Environmental

Site Descriptions

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Environmental History

NCBC Gulfport has been in operation since 1942. As a result of decades of industrial operations and material stockpile and storage, a total of ten sites have been identified at NCBC where historic releases of hazardous substances have occurred).

Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) and NCBC personnel have been actively working with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to identify, investigate and cleanup these sites since the early 1980’s. As a result, significant progress has been made in the environmental restoration program at NCBC over the past three decades. Remedial actions have been completed and long term monitoring is ongoing at 5 of the 10 sites. Studies are underway at the remaining 5 sites and NCBC/NAVFAC personnel are working to identify and implement appropriate remedial actions as quickly as possible. Note: A tenth site, Site 9, was removed from the IRP when further investigation determined that it was not contaminated.



Installation Restoration (IR) Sites

SITE 1 - Disaster Recovery Disposal Area

Site 1 is a closed 13.5-acre landfill used for waste disposal on base from 1942 to 1948. A variety of wastes, primarily from the public works and the supply department, were disposed of at the site. The landfill area was covered with soil when disposal activities ceased in 1948. Additional fill has been added over the years, and parking lots and roads have been constructed over the landfill. The site is relatively flat, with a slight slope to the north, and is maintained with a grass cover and has mature pine trees. The area was most recently used as a mock disaster recovery training and staging area

The remedial investigation completed in June 2013 identified tetrachloroethene (commonly called PCE), dieldrin, and metals in groundwater and dieldrin in soils as contaminants of concern.

The remedial action was completed in January 2015 to prevent direct exposure to the buried waste and associated contaminated soil and groundwater. The remedial action consisted of removing a small area of dieldrin contaminated soil and regrading ditches on site to promote surface water drainage. During investigation activities, a 2-foot minimum cover was verified to be present across the site.

Ongoing actions are monitoring groundwater to verify that the waste containment is effective and implementing land use controls (LUCs) so that the property is used in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover. LUC requirements include maintaining the 2-foot soil cover to prevent exposure and the vegetative cover to prevent erosion.

 

SITE 2 - World War II Landfill

Site 2 is a closed 8-acre landfill used for waste disposal on base from 1942 to 1948. An unknown quantity of solid wastes and refuse were burned and disposed of in trenches on the site. The area was used as part of the golf course from 1997 to 2010 and is currently for field training exercises. The site is mostly flat, with a slope to the north, and is maintained with a grass cover.

The remedial investigation, completed June 2013, identified contaminants of concern as carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAHs) in soil and cPAHs, arsenic, and iron in groundwater.

The remedial action, completed in June 2015, included covering the landfill with 2 feet of clean soil. Vegetation was then planted over the soil to prevent erosion. The cover was graded to prevent ponding of surface water to reduce infiltration of water and prevent erosion. The pond was filled with clean fill to contain the waste that was buried below and to allow for grading of the final cover. The purpose of the cover was to permanently and significantly reduce the possibility of exposure to any residual on-site hazardous substances and reduce the possibility of contaminants moving away from the site.

Long-term monitoring of groundwater was initiated to verify that the waste containment is effective, and land use controls were implemented so that the property is used in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover.

 

SITE 3 - Northwest Landfill

Site 3 is a closed 3.5-acre landfill used for waste disposal from 1948 to 1966. An unknown quantity of solid wastes and refuse were burned and disposed of in trenches on the site. Part of the site was used as a firefighter training area from the mid-1950s until 1966. From 1997 to 2010, Site 3 was part of the base golf course, and it is currently used as a recreational area. An open drainage ditch, Canal No. 1, is located along the eastern edge of the landfill with flow to the north-northeast.

The remedial investigation completed in 2011 identified carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in landfill soil/debris and volatile organic compounds and metals in groundwater as contaminants of concern.

The remedial action, completed in August 2014, included limited soil removal, grading the site to maintain a minimum cover of 2 feet of clean soil above the buried waste and/or contaminated soil, and improvement of surface water drainage to prevent ponding.

Ongoing actions include long-term monitoring (LTM) of groundwater verify that the waste containment is effective and land use controls (LUCs) to manage the property in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover. LUC inspections and LTM began in October 2014.

 

SITE 4 - Golf Course Landfill

Site 4 is a closed 4-acre landfill that operated from 1966 to 1972, receiving approximately 16,000 tons of solid and liquid waste. Waste was placed in trenches and burned then covered with soil. After completion of landfill operations, the site was covered with 10 feet of soil, and no visible signs of the landfill remained. Site 4 was later converted to a golf course that operated from 1977 to 2010 and is currently used as a recreational area. The site is relatively flat and is currently free of large vegetation. Canal No. 1, and open drainage ditch, is located along the northern edge of the landfill. Canal No. 1 collects storm water runoff from the western end of Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport.

The remedial investigation completed in 2009 identified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in landfill soil and debris; volatile organic compounds, metals, and dioxins in groundwater; dioxins and lead in surface water; and dioxins, PAHs, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides in sediment as contaminants of concern.

The remedial action, completed in 2011, included a low-permeability landfill cap, sediment removal, and erosion control in the adjacent Canal No. 1.

Ongoing actions include long-term monitoring (LTM) of groundwater verify that the waste containment is effective and land use controls (LUCs) to manage the property in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover. LUCs inspections and LTM began in in March 2012.

 

SITE 5 – Heavy Equipment Training Area

Site 5 is a closed 6-acre landfill. The site operated as a landfill from 1972 to 1976. An estimated 6000 cubic yards of solid waste and an unknown quantity of liquid wastes were disposed of in trenches and burned prior to backfilling. When landfill operations ceased, the site was covered with 4 to 6 feet of sand and was used as a heavy equipment training area until 2005. The site was most recently used as a golf course driving range (2010 to 2012) and is currently vacant. The site is flat with open drainage located along the southern and western edges. A family housing area is located approximately 50 feet south of the southern drainage ditch.

The remedial investigation completed in June 2008 identified dioxins and arsenic in landfill soil and debris and benzo(a)anthracene and dioxins in groundwater as contaminants of concerns.

The remedial action, completed in July 2009, included a geosynthetic liner, sediment removal, erosion control in adjacent ditches, and landfill gas management.

Ongoing actions include long-term monitoring (LTM) of groundwater verify that the waste containment is effective and land use controls (LUCs) to manage the property in a manner that will not damage the landfill cover. LUCs inspections and LTM began in in March 2012.

 

SITE 6 – Former Fire Fighting Training Area

Site 6 is a 2-acre site used for fire fighter training from 1966 to 1975. During this time, up to 500,000 gallons of various flammable liquids were used in two burn pits on site. When the fire fighting training area was closed, the burn pits were filled with sand and gravel. The site currently is currently an open, flat, grassy area. Ditches border the northern and western sides of the site

In 1991 a plume of petroleum hydrocarbons, estimated at 10 to 15,000 gallons, was found in the groundwater beneath the site. From 1995 to 1999, a trench interceptor recovery system was installed and operated. Approximately 5,000 gallons of product was removed in 4 years. By 1999, product removal had slowed significantly, and the system became impractical to continue using. From 2001 to 2004, a second technology, called a multi-phase extraction system, was installed and operated. This operation ceased when recovery of product declined to a couple of gallons per day.

In February and August 2005, post-removal action monitoring found that that petroleum hydrocarbon product was still present and identified contaminants of concern as naphthalene, vinyl chloride, and diesel range organics in groundwater. In January 2008, the multiphase extraction system was removed, and a groundwater monitoring program was initiated. In December 2008, surface soil was analyzed to screen for contamination that may have an impact on reuse of Site 6, and diesel range organics were found to be a contaminant of concern in soil.

In 2015, an active clean-up approach was initiated to speed up and optimize the rate of contamination removal at Site 6. An oxygen-based technology, called BIOX™, was injected into the soil and groundwater to help speed up the natural degradation of the contaminants present on site. The effectiveness of this technology is currently being monitored and evaluated.

 

SITE 7 – Rubble Disposal Area

Site 7 is a closed 7-acre landfill and surface disposal area. The landfill was used for construction and demolition waste disposal from 1978 to 1984. Unauthorized dumping may have occurred later than 1984. The area has most recently been used as a training area for Seabee field exercises following closure of the base golf course in 2010. Site 7 is relatively flat and is bordered by ditches along the northern, eastern, and western boundaries of the site.

The remedial investigation, completed in September 2017, identified carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAHs) and dioxins in soil and cPAHs, dioxins, and metals in groundwater as contaminants of concern. Stakeholders are reviewing the Feasibility Study to evaluate remedial alternatives to address any human health and ecological risk identified at the site.

 

SITE 8 – Former Herbicide Orange (HO) Storage Area

From 1968 to 1977, Site 8 was used by the United States Air Force to store 55-gallon drums containing 850,000 gallons of Herbicide Orange (HO). HO contains dioxin as an unwanted manufacturing byproduct. Spills and leaks from the drums resulted in release of dioxin to soil at the site. In 1977, the drums were removed from Site 8, and the area was fenced with access restricted. From 1985 to 1987, the Air Force conducted a cleanup that involved incineration of the dioxin-contaminated soil to reduce dioxins to the then current standard of 1 part per billion. At that time, two additional areas outside of the original Site 8 (designated as Sites 8B and 8C) were identified as HO drum storage locations. Ash from the incineration of dioxin-contaminated soil was stored on the original Site 8 (now designated as Site 8A).

In the mid-1990s, a series of groundwater sampling events showed that dioxins were present in the ditches leaving Site 8 and in the ditch on the northern side of the base along 28th Street. Sediment recovery traps were installed in 1995 as an interim measure to reduce the migration of dioxins in the on base ditches, and a removal action was completed to remove approximately 300 cubic yards of soil and sediment in the ditch immediately off-base. From 1995 to 1999, studies were performed to assess the extent of dioxin contamination from Site 8. From 2000 to -2004, a series of engineering studies, pilot scale tests, and removal actions were performed to preparation for full-scale remediation of Site 8A, which was completed in January 2007. This remedial action included excavating contaminated soil and sediment from off base and on base properties to Site 8 where it was consolidated and chemically stabilized, then covered with a concrete cap. In 2008, dioxin-contaminated sediments dredged from the canal located west of Canal Road were excavated, moved to Site 8B, and chemically stabilized.

Groundwater monitoring for Site 8 began in 2012. Sediment samples collected from ditches found with elevated dioxin concentrations. Further monitoring and evaluation showed that while the remedy at Site 8A continued to be protective, Sites 8B and 8C needed additional work to remain protective of human health and the environment. After additional studies and pilot-scale tests, a concrete cap was installed (beginning in 2018) to cover Sites 8B and 8C as a comprehensive measure to prevent movement of dioxins from the site. Long-term monitoring of groundwater, soil, and sediments will continue along with land use controls to restrict use of the site.

Currently, Site 8A is used as a solar panel farm. Sites 8B and 8C will be used for equipment storage upon completion of the concrete cap.

 

SITE 10 – Parade Field Ditch

Site 10 is in a ditch just north of the facility Parade Field. The ditch is approximately 10 feet wide and 4 feet deep. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments were found in the ditch during a basewide study of the ditch system that was completed in July 1997. In August 1999, a removal action was completed to excavate the PCB-contaminated sediments.

The remedial investigation, completed in 2007, again found PCBs in the ditch sediments, triggering further investigation.

The remedial action, completed in 2010, included lining the ditch with concrete to prevent exposure to PCBs.

Ongoing actions include long-term monitoring of sediments downstream of the cap and land use controls to manage use of the site.

 

SITE 11 – Navy Lumber Yard

Site 11 is a former Navy Lumber Yard that closed in 1948. In 2003, during construction of a new Army warehouse, 29 drums containing coal distillate and creosote were uncovered in the foundation area. Several of these drums were broken and had leaked. In 2004, the 29 drums and approximately 130 cubic yards of soil were excavated and disposed of as an emergency source removal action. Post excavation soil sampling indicated that contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater remained on site covered by concrete pavement.

The remedial action, initiated in 2014, included monitored natural attenuation (monitoring concentrations of naphthalene and carbazole in groundwater while allowing natural processes to reduce contamination over time) and land use controls to restrict use of the site.

In 2017, an active clean-up approach was initiated to speed up the rate of contamination removal at Site 11. An oxygen-releasing material called BIOX™ was injected into the soil and groundwater to help speed up the natural degradation of the contaminants. The effectiveness of this technology is currently being monitored and evaluated.

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