1) the implemented Land Use Controls fail to prevent unacceptable risks from exposure to on-site soil and/or groundwater contamination; (2) contaminated groundwater migrates to an unacceptable degree; or (3) the contaminant of concern concentrations in groundwater do not attenuate as expected. OU 7 is currently being monitored under the long-term groundwater monitoring program. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

 

OU 8 – Buildings 536 (Pesticide Shop) and 937 (former Disease Vector Ecology and Control Center, now known as Naval Entomology Center of Excellence)

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 47, SITE 00047, SWMU 00004 (DVECC) Buildings 536 (Pesticide Shop) and 937 (former Disease Vector Ecology and Control Center, now known as Naval Entomology Center of Excellence) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_999) Pesticides, herbicides, diesel fuel ROD (September 2008)

OU 8 (PSC 47) is comprised of Building 536 and Building 937, known as the Pesticide Shop and former Disease Vector Ecology and Control Center (DVECC), respectively, now the Naval Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE). Building 536 was used for development of pesticide management programs, training, and pesticide mixing and storage from the 1960s until 1978, when Building 937 was dedicated for that purpose. Building 536 is currently used by NAS Jacksonville to administer landscaping services, store and maintain grounds landscaping and lawn care equipment, and store pesticides for the nearby Casa Linda Oaks golf course. Building 937 is used by NECE for pesticide development programs, training, and research and development.
OU 8 is west of Child Street, approximately 600 feet south of Birmingham Avenue at NAS Jacksonville. The site encompasses approximately 4.2 acres of relatively flat terrain, with landscaped turf grass and mature trees on portions not covered by structures and pavement. Building 536 is a rectangular structure, approximately 360 feet long by 28 feet wide, oriented east-to-west. Building 937 is an L-shaped two-story office building with an east wing that parallels Child Street and a south wing situated east to west. The north end of the east wing is nearest to (approximately 95 feet from) Building 536.

The ROD for OU 8 was signed on 26 September 2008. The selected remedy for soil includes excavation and off-site disposal to allow industrial use, capping to prevent leaching, Land Use Controls, and monitoring. The selected remedy for groundwater includes monitoring, to verify the effectiveness of the cap and to evaluate the potential leaching of soil contaminants into groundwater, and Land Use Controls. Groundwater at OU 7 is currently being monitored in a long-term groundwater monitoring program. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

 

OU 9 – Potential Source of Contamination 45 – Building 200 Wash Rack

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 45, SITE 00045 Building 200 Wash Rack (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_997) Waste oils and chlorinated solvents Remedial Investigation/EECA

PSC 45 is the location of the former Building 200 Wash Rack Disposal Pit. The pit was located approximately 2 feet east of the Building 200 Wash Rack area. This area is an outbuilding attached to the northwestern corner of Building 200. The pit was gravel lined with an earthen bottom and a concrete lid approximately 4 feet in diameter. It was a French drain design and, as such, the fluids in the pit leached directly into the subsurface soil or, during periods of heavy rains and an elevated water table surface, into the groundwater. The pit was connected via an underground pipeline to an in-ground oil/water separator located beneath the Building 200 Wash Rack. A small grassy area surrounds the former disposal pit, and a paved parking lot is located north of this grassy area. A soil removal action was completed in 2013.

Site 000045, PSC 45 is currently in the Feasibility Study Stage for Operable Unit 9. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

 

NOTE: OU 10 is located under the Munitions Response Program Section

OU 11 – PSC Sites (5, 8/55, 9, 18, 29, 31, 32, 44, and 50) with Land Use Controls and no ROD

Each of the seven PSC sites has similar physical characteristics, but each site presents slight differences associated with the source of contaminated material and therefore the chemicals of potential concern vary slightly between sites. Harding Lawson Associates conducted a study on the seven PSC sites and determined that there were a number of analytes detected above the FDEP Soil Cleanup Target Levels and Groundwater Cleanup Target Levels in place at the time the reports were published (1999).

Land use controls (LUCs) were originally developed for the seven PSC sites based upon the findings in a series of reports developed by Harding Lawson Associates. The LUCs are used to bound the areas in each PSC that are restricted, through land deed modifications, to industrial/ commercial use only. Under Chapter 62-780 of the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), statistical analysis can be used to define the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination. Such a definition is required before one can establish LUC boundaries. It was determined that the sample sizes associated with 1997 data were not large enough to support a statistical analysis on those data. It was also determined that the horizontal and vertical extents of contamination have not been defined; therefore, the current proposed LUC boundaries do not meet the requirements of Chapter 62-780, F.A.C., and further investigation is warranted. A Remedial Investigation and Feasibility study is underway these sites. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

PSC 18 (fill area) and PSC 44 (drainage ditch) do not require further investigation, but will be included in the Final Record of Decision for these PSC Sites.

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 5, SITE 00005 Shoreline Fill West of the Fuel Barge Dock (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1015) Paint waste (including radiological) Sampling Event Report

The Shoreline Fill Area West of the Fuel Barge Dock was identified as a PSC during the Initial Assessment Study (IAS) (Fred C. Hart Associates, Inc., 1983) and stretches along the shoreline of the St. Johns River from east of runway 14 to Catapult Road and the fuel barge dock. The IAS report defined PSC 5 as approximately 200 feet wide by 600 feet long. The area designated as PSC 5 was later extended to encompass an area approximately 300 feet wide by 2,100 feet long. PSC 5 is accessible by foot from Catapult Road, where it meets the fuel barge dock.

Site 00005, PSC 5 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 8/55, SITE 00008 Vacant Lot East of the Fuel Farm/Sludge Disposal Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1018 and DID_7_2794) Sediment and Sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plant Sampling Event Report

PSC 8 is a vacant lot east of Gas Hill (PSC 7) off Catapult Road. PSC 8 is approximately 200 feet wide by 2,000 feet long and is accessible from Catapult Road. It is located near the flight line and is inaccessible to most people at NAS Jacksonville. The eastern part is densely vegetated with bamboo and other shrubbery that limits access to this area. The site is mostly flat and slopes gently to the east. A drainage ditch, which flows east from Catapult Road to the St. Johns River, runs through the center of PSC 8. Groundwater flow is toward the east.
PSC 55 is a suspected sludge disposal area that is heavily wooded and contains vast vegetation that may be associated with wet low-lying areas that drain into the St. Johns River.

PSCs 8 and 55 were combined and reclassified as PSC 8/55 in March 2013.

Site 00008, PSC 8/55 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 9, SITE 00009 Old Disposal Area East of the Fuel Farm (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1019) Garbage, Construction Debris Sampling Event Report

The Old Disposal Area East of the Fuel Farm was identified as a PSC during the IAS. According to the IAS report, the site contained garbage, construction debris, and a few 55-gallon drums that were disposed of from 1977 to 1978. PSC 9 is located near the shoreline of the St. Johns River, just north and east of the main east-west runway. The site is approximately 200 feet wide by 400 feet long and is accessible from Catapult Road. The proximity of PSC 9 to the flight line makes it inaccessible to most people. PSC 9 has dense ground cover and shrubs, which also limits access to the site. The shoreline near PSC 9 is built up with concrete rubble and bricks. PSC 9 is located between two drainage ditches that flow east to the St. Johns River. The site is mostly flat and gently slopes to the east. Storm water runoff and groundwater flow is generally east toward the St. Johns River. The Verification Study Report concluded that the specific conductance of the groundwater at PSC 9 was influenced by the brackish water of the St. Johns River and that the river is a discharge point for groundwater.

Site 00009, PSC 9 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 18, SITE 00018 Fill Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1022) Fill area No Further Remedial Action Planned with maintenance of existing land use controls
PSC 18 is bounded by Birmingham Avenue to the north, Mulberry Cove to the south, and two drainage channels on the east and west sides. PSC 18 was identified as a PSC during the initial assessment study (IAS) and is located at the northeast corner of Mulberry Cove, which is part of the St. Johns River. Radioactive radium paint waste from aircraft instrument dial stripping operations during World War II were disposed of at the Radium Paint Waste Disposal Pit (PSC 13) until the late 1950s. During the late 1950s approximately 1,500 cubic feet of contaminated soil were excavated from PSC 13 and disposed of near the shoreline of Mulberry Cover, near Marina No. 1. This area was built up 3 to 5 feet with the fill material. When excavated from PSC 13, radiation measurements of the soil to be deposited at PSC 18 were 3 to 5 millirems per hour (mR/hr). Measurements taken during a site visit for the IAS reported levels that were not significantly above background readings (0015 mR/hr). The IAS report did not recommend a confirmation (verification) study, stating that the site was already cleaned up and, thus, posed no threat to human health or the environment. The Naval Sea Systems command Detachment, Radiological Affairs Support Office (RASO) conducted a radiological survey of the area. Elevated readings in the actual dump site and the bank of the drainage channel adjacent to Mulberry Cove. Remediation activities were conducted and included excavation of contaminated soil from three areas within PSC 18, the West Park Area, the Marina Area, and the East Cove Area. Prior to the interim removal action (IRA), the area was covered with short shrubs and grass and was surrounded by silt fence. After the IRA, the site was hydroseeded and the fence removed. Picnic areas are located on the east and west sides of PSC 18, and the marina is located to the southeast. In 1998 the FDEP and the EPA concurred with the recommendation for No Further Remedial Action Planned with the maintenance of existing land use controls unless current site use changes or the property is to be transferred. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.
PSC 29, SITE 00029 Organic Disposal Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_972) Construction Debris, metal, drums, creosote covered material, abrasive material Sampling Event Report

PSC 29 is located to the east of Patrol Road near the southwest corner of NAS Jacksonville. It occupies approximately 15 acres and is relatively flat with debris piles. Crushed drums, construction debris, metal, abrasive material, creosote covered material, and polyvinyl chloride pipe has been observed at the site, though it was designated as an organic disposal area. Since March 1991, NAS Jacksonville restricted access to PSC 29 and limited disposal to clean construction, demolition debris, dirt, street sweepings, organic material for landscaping, grass clippings, trees, stumps, and clean lumber. This landfill was closed to all activity in 2003.

Site 00029, PSC 29 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 31, SITE 00031 Former Asphalt Mixing Area (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_981) Leaking drums containing asphalt/PCB-oil mix materials Sampling Event Report

PSC 31 is located inside the Public Works Materials Laydown Area. It is approximately 1/3 acre in size and includes Building 1969 and the surrounding unpaved, graded gravel area. Leaking drums containing asphalt mix materials were reported to have been stored at this site. It is possible the oils used to mix the asphalt contained PCBs.

PSC 31 is generally flat with unlined drainage ditches to the west and east of the Laydown Area. At the time of the investigation, large piles of crushed limerock were present at the site. The site is accessible by a paved road and locked gate. The Laydown Area surrounding PSC 31 contains piles of construction debris.

Site 000031, PSC 31 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 32, SITE 00032 Ex-Base Landfill (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_983) Soil, refuse, construction debris, junked vehicles Sampling Event Report

PSC 32, the Ex-Base Landfill, is located east of Building 144 and 147. PSC 32 originally occupied approximately 1½ acres; however, in 1990, the debris was combined into one mound occupying approximately 1/3 acre to the south. PSC 32 had been used during the 1960s for the disposal of soil, refuse, construction debris, and junked vehicles. In addition, dumpsters were present at PSC 32 to collect large household refuse such as appliances. The mound associated with the landfill was estimated to be nearly 300 feet long, 50 feet wide, and about 5 feet high.

The area surrounding PSC 32 is relatively flat. According to the Topographic and Drainage Map contained in the IAS report, PSC 32 is within the drainage basin of the Ortega River, approximately ¾ mile to the west. Groundwater is thought to flow to the southwest toward drainage ditches and tributary streams to the Ortega River. Storm water runoff likely flows toward the drainage ditch to the west-southwest of PSC 32.

Site 000032, PSC 32 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

PSC 44, Site 00044 Drainage Ditch West of Ajax Street (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_996) Waste oils and solvents, hydraulic fluids No Further Remedial Action Planned with maintenance of existing land use controls
PSC 44 is the drainage ditch west of Ajax Street from Yorktown Avenue to Mulberry Cove. A possible source of contamination in the ditch had been identified as the overflow of two interconnected underground storage tanks (Tanks A and B) located in the “keyway” of Hangar 1000. NAS Jacksonville personnel reported witnessing the tanks overflow on numerous occasions when the tanks’ storage capacities were exceeded. Interviews indicate that overflows from Tanks A and B, which contained hazardous materials, could have discharged to PSC 44 via connections to the storm sewer. PSC 44 received runoff from roads, parking lots, and other drainage ditches. Cadmium, lead, 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and several pesticides exceeded both EPA Region 4 and FDEP sediment screening criteria. Sediment toxicity testing conducted on samples collected from the drainage ditch and from a nearby reference area demonstrated no ecological risk. In 1998 the EPA concurred with the recommendation for No Further Remedial Action Planned (NFRAP), based on acceptable human health and ecological risk for both current and possible future residential land use. The FDEP concurred with recommendation for NFRAP, but due to human health risk exceedances of FDEP’s limit of 1x10-6 for a residential scenario, indicated that land use controls should be implemented.
More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.
PSC 50, SITE 00050 East Side Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) Sludge Drying Beds (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_1001) Buried wastewater treatment plant sludge Sampling Event Report

PSC 50 is located south of the east end of the 9/27 taxiway and east of Bravo taxiway. The original East Side WWTP area was approximately 1 to 2 acres. The ground slopes gently from the paved area towards unlined drainage ditches to the south and east. The area is flat with an elevation of 7 to 8 feet above mean sea level. The facility was demolished after January 1975 and is now paved. After the East Side WWTP was demolished, the remaining sludge from the digesters and the sludge drying beds was dumped in a pit on the site and buried.

Site 000050, PSC 50 is currently in the Remedial Investigation Stage for Operable Unit 11.

 

OU 12 – PSC 38 – Torpedo Rework Facility

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 38, SITE 00038 Torpedo Rework Facility (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_973) Metals, VOCs, SVOCs, Pesticides, PCBs Site Assessment

The Torpedo Rework Facility was identified as PSC 38 by NAS Jacksonville personnel in 1983. The Torpedo Rework Facility encompasses approximately 2.5 acres within the restricted Magazine Area in the central-western portion of NAS Jacksonville. The site is surrounded by an 8-foot high fence and is accessible from Allegheny Road via a paved driveway, but access is limited to Navy personnel with weapons clearance. There are three buildings within PSC 38: Building 327, the Torpedo Rework Facility; Building 367, the Bulk Waste Storage Area; and Building 330, a storage building for paint and hazardous materials. A series of investigations, in which data were collected, indicated impacts to both soils and groundwater beneath PSC 38. A soil removal action was completed in 2015 for PSC 38 to mitigate contaminated soils above industrial risk-based target levels. Groundwater will be addressed through monitoring.

PSC 38, SITE 00038 is in the Feasibility Study Phase. More site related background information is available in the Naval Installation Restoration Program Plan Remedial Response Decision System Volume 2 Appendix D.

 

PSC Sites Investigated Under CERCLA that are not Operable Units

Site Site Description Waste Type Regulatory Status
PSC 56, SITE 00056 NEX Gas Station (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_984) Petroleum Product and Chlorinated Solvents Site Assessment

The NEX Gas Station is located on the west side of the NAS, at the corner of Birmingham Avenue and Allegheny Road. It is an active gas station for NAS Jacksonville personnel. The NEX Gas Station has had historical release(s) and was originally designated as PSC 33 and granted No Further Remedial Action Planned (NFRAP) status in 1994, based on an exclusion from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as a petroleum site. The site was transferred to the petroleum program and designated as PCA 1. Two UST areas exist at the site. The first UST area included Tanks 01 through 05 and is located on the north and east sides of the site and was the site of a prior release and remediation effort. In a letter dated August 12, 2002, the FDEP approved No Further Action (NFA) for the initial release. In April 2006, two former 10,000 gallon USTs designated as Tanks 880-6 and 880-7, located on the southern side of the NEX Gas Station site, and associated tank pipelines were removed from this site.

The Navy conducted site assessment activities from 2008 through 2010 sampling groundwater and soil in the area.

During the investigation, both petroleum and chlorinated constituents were detected in groundwater. Due to the presence of chlorinated constituents, the site was transferred from the petroleum program to the CERCLA program and a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study is planned for this site.

PSC 57, SITE 00057 S-3 High Power Turn-up Pad (HPTP) (OCULUS ID: DOD_7_2887) Chlorinated Solvents Site Inspection

PSC 57 is located northeast of the runway and within an isolated portion of the restricted flight line area. The flight line is surrounded by a fence and access controlled gates. The S-3 HPTP itself is no longer in use and a rectangular concrete pad, approximately 60 feet wide by 125 feet in length is all that remains. The pavement associated with the taxiway leading up to pad and the apron surrounding the pad was removed in 2011. Prior to the construction of the S-3 HPTP in August 1997, a HPTP used for A7 aircraft occupied the same general area. Petroleum related impacts were discovered in June 1997 while demolishing the old A7 HPTP. The contaminated soil was excavated during the demolition activities and transported to an off-site thermal treatment unit for disposal. The source and release date are unknown but estimated to be prior to 1978, which was the last time the A7s performed high power turn-ups at the pad. During site inspection activities conducted in 2001, vinyl chloride was detected in two wells exceeding the FDEP GCTL of 1 µg/L; additionally, chlorinated VOCs 1,2 dichloroethene and trichloroethene were also detected in groundwater, but at a concentration less than their respective GCTL.

Site 00057, PSC 57 is currently in the Site Investigation stage.

Site 00058 Carbon Tetrachloride site north and northeast of Building 200 Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene  
While investigating PSC 45, Building 200 wash rack, an anomalous chemical was detected northeast of the Building 200 site. A review of the PSC 45, Phase II Remedial Investigation data from the areas to the north and northeast (DPT 14, DPT 21, DPT 13, DPT 22, and DPT 12) shows that those results are distinctly different from the chemical profiles of other sampling locations at PSC 45. For example carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene are not detected in the any of the sampling locations south of DPT 12. These results suggests that a secondary source of contamination originating somewhere immediately north of PSC 45 is likely to be responsible for impacts to groundwater in that area. Based on review of this information, the Navy determined that additional investigation into this possible second source area should be conducted as a separate site and that further investigation of the area to the north and northeast of PSC 45 is not warranted as part of the PSC 45 RI. A Site Inspection is planned for this area.

 

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