Environmental

Site Descriptions

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Site Background

Commissioned in 1943, Naval Air Station Whiting Field is located in Santa Rosa County, approximately 5.5 miles north of Milton and 25 miles northeast of Pensacola, Florida. Naval Air Station Whiting Field's mission is to provide primary fixed-wing, propeller-driven aircraft and advanced helicopter training. The facility is approximately 3,842 acres in size and consists of two air fields (North and South) separated by an industrial area. Past waste handling practices at Naval Air Station Whiting Field have resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater with petroleum constituents and spent solvents. Through the early 1980s, construction and demolition debris, garbage, waste solvents and oils, tank bottom sludges, fuels and machine fluids were disposed in several different locations at the facility, which was the practice at that time. Three on-site wells currently supply Naval Air Station Whiting Field. In 1986, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection requested that one drinking water supply well be shut down due to concentrations of benzene exceeding the State drinking water standard. Within one month, the State similarly requested that an additional drinking water supply well be shut down due to concentrations of trichloroethylene exceeding state drinking water standards. These wells were retrofitted with a charcoal filter system and returned to service. This drinking water treatment system meets State drinking water standards.

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Operable Unit 1, Site 1 – Northwest Disposal Area

Site 1, Northwest Disposal Area, is a 5-acre parcel, located along the northwestern facility boundary. The site is characterized by a surface depression gently sloping toward a drainage outlet located along the southwestern site boundary. Site 1 is currently forested with pine trees, which are approximately 30 feet high. According to the Initial Assessment Study, general refuse and wastes associated with operation and maintenance of aircraft at the station may have been disposed of at this site from 1943 until 1965. Anecdotal evidence suggests this may include unknown quantities of waste paints, paint thinners, solvents, waste oils, and hydraulic fluids.

The Remedial Investigation for Site 1 was completed in August 1998. The goal of the investigation was to collect data to determine the nature and extent of releases of site-derived contaminants; identify potential pathways of migration via the vadose zone and soil; and evaluate risks to human and ecological receptors. During the Remedial Investigation surface soil and subsurface soil at Site 1 were sampled. Arsenic was identified as a constituent of concern for surface soil at the site. No analytes were detected in the subsurface soil sample at concentrations that exceeded the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Soil Clean-up Target Levels.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 1, as documented in the September 1999 Record of Decision (HLA, 1999). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 1 restrict land use to non-residential use. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires inspections to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 1 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 1. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Base-wide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

Operable Unit 2, Site 2 – Northwest Open Disposal Area

 

Site 2, Northwest Open Disposal Area, is a 12-acre parcel, located along the northwestern facility boundary. The site was used for disposal of construction and demolition debris from 1976 until 1984. Currently, the site is characterized by a surface depression. At its lowest point, the bottom elevation is approximately 30 feet below the surrounding land surface. Surface drainage within the borrow pit is down the partially vegetated side slopes to low areas near the middle of the pit where infiltration into the soil occurs.

The Remedial Investigation for Site 2 was completed in December 1998. The goal of the investigation was to collect data to determine the nature and extent of releases of site-derived contaminants, identify potential pathways of migration via the vadose zone and soil, and evaluate risks to human and ecological receptors. The results of the Remedial Investigation indicated a human health risk associated with exposure to arsenic in the soil based upon the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Level. However, subsequent soil analysis at Naval Air Station Whiting Field indicated that the concentration of arsenic at Site 2 is consistent with naturally occurring concentrations found elsewhere at the installation. Therefore, it was determined that the arsenic at the site is not a constituent of concern.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 2, as documented in the September 1999 Record of Decision (HLA, 1999). Since waste was left onsite, 5-Year Reviews were required to assess the protectiveness of the remedy. After the first 5-Year Review, and the finding that arsenic was naturally occurring, the no action remedy was selected. This change in remedy is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 2 (Tetra Tech, 2008). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 2. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater ), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 3, Site 3 – Underground Waste Solvent Storage Area

Site 3, Underground Waste Solvent Storage Area, is a discontinuous site including the areas at the north and south ends of Building 2941. The site extends southward to include the Paint Locker, Building 2987. The site includes the location of former waste solvent underground storage tanks and former waste oil underground storage tanks. The site includes an area where two 500-gallon metal underground storage tanks were used from 1980 until April 1984 for the storage of waste solvents and residue generated form paint-stripping operations conducted at Building 2941. The two tanks were removed in 1984. Site 3 also includes the area where a waste oil underground storage tank was located near the southwestern corner of Building 2941. This tank was used for storage of airframe, power plant, and ground support equipment liquid waste from 1968, and possibly earlier, until 1986 when it was removed.

The Remedial Investigation for Site 3 was completed in 1998. The Human Health Risk Assessment, a portion of the Remedial Investigation, indicated contamination at the site posed unacceptable risks to human receptors from exposure to surface soil based on a residential land use scenario. Arsenic and dieldrin were initially identified as the constituents of concern. The human health risk assessment was subsequently revised based on changes to risk screening criteria and a determination that arsenic concentrations observed at Site 3 were consistent with naturally occurring concentrations. Based upon the revised human health risk assessment only one constituent, dieldrin, was selected as a surface soil constituent of potential concern. The dieldrin concentrations observed at Site 3 were not greater than the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Level for direct residential exposure. No subsurface constituents of potential concern were identified.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no action remedy for Site 3. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision for Site 3 (Tetra Tech, 2004). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 3. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 5, Site 5A – Battery Acid Seepage Pit

Site 5A, Battery Acid Seepage Pit, consists of Building 1478 and the surrounding land and is located north of the Midfield Maintenance Hangar, Building 1454 (Site 33). The Battery Shop was the site of battery waste acid and electrolyte solution disposal from 1967 until 1984. Waste solutions with sodium bicarbonate and tap water were poured down the drain of a sink in the building and discharged to a dry well west of the building. The sink drain was disconnected from the dry well in 1984 and connected to the sanitary sewer. An estimated 180 gallons of battery waste electrolyte solution were discharged to the dry well annually during the period of operation.

The Remedial Investigation for Site 5A was completed in 2005. Surface soil sampling was conducted at Site 5A to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 5A included three pesticides, one polychlorinated biphenyl, and 19 inorganic analytes. Three constituents of potential concern (Aroclor-1260, Dieldrin, and Chromium) were identified in the Remedial Investigation and no human health risks were identified for exposure to surface soils at Site 5A. Subsurface soil borings were advanced and soil samples were collected for 1-2 feet below land surface and visually inspected for discoloration (indicating possible pesticide/PCB contamination). No discoloration was observed. Because the surface soil did not indicate the presence of pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls above Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels, it was assumed that it is not likely pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls exist in the subsurface soil at Site 5A above Florid Soil Cleanup Target Levels.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no action remedy for Site 5A. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision for Site 5A (Tetra Tech, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 5A. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 6, Site 6 – South Transformer Oil Disposal Area

 

 

Site 6, South Transformer Oil Disposal Area, is a parcel of land approximately 1.1-acres in size located southeast of the Midfield Maintenance Hangar, Building 1454 (Site 33). At Site 6, from the 1940s until 1964, transformer fluids were reportedly drained into the grassed ditch east of Building 1454. This transformer fluid (dielectric fluid) likely contained polychlorinated biphenyls. Runoff from the grassed ditch drains in a northeasterly direction and eventually into Big Coldwater Creek, approximately 2.3 miles east of the disposal site.

The Remedial Investigation for Site 6 was completed in 1999. Surface soil sampling was conducted at Site 6 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at site 6 included volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons , pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic analytes. Additionally, subsurface soil samples contained six semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, and inorganic analytes. The original human health risk assessment conducted during the Remedial Investigation indicated the carcinogenic risk drivers for Site 6 were benzo(a)pyrene and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons.

In May 2002, an Interim Remedial Action was conducted, with the objective of removing surface and subsurface soil at Site 6 with concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons exceeding Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Industrial Soil Cleanup Target Levels. Approximately 37 cubic yards of contaminated soil was excavated and transported to an approved off-site disposal facility. Post-removal soil sampling events in September 2003 and January 2004 indicated no chemical concentrations that exceeded residential standards. Due to changed conditions at the site and changes in regulatory risk screening criteria, a revised human health risk assessment was conducted and present in the Feasibility Study Amendment (TtNUS, 2004). Based upon residential land-use criteria, the Feasibility Study Amendment concluded No Further Action was necessary for surface and subsurface soils at Site 6.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no further action remedy for Site 6. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 6 (TtNUS, 2004). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 6. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 8, Site 9 – Waste Fuel Disposal Pit

Site 9, Waste Fuel Disposal Pit, is a parcel of land approximately 2-acres in size that is located on the eastern boundary of Naval Air Station Whiting Field. Site 9 was used for the disposal of an undetermined amount of waste aviation fuel. During the 1950s and 1960s, waste fuel containing tetraethyl lead was reportedly disposed of in the northern portion of Site 9. Reportedly, a tanker truck was used to transport waste fuel to an unlined disposal pit where the contents of the truck were drained. Based upon anecdotal information, approximately 200 to 300 gallons of waste fuel were disposed of at the site per trip. The total quantity of fuel disposed of at the site is unknown.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 9 in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil was sampled to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 9 included two semi-volatile organic compounds and 19 inorganic analytes. One constituent of potential concern, antimony, was identified; however, it was not retained as a constituent of concern following the human health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment. Based upon the results of a soil gas survey indicating no subsurface contamination, subsurface soil sampling was not conducted.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no further action remedy for Site 9. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 9 (TtNUS, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 9. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 9, Site 10 – Southeast Open Disposal Area A

Site 10, Southeast Open Disposal A, is located along the eastern facility boundary near the South Air Field and is approximately 4 acres in size. From 1965 until 1973, this site was used for the disposal of inert wastes such as construction debris, trees, brush, metal cans, and similar materials not suitable for sanitary landfill disposal. Transformer oil and empty pesticide/herbicide containers were also reportedly disposed at the site. The precise locations of the disposal area at Site 10 are unknown; however, the approximate location of the disposal area was determined based upon a geophysical survey.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 10 in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 10 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 10 included two volatile organic compounds, 18 semi-volatile organic compounds, 10 pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls, 21 inorganic analytes, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, and cyanide. Only carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, barium and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons were identified as constituents of concern following the revised risk assessment for surface soils at Site 10. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 10 included five volatile organic compounds, eight semi-volatile organic compounds, five pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls, 22 inorganic constituents, and cyanide. No constituents of concern were identified following the revised risk assessment for surface soils at Site 10.

An Interim Remedial Action was undertaken in 1999 to emplace a 24-inch soil cover to prevent exposure to surface soil contamination.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the Land Use Control remedy for Site 10. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 10 (TtNUS, 2007). Soil contamination remains at Site 10; therefore, the remedy consists of land use controls to address unacceptable risk. The land use controls in the form of institutional controls and engineering controls will be implanted to prohibit residential development and eliminate unacceptable risks from exposure to contaminated soil, buried wastes, and debris at the site. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 10 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The institution controls prohibit residential use and digging, disturbing, or removing of the existing soil cover. The engineering controls include the existing soil cover and warning signage placed along the boundary of the site. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 10. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Base-wide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 10, Site 11 – Southeast Open Disposal Area B

Site 11, Southeast Open Disposal Area B, is an old borrow pit used as an open disposal area from 1943 until approximately 1970. Site 11 is approximately 3 acres in size and is located along the southeastern facility boundary near the South Air Field. The site received a wide variety of wastes including general refuse, construction debris, tree clippings, furniture, waste solvents, paint, transformer oils, hydraulic fluid, and various other oils. When disposal operations were discontinued in 1970, a permeable native soil covering was placed over the site, and pine trees were planted. Currently, Site 11 consists of vacant, unused land covered with dense native vegetation and pine trees.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 11 was completed in 2000. Surface soil and subsurface soil was sampled to determine the nature and extent of contamination at Site 11. Benzo(a)pyrene, 4,4’-DDT, alpha-chlordane, gamma- chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, lead, and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in surface soil at concentrations that exceeded the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels. Only dieldrin and lead were identified as constituents of concern following risk assessment for surface soils. Polychlorinated biphenyls, and Aldrin were detected in subsurface soils at concentrations that exceeded the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels. No constituents of concern were identified by the risk assessment for subsurface soils at Site 11.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 11, as documented in the September 2007 Record of Decision (Tetra Tech NUS, 2007). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 11 restrict land use to non-residential use. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 11 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 11. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 11, Site 12 – Tetraethyl Lead Disposal Area

Site 12, Tetraethyl Lead Disposal Area, is less than 0.1 acre in size and is located in the southeastern section of the Facility. Site 12 was used for the disposal of an undetermined amount of aviation gasoline tank bottom sludge waste. The disposal area consists of six earth-covered sludge mounds within a fenced area of approximately 100 feet by 25 feet. The mounds range from approximately 3 to 5 feet in height and 5 to 10 ft in diameter. Each sludge pile reportedly contained 200 to 400 gallons of sludge generated from cleaning fuel storage tanks and fuel filters. The sludge was stockpiled at its current location in May 1968.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 12 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 12 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 12 included four semi-volatile organic compounds, one pesticide, and 20 inorganic analytes. One constituent of potential concern, dieldrin, was identified; however, it was not retained as a constituent of concern following the human health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 12 included, one volatile organic compound, one semi-volatile organic compound, and 20 inorganic analytes. No constituents of potential concern were identified and no human health risks were identified for exposure to subsurface soils at Site 12.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no action remedy for Site 12. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 12 (TtNUS, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 12. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Base-wide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 12, Site 13 – Sanitary Landfill

Site 13, Sanitary Landfill, is a former landfill approximately four acres in size and is located along the eastern facility boundary near the South Air Field. Site 13 was first used as a landfill in 1979 and was the primary sanitary landfill for Naval Air Station Whiting Field until 1984 when disposal operation ceased. During 1979, waste solvents and residue from paint-stripping operations may have been disposed at the site. After 1979, the landfill reportedly received only general refuse and non-hazardous waste.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 13 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil sampling was conducted at Site 13 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 13 included one volatile organic compound, three semi-volatile organic compounds, and 20 inorganic analytes. No constituents of potential concern were identified and no human health risks were identified for exposure to surface soil at Site 13. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 13 included seven volatile organic compounds, five semi-volatile organic compounds, 20 inorganic analytes, and cyanide. One constituent of concern, mercury, was identified in the risk assessment for exposure to subsurface soils at Site 13.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 13, as documented in the September 2006 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2006). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 13 restrict land use to non-residential use. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 13 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 13. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 13, Site 14 – Short-Term Sanitary Landfill

Site 14, Short-Term Sanitary Landfill, was the primary sanitary landfill at Naval Air Station Whiting Field for six to nine months during the latter part of 1978 and the early part of 1979. Disposal operations ceased in this area because of the high clay content of the soil, which resulted in the ponding of rainwater throughout the site. The disposal area was covered with soil, and planted to pines after disposal operations ceased.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 14 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 14 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 14 included two volatile organic compounds, two semi-volatile organic compounds, 19 inorganic analytes, and cyanide. No constituents of potential concern were identified and no human health risks were identified for exposure to surface soil at Site 14. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 14 included four volatile organic compounds, three semi-volatile organic compounds, and 19 inorganic analytes. No constituents of potential concern were identified and no human health risks were identified for exposure to subsurface soils at Site 14.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no action remedy for Site 14. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 14 (TtNUS, 2006). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 14. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigate.

 

Operable Unit 14, Site 15 – Southwest Landfill

Site 15, Southwest Landfill, is approximately 21 acres in size and is located along the southwestern facility boundary near the South Air Field taxiway. The site topography slopes at about five percent to the southwest towards Clear Creek, located approximately 1200 feet southwest of the site. Site 15 was an operational landfill from 1965 to 1979 and consisted of approximately seven trenches oriented north-northeast. These trenches covered approximately 15 of the 21 acres of the site. The landfill reportedly received the majority of waste generated at Naval Air Station Whiting Field, potentially including general refuse, waste paints, oils, solvents, paint thinner, hydraulic fluid, bagged asbestos, and potentially PCB-contaminated transformer oil. Currently, Site 15 consists of vacant, unused land covered with sparse native grasses and scrub oak vegetative cover and planted pine trees approximately 20 to 30 feet in height.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 15 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 15 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 15 included three volatile organic compounds, three semi-volatile organic compounds, three pesticides, 20 inorganic analytes, and cyanide. No constituents of concern were identified following the revised risk assessment for surface soil at Site 15. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 15 included three volatile organic compounds, seven semi-volatile organic compounds, two pesticides/polychlorinated biphenyls, 20 inorganic analytes, and cyanide. One concern (Aroclor-1242) was identified as a constituent of concern following the revised risk assessment for surface soils at Site 15.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 15, as documented in the September 2006 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2006). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 15 restrict land use to recreational activities involving less than full-time human contact (such as parks and trails). Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 15 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 15. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 15, Site 16 – Open Disposal and Burning Area

Site 16, Open Disposal and Burning Area, is approximately 12 acres in size and is located along the southwestern facility boundary west of the South Air Field. From 1943 until 1965, the Site 16 area served as the primary waste disposal area for Naval Air Station Whiting Field. Two large pits were used for the disposal of general refuse. Other waste associated with aircraft maintenance and repair including paints, solvents, waste oil, hydraulic fluid, and waste water from paint stripping operations were reportedly disposed at the site. Dielectric fluids containing polychlorinated biphenyls may also have been disposed at the site. Annual disposal mass is estimated at between 3000 and 4000 tons. To help reduce waste volume, solid wastes were routinely burned using diesel fuel as an accelerant.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 16 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 16 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons( specifically benzo(a)pyrene), dieldrin, antimony, barium, chromium, copper and lead were detected at concentrations that exceeded Florida Department of Environment Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels, in surface soils. Carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons, barium, copper, and lead were identified as constituents of concern for surface soil at Site 16. Several carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, and lead were detected at concentrations that exceeded Florida Department of Environment Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels, in subsurface soil. Barium, copper, and lead were identified as constituents of concern for subsurface soil at Site 16.

In May 2002, an Interim Remedial Action, an excavation, was conducted at Site 16 to address surface soil with concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene greater than 62 micrograms per kilogram. The excavation area at Site 16 measured 45 feet by 20 feet and extended approximately 2 feet below the ground surface. Approximately 67 cubic yards (95.4 tons) of nonhazardous soil were removed, transported, and disposed of in an appropriately rated off-site landfill.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 16, as documented in the September 2008 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2008). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 16 restrict land use to recreational activities involving less than full-time human contact (such as parks and trails). Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 15 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 15. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 16, Site 17 – Crash Crew Training Area A

Site 17, Crash Crew Training Area A, is approximately four acres in size and is located along the northwest facility boundary near the North Air Field taxiway. Crash Crew training exercises and activities were conducted at Site 17 between 1951 and 1991. The exercises typically involved igniting approximately 100 gallons of aviation gasoline or jet fuel within a shallow depression containing a mock-up airframe, and extinguishing the fire with aqueous film-forming foam. In 1999, an Interim Remedial Action was undertaken where the contaminated areas of the site were covered with two feet of soil, and sod was placed over the soil cover.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 17 was completed in 2000. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 17 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Eight constituents of potential concern (xylene, naphthalene, antimony, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons) were identified for surface soil. Of these eight constituents, three (barium, copper, and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons) were identified as constituents of concern for surface soil exceeding criteria for a residential land use scenario at the site. Two constituents of potential concern (antimony and chromium) were identified for subsurface soils at Site 17. No constituents were identified as constituents of concern for subsurface soils.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 17, as documented in the September 2006 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2006). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 17 restrict land use to recreational activities involving less than full-time human contact (such as parks and trails). Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 17 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 17. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 17, Site 18 – Crash Crew Training Area B

Site 18, Crash Crew Training Area B, is approximately five acres in size and is located along the northwestern facility boundary near the North Air Field taxiway. Site 18 was used for the training of firefighting crews between 1951 and 1991. Site 18 consists of 11 burn pits (shallow depression approximately 1 to 2 feet deep) rimmed by mounded earth. Each of the burn pits contained decommissioned fuel tanks or aircraft fuselage to simulate aircraft crashes. Firefighting training activities consisted of pouring approximately 110 gallons of jet propellant (JP-5) fuel into the pits and igniting it. As part of the training exercises, the fires were then extinguished using aqueous film-forming foam. According to facility records, 6285 gallons of fuel and 3,148 gallons of aqueous film-forming foam were used during 1984 alone.

In 1999, an Interim Remedial Action was undertaken, where the contaminated areas of the site were covered with two feet of soil, and sod was placed over the soil cover.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 18 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 18 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Eight constituents of potential concern (2-methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons) were identified for surface soils at Site 18. Of these constituents, four (carcinogenic poly aromatic hydrocarbons, barium, copper and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons) were identified as constituents of concern, based upon a human health risk assessment. Three constituents of potential concern (2-methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons) were identified for subsurface soil at Site 18. Of these constituents, only total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons was identified as a constituent of concern, based upon a human health risk assessment.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 18, as documented in the September 2006 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2006). The Land Use Controls selected for Site 18 restrict land use to recreational activities involving less than full-time human contact. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 18 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 18. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 26, Site 29 – Auto Hobby Shop

Site 29, Auto Hobby Shop, is located in the area surrounding Buildings 1404 and 2975. Building 1404 has been used since the 1940’s for base personnel vehicle repairs, woodworking, and hobby activities. Building 2975 is used for vehicle and supply storage. One metal underground storage tank was installed in the 1940’s for storage of waste motor oil generated form vehicle maintenance operations conducted at the Auto Hobby Shop. The tank was abandoned in place in 1986 and was later removed from the Site in 1998. Another underground storage tank, which was used for storage of heating oil for Building 1404, was located in the parking area between Building 1404 and 2975. This tank was also removed in 1998.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 29 in 2005 (TtNUS, 2005). Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 29 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 29 included one volatile organic compound, three semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, and 16 inorganic analytes. No constituents of concern were identified in the Remedial Investigation. The subsurface soil borings were advanced at the former heating oil underground storage tank location. The soil was screened for organic vapors using a flame ionization detector and visual inspection for discoloration. No organic vapors were detected and no discoloration was observed indicating no contamination; therefore, no subsurface soil samples were collected for laboratory analysis. No human health risks were identified for exposure to surface and subsurface soils at Site 29.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no further action remedy for Site 29. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 29 (TtNUS, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 29. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 18, Site 30 - South Field Maintenance Hangar

Site 30, South Field Maintenance Hangar, is a parcel of land approximately 4.3 acres in size and is located at the South Field Industrial Area. The site includes Building 1406, the adjacent wash rack area, and the locations of four former waste oil/kerosene underground storage tanks, west of Building 1406. The South Field Maintenance Hangar was constructed in the mid-1940’s to support maintenance service for training aircraft. Activities at this site included engine maintenance, corrosion control, and aircraft cleaning. Maintenance activities generated waste engine oil, cleaning solvents, and paint stripping wastes. Other wastes generated by maintenance operations included mineral spirits, methyl ethyl ketone, hydraulic fluid, and all-purpose universal thinner. Waste oil from fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter maintenance was reportedly poured into the underground storage tanks located adjacent to the wash rack. The four steel waste oil/kerosene underground storage tanks, ranging in size from approximately 850 to 1,850 gallons, were located on the site until their removal in August 2000.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 30 in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 30 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 30 included volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, and inorganic analytes. Of these constituents only total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons was identified as a surface soil constituent of concern. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 30 included volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, and inorganic analytes. Of these constituents only total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons and benzo(a)pyrene were identified as subsurface soil constituents of concern.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Engineering controls and Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 30, as documented in the September 2004 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2004). The Engineering Controls require contaminated surface and subsurface soils to be covered with concrete or asphalt; thereby, preventing exposure to contaminated soil. The Land Use Controls selected for Site 30 restrict land use to nonresidential activities involving less than full-time human contact with surface and subsurface soils. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 30 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 30. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 19, Site 31 – Sludge Drying Beds and Disposal Areas A-F

Site 31, Sludge Beds and Disposal Areas, comprises six areas of land totaling approximately 13.4 acres, located on the southwest and the east sides of the facility. Area 31A is a sludge drying bed unit, 92 feet long by 80 feet wide. The unit consists of four sludge drying beds surrounded by containment walls extending to a depth of 2 to 3 feet below land surface (bls). The area is approximately 0.2 acre. The sludge drying beds were taken out of service in 1990. Sludge from the wastewater treatment plant may have contained hazardous substances such as methylene chloride and heavy metals from industrial effluent. Areas 31B, 31C, and 31D are mowed grassy areas, totaling 6.3 acres and located in an area of surface water control berms on the southwestern slopes of the South Air Field. A rubble pile containing concrete, asphalt, and metal rubble from former base operations is located at the southwest corner of Area 31C. Dried sludge was periodically removed from Area 31A, and disposed of at Areas 31B, 31C, and 31D. Spray applications of liquid sludge were also applied to the areas by tanker trucks. Areas 31E and 31F are locations where liquid sludge was formerly applied to the land surface northeast of Runway 5/23, east and west of the perimeter road. The extent of Areas 31E and 31F is approximately 6.9 acres.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 31 in 2001. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 30 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 31 included volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic analytes. Evaluation of the constituents present in the surface soil at Area 31C identified one polychlorinated Biphenyl (Arclor-1260), one pesticide (dieldrin), and several inorganic compounds (arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, barium, silver, and mercury) as exceeding Florida Department of Environmental Protection or United States Environmental Protection Agency risk-based human health screening values for residential land use, and lead exceeded levels for commercial/industrial land use. Areas 31A, 31B, 31D, 31E, and 31F had no surface soil constituents exceeding risk-based human health screening values for residential land-use. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 31 include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and inorganic analytes. Evaluation of the constituents present in the subsurface soil at Site 31 did not identify any constituents exceeding risk-based human health screening values for residential land-use.

An Interim Removal Action was performed at Site 31C. This action consisted of identifying all areas exceeding risk-based human health screening values for residential land-use, excavating and backfilling of 1,625 cubic yards of soil, and confirmation sampling. The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no further action remedy for Site 31. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision Amendment for Site 31 (TtNUS, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 31. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 20, Site 32 – North Field Maintenance Hangar

Site 32, North Field Maintenance Hangar, is a parcel of land approximately 3.5 acres in size located in the central portion of the facility. The site includes Building 1424, the adjacent wash rack area, and the former location of four waste oil/kerosene underground storage tanks, east of Building 1424. The North Field Maintenance Hangar was constructed in the mid 1940’s to support maintenance service for training aircraft. Activities at this site included engine maintenance, corrosion control, and aircraft cleaning. These activities generated waste stripping compounds, cleaning solvents, paint wastes, alkaline cleaners, detergents, oil, and hydraulic fluids. Before Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department activities began, aircraft maintenance wastes from hangar 1424 were reportedly sent to base landfills. Oil changes were routinely performed on the fixed-wing aircraft as part of the normal maintenance activities. The waste oil was reportedly poured into the four underground storage tanks located adjacent to the wash rack area. The four tanks ranged in size from 846 to 1,868 gallons. In 1986, the contents of the underground storage tanks were removed for off-base disposal in an appropriately rated landfill and the tanks were abandoned in place by filling the tanks with sand and the aperture with concrete. The tanks were removed in September 2000.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 32 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 32 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 32 included volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic analytes. Total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons was the only surface soil constituent of concern exceeding the Florida Department of Environment Protection soil cleanup target level. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 32 include volatile organic compound, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, and inorganic analytes. Trichloroethene; 1,2,4 trimethylbenzene; 1,3,5 trimethylbenzene; benzo(a)pyrene; and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons where determined to be constituents of concern for subsurface soils at Site 32.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Engineering controls and Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 32, as documented in the September 2004 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2004). The Engineering Controls require contaminated surface and subsurface soils to be covered with concrete or asphalt; thereby, preventing exposure to contaminated soil. The Land Use Controls selected for Site 32 restrict land use to nonresidential activities involving less than full-time human contact with surface and subsurface soils. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 32 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 32. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 21, Site 33 – Midfield Maintenance Hangar

Site 33, Midfield Maintenance Hangar, is a parcel of land approximately 2.5 acres in size located in the central portion of the facility. The site includes Building 1454 and the location of the former waste oil underground storage tank north of Building 1454. The Midfield Maintenance Hangar was constructed in the mid-1940s to support maintenance service of assigned aircraft and line maintenance on transient aircraft. Activities at this site included engine maintenance, corrosion control, and air craft cleaning. Maintenance activities typically generated less than 5 gallons per month of mixed waste paint and paint stripper, methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and naphtha.

In the early 1970s, the Ground Support Equipment shop moved from Building 2941 to the Midfield Maintenance Hangar. This shop is responsible for the maintenance on all ground support equipment (e.g., tow tractors, aircraft jacks, and maintenance stands). The shop routinely generated and estimated 30 gallons of waste PD-680 cleaning solvent per month and about 15 gallons of waste aircraft cleaning compound per month. Other wastes generated included lubrication oil, antifreeze, hydraulic fluid, and transmission fluid. All of these wastes were disposed of either in a mobile storage tank or in the former waste oil underground storage tanks. In 1986, the contents of the underground storage tank were removed for off-base disposal in an appropriately rated landfill and the underground storage tank was abandoned in place by filling the tank with sand and the apertures with concrete. The underground storage tank was removed in August 2000.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 33 was completed in 1999. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 33 to determine the nature and extent of contamination a the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 33 include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic analytes. No constituents in surface soil were identified as constituents of concern exceeding chemical-specific criteria for the current and anticipated future commercial/industrial use of the site. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 33 include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and inorganic analytes. Post-removal evaluation of the constituents present in subsurface soil at Site 33 identified TRPH as the only constituent exceeding FDEP or USEPA commercial/industrial land use criteria.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Engineering controls and Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 33, as documented in the September 2004 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2004). The Engineering Controls require contaminated surface and subsurface soils to be covered with concrete or asphalt; thereby, preventing exposure to contaminated soil. The Land Use Controls selected for Site 33 restrict land use to nonresidential activities involving less than full-time human contact with surface and subsurface soils. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 33 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 33. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 22, Site 35 – Public Works Maintenance Facility

Site 35, Public Works Maintenance Facility, is located in the central portion of the facility. Site 35 consists of Building 1429, the Public Works Maintenance Facility. Building 1429 was built in 1943 and used for the maintenance of vehicles and equipment, generation of power and heat, storage of firefighting equipment, wood working and metal repair, and offices. A gasoline service station with a pump island and underground fuel storage tanks was located at the northeast side of the building. The service station was equipped with three underground storage tanks (one diesel and two gasoline) located west of the pump island and under the vehicle shed. All three tanks were abandoned in place in 1984. The tanks were abandoned by pumping out the remaining fuel, filling the tanks with sand and capping the fill ports with concrete.

A Remedial Investigation was completed for Site 35 in 2005. Subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 35 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Surface soil samples were not collected at Site 35, because the site is completely covered by concrete and asphalt. Constituents detected in subsurface soil included five volatile organic compounds, one poly aromatic hydrocarbon, and 17 inorganics analytes. Two constituents, benzo(a)pyrene and chromium were identified as constituents of potential concern. Following the risk assessment, one constituent, benzo(a)pyrene was selected as a constituent of concern for subsurface soil.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected Engineering controls and Land Use Controls as the remedy for Site 35, as documented in the September 2006 Record of Decision (TtNUS, 2004). The Engineering Controls require contaminated subsurface soils to be covered with concrete or asphalt; thereby, preventing exposure to contaminated soil. The Land Use Controls selected for Site 35 restrict land use to nonresidential activities involving less than full-time human contact with surface and subsurface soils. Additionally, the Record of Decision requires an annual inspection to confirm conformance with this land use restriction. Every five years the effectiveness of the remedy at Site 35 is evaluated as part of a base-wide Five Year Review process. The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 35. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Basewide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Site 36 – Building 1440A, Auto Repair Booth

Site 36, Building 1440A, Auto Repair Booth, consists of a single service bay with a lubrication rack sump for working under vehicles. The drain for the lubrication rack was plugged prior to 1990. The drain originally emptied to a concrete sump which was connected to the storm sewer system. One aboveground waste oil tank is located on the east side of Building 1440A.

 

Site 37 – Building 1486, Paint Spray Booth

Site 37, Building 1486, Paint Spray Booth, Building 1486 was constructed in 1944 and includes the furniture shop and the paint spray booth. The paint spray reportedly contained a “waterfall recirculation system”. The system captured fumes from the painting operation and discharged to the sanitary sewer.

 

Operable Unit 23, Site 38 – Former Golf Course Maintenance Building 2877

Site 38, Former Golf Course Maintenance Building 2877, is located immediately west of the 7th hole fairway on the NAS Whiting Field Golf Course. Building 2877 was used as the golf course maintenance building. A review of historical aerial photographs indicates the building was present in June 1954 during the construction of the NAS Whiting Field Golf Course. Reportedly, golf cart battery reconditioning was conducted at the building. The battery acid was drained into a sink inside the building. The sink subsequently drained into a tank consisting of an underground concrete culvert open at one end. The tank retained approximately 50 gallons of liquid before draining to the subsurface soil. The tank was filled with rock sometime between 1974 and 1979, resulting in the discontinuance of battery acid draining at Site 38. Pesticides including organophosphates, herbicides, fungicides, chlordane, heptachlor epoxide, and some hydrocarbon pesticides were also stored and handled in Building 2877 during operations. Pesticide storage was discontinued in 1983 when a new pesticide facility was completed. A small parking area approximately 200-ft by 200-ft north of the building and across the access road was used to rinse trucks after they were used to spray pesticides. A 200-ft by 200-ft area located southwest of the building was used to fill pesticide containers. Building 2877 was demolished in 1993 as part of an upgrading and reconstruction project for the NAS Whiting Field Golf Course. Based on site investigations the concrete building foundation is believed to still be present; however, it is unknown if the former drainage tank is still present.

A Remedial Investigation for Site 38 was completed in 2005. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected at Site 38 to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site and to assess whether or not surface and subsurface soil could potentially serve as an exposure pathway to human or ecological receptors. Constituents detected in surface soil at Site 38 included one volatile organic compound, six pesticides, total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, and 17 inorganic analytes. Alpha-chlordane, gamma-chlordane, heptachlor epoxide and total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at concentrations greater than the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Soil Cleanup Target Levels. Constituents detected in subsurface soil at Site 38 included 18 inorganics.

In 2001, following additional soil sampling and Interim Removal Action to remove contaminated surface soil at Site 38, was conducted. The total volume of soil excavated from Site 38 was approximately 15 cubic yards. Following this Interim Removal Action no constituents of potential concern were identified; and as a result no human health risks were identified for exposure to surface or subsurface soil at Site 38.

The United States Navy and United States Environmental Protection Agency, with the concurrence of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, co-selected the no further action remedy for Site 38. This selection is documented in the Record of Decision for Site 38 (TtNUS, 2005). The Record of Decision only addresses surface and subsurface soil at Site 38. Consequently, the Record of Decision does not address actual or potential groundwater contamination at the site. Groundwater at Naval Air Station Whiting Field has been identified as a separate site (Site 40, Base-wide Groundwater), which is currently being investigated.

 

Operable Unit 24, Site 39 – Clear Creek Floodplain

Site 39, Clear Creek Floodplain, includes both Clear Creek and the Clear Creek floodplain. Site 39 is approximately 1,200 feet in length and 300 to 400 feet wide. The floodplain is an area of densely vegetated freshwater palustrine wetlands. The floodplain is narrow west of the creek due to a steep slope. The floodplain east of the creek is wider and consists of a hardwood swamp interspersed with marshy areas. Most of Clear Creek and its floodplain lie outside the property boundary of NAS Whiting Field. Swales and concrete-lined ditches drain storm water from the North and South Airfield on the west side of Naval Air Station Whiting Field. Additionally groundwater discharges into the east floodplain resulting in an increase of 16 cubic feet per second in stream flow (after no rainfall) between the SR87A Bridge and the southern boundary of Naval Air Station Whiting Field. Sediments of Clear Creek consist of shifting medium-grained sands where particle size ranges from coarse- to medium-grained sand with small amounts of gravel.

A Remedial Investigation is currently being conducted at Site 39 to determine the nature and extent of any contaminationa final version of the Remedial Investigation Report is scheduled to be completed during 2014.

 

Operable Unit 25, Site 40 – Basewide Groundwater

Site 40 was designated in 1999 and includes all groundwater underlying NAS Whiting Field. Site 40 was created for the ease of addressing the two large commingled groundwater plumes underlying several adjoining IR sites in the facility’s central area. This is a departure from the typical site where soils leach contaminants to groundwater and both soil and groundwater are addresses as one site.

A Remedial investigation is currently being conducted at Site 40 to determine the nature and extent of any contamination; a final version of the Remedial Investigation Report is scheduled to be completed during 2013.

 

 

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